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Old 04-15-2017, 12:20 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,815 posts, read 12,319,426 times
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Washington DC
Pittsburgh
Charlotte
Columbus
Salt Lake City
Richmond, VA
Raleigh
Nashville
Las Vegas
Phoenix

Yes Las Vegas is not in earthquake country like California and is too dry for serious wildfires like they have in California.
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Old 04-15-2017, 07:47 AM
 
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Pittsburgh.
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Old 04-15-2017, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,657 posts, read 36,118,702 times
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Houston
Oklahoma City
New Orleans















Just kidding.

Hey, keeps things interesting. Weather is fascinating!
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Old 04-15-2017, 08:19 AM
 
21,185 posts, read 30,343,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
[b]Washington DC
Pittsburgh
Charlotte
Columbus
Salt Lake City
Richmond, VA
Raleigh
Nashville
Las Vegas
Phoenix
Actually recent seismic activity in the Mid-Atlantic states has changed that perception of "safety". The 5.8 quake in Northern Virginia in 2011 caused significant damage to the area and closed the Washington Monument for fear of collapse, and wasn't reopened until repairs ended three years later.
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Old 04-15-2017, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Capitol Hill - Seattle
420 posts, read 880,372 times
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Some of the mid-sized inland western cities like Spokane and Boise might work too - no huge temperature extremes, no tornados, low to no earthquake risk, low wildfire risk in the cities themselves....the worst they get is an occasional summer T-storm or winter blizzard but even those don't compare to what happens in the rest of the country. Not experiencing drought or flooding either.
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Old 04-16-2017, 07:22 PM
 
242 posts, read 162,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Houston
Oklahoma City
New Orleans















Just kidding.

Hey, keeps things interesting. Weather is fascinating!
Dallas
Miami
Tampa
Los Angles
San Francisco
Austin
San Antonio
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Old 04-20-2017, 03:13 PM
 
1,098 posts, read 398,901 times
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Boston Ma.
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Old 04-22-2017, 06:06 AM
sub
 
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Whether or not one considers blizzards a natural disaster, they're tame compared to tornados,floods, earthquakes,etc.
Cities that sit right along a Great Lake tend to fare better on average.
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Old 04-22-2017, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,509 posts, read 7,454,824 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sub View Post
Whether or not one considers blizzards a natural disaster, they're tame compared to tornados,floods, earthquakes,etc.
Cities that sit right along a Great Lake tend to fare better on average.
I have heard that upper Midwest places are among the safest in the nation from disasters. Think northern Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan here. The southern halves of those states still have significant tornado issues so they are out. If you don't mind 6 feet of snow and 40 below then the north woods of the Midwest may be the safest.
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Old 04-22-2017, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,532 posts, read 3,683,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I have heard that upper Midwest places are among the safest in the nation from disasters. Think northern Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan here. The southern halves of those states still have significant tornado issues so they are out. If you don't mind 6 feet of snow and 40 below then the north woods of the Midwest may be the safest.
I would agree that the upper midwest is not a high risk disaster area. However, tornadoes do occur in this region, and as you said, they tend to be in the southern portions of said States. However, weather can be extremely unpredictable, and just because certain areas escape severe tornadoes doesn't mean they can't happen. Just food for thought here. Conclusion: Be prepared.
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