U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:06 PM
 
2,790 posts, read 1,633,736 times
Reputation: 2030

Advertisements

Just taking a guess and saying Chattanooga TN. Was going to say Atlanta but then I remembered that tornado that occurred downtown. Your thoughts?
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:22 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
39,494 posts, read 2,978,735 times
Reputation: 12883
Somewhere in New Mexico.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:25 PM
AT9
 
Location: Midwest City, Oklahoma
691 posts, read 1,043,712 times
Reputation: 503
Interesting question. I'd nominate Winston-Salem.

It's too far inland to get severe hurricane damage; too far south to get severe blizzards/long-lasting severe cold streaks; it gets hot, but not extremely hot; low earthquake risk; and even the "severe" weather is rare and rather tame compared to severe thunderstorms further south (coastal/deep south) and west (Oklahoma/plains states) where tornadoes, flash flooding, and hail are a constant threat.

You can probably eliminate any coastal city due to hurricane and/or tsunami threats. The West coast is also earthquake prone. The mountain west has wildfires and, more long term, a lurking Yellowstone eruption.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:34 PM
 
2,790 posts, read 1,633,736 times
Reputation: 2030
Quote:
Originally Posted by evening sun View Post
Somewhere in New Mexico.
They are prone to droughts and wildfires aren't they?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:55 PM
 
Location: NYC/CLE
525 posts, read 447,961 times
Reputation: 341
Cleveland and Syracuse are often the top two. Others in the top 10 include Chicago, Detroit, Buffalo, Akron, Allentown, D. C and I think Denver.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:58 PM
 
Location: NYC/CLE
525 posts, read 447,961 times
Reputation: 341
Top 10 safest U.S. cities from natural disasters - CBS News
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
543 posts, read 313,121 times
Reputation: 828
Quote:
Originally Posted by usernameunavailable View Post
Cleveland and Syracuse are often the top two. Others in the top 10 include Chicago, Detroit, Buffalo, Akron, Allentown, D. C and I think Denver.
Lived in Cleveland for about 50 years. We've never had a tornado that did huge damage (mild damage only), no significant earth quakes, no major hurricane aftermath, no fires, no major droughts, no major floods. The only thing that comes to mind is the '78 blizzard.

Well, we had that economic collapse / rust belt thing but hey - no hurricanes!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 06:03 PM
 
2,790 posts, read 1,633,736 times
Reputation: 2030
Quote:
Originally Posted by usernameunavailable View Post
Cleveland and Syracuse are often the top two. Others in the top 10 include Chicago, Detroit, Buffalo, Akron, Allentown, D. C and I think Denver.
I guess they must not consider blizzards natural disasters......Seems silly to me to have Buffalo and Detroit on that list. D.C just had a tornado downtown yesterday, kinda close to the ocean to.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 07:58 PM
 
1,298 posts, read 1,200,807 times
Reputation: 3062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
I guess they must not consider blizzards natural disasters......Seems silly to me to have Buffalo and Detroit on that list. D.C just had a tornado downtown yesterday, kinda close to the ocean to.
I don't recall any homes being destroyed or swept away by falling snow. Snow is disruptive, not typically destructive (outside of an occasional big box store or stadium roof). Mortality tends to be by indirect means, by heart attacks or traffic accidents, and statistically there are really fewer accidents, deaths, and crimes during storms than on average days. "Cost" associated with snow is lost work-time, or additional road maintenance. Hardly equivalent to tornadoes, floods, landslides, or fires.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,537 posts, read 3,690,388 times
Reputation: 4124
San Diego, CA or Medford, OR. Both surprisingly are not big earthquake risks. And San Diego is somewhat sheltered due to geography from Pacific tsunami threats. Both rarely have tornadoes, typhoons/hurricanes are almost unheard of. Flooding is also unlikely. The biggest risk for both would be wildfires, but still low.

Last edited by pnwguy2; 04-07-2017 at 08:38 PM..
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top