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Old 04-22-2017, 10:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
I would agree that the upper midwest is not a high risk disaster area. However, tornadoes do occur in this region, and as you said, they tend to be in the southern portions of said States. However, weather can be extremely unpredictable, and just because certain areas escape severe tornadoes doesn't mean they can't happen. Just food for thought here. Conclusion: Be prepared.
There hasn't been a tornado in the city of Detroit since 1997. So it is pretty safe from natural disasters compared to the East Coast, the West Coast, and Oklahoma, the areas bordering the Mississippi River.



Hamtramck, MI July 2nd, 1997
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Old 04-22-2017, 11:43 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
Just taking a guess and saying Chattanooga TN. Was going to say Atlanta but then I remembered that tornado that occurred downtown. Your thoughts?
I would say Phoenix.

All they have to deal with is heat, which could be an issue for the elderly. However, in terms of natural disasters, Phoenix isn't under any risk at all.

I saw somebody mentioned Charlotte. They get tornadoes. I lived there for three years and there was at least one tornado warning per year and two tornadoes actually hit the city. It's nothing like tornado alley in terms of risk but there is a risk there.

Phoenix is the safest from natural disasters.

Oklahoma City is far and away the worst for natural disasters (possibly the most dangerous place on the planet by a longshot). Second is probably New Orleans and everything else is below that.

Last edited by bawac34618; 04-22-2017 at 11:53 PM..
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Old 04-23-2017, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
There hasn't been a tornado in the city of Detroit since 1997. So it is pretty safe from natural disasters compared to the East Coast, the West Coast, and Oklahoma, the areas bordering the Mississippi River.



Hamtramck, MI July 2nd, 1997
It's funny that people think large cities are somehow immune from tornado strikes. This one you cite is quite close to the heart of Detroit Michigan. People are surprised by events like these even though the southern portion of Michigan is tornado prone. One of the worst tornados in us history killed many people only 50 miles northwest of Detroit in 1953. Downtown Atlanta was struck just a few years ago, and it seems Nashville had a similar incident about 20 years ago. Tornados don't care if a big city is in thier way, it's only dumb luck that a big one has not run through the heart of a major Midwestern or Southern city yet. Imagine what a F5 would do to downtown Chicago, Atlanta or Dallas. We can only pray nothing like that happens but no one should think it won't. Those people in Detroit in that picture likely thought tornados don't hit big cities too.
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Old 04-24-2017, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
I would say Phoenix.

All they have to deal with is heat, which could be an issue for the elderly. However, in terms of natural disasters, Phoenix isn't under any risk at all.
Agreed. But we do get rather extensive flooding every summer and winter in areas it seems. And we are close enough to CA that if the big one hits, we will assuredly get damage, but nothing too extreme. Oh, and there have been tornadoes here in the AZ. They are few and far between, but have been recorded, as well as the obvious damaging wildfires.
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Old 04-24-2017, 10:44 AM
 
2,785 posts, read 1,628,289 times
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Actually recent seismic activity in the Mid-Atlantic states has changed that perception of "safety". The 5.8 quake in Northern Virginia in 2011 caused significant damage to the area and closed the Washington Monument for fear of collapse, and wasn't reopened until repairs ended three years later.
I doubt major earthquakes on the east coast will become the norm. I actually felt that earthquake in 2011. I was working outside when it happened.
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Old 04-24-2017, 05:45 PM
 
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lmfao, there's a big difference between a tornado that might take down a few poorly built homes and an earthquake that can literally do billions of dollars in damage and destroy an entire city, such as SF and Seattle.

If anything tornados discourage suburban sprawl, that's a good thing.

So we're basically down to Detroit, Pittsburgh, Chicago and Minneapolis being the safest geographic big cities in the country.
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Old 04-27-2017, 09:17 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,137,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
Washington DC
Pittsburgh
Charlotte
Columbus
Salt Lake City
Richmond, VA
Raleigh
Nashville
Las Vegas
Phoenix

Yes Las Vegas is not in earthquake country like California and is too dry for serious wildfires like they have in California.
And Salt Lake City is on the Wasatch Fault. They've been waiting for their own "big one" for years.
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Old 04-27-2017, 09:30 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMI View Post
Albuquerque


Agreed -- we get a few windy days but nothing very destructive. Snow is two inches for about six hours then gone. The local volcanoes are dead but the hot springs are nice. Might hit 100 degrees for a day in summer...might not. Bird poop on the windshield is about it and maybe a tumbleweed stampede.
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