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Old 04-09-2017, 07:34 PM
 
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I have been told over the years by many Texans that Houston is not the " real" Texas. I would say say that most bigger cities do not fit into their respective region (if you ask people who don't live in the cities).
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Old 04-09-2017, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Rutland VT never seemed to fit in with the rest of VT. Whenever I've been there, it seemed more sprawling and full of big box stores, compared to many of the other cities and villages in the state.
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Old 04-09-2017, 07:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Austin makes a lot of it's living claiming it is "different than the rest of Texas" though. But being the state capitol kind of makes it hard to run away.

It is obvious that Austin is less "Texan" than it used to be with all the move ins. But I suppose the same could be said for Dallas and Houston.

But back when the outlaw country thing was going. In the Armadillo World Headquarters days. It surely defined a good portion ofTexas culture. But they still have staples like Texas Mex and BBQ.
Very true. You really have to have experienced all of the cities in Texas to know that they're not all stereotypically Texan, especially Dallas. But repetitive marketing does impact people's perception though. Austin has been touted for more than a decade as the "end all, be all" in Texas and one that is uniquely different. There's a culture of smugness there that many believe they're the city in Texas that does everything right and has the best of everything. Of course not everyone acts that way and many long time natives are truly down to earth and genuine. But that air of superiority is definitely undeniable there if you mention you live in another TX city.

There's a bubble of delusion there that does make it very unique in Texas though. The sprawl is downplayed (but Dallas & Houston are beaten over the head for theirs), the liberalism is over-exaggerated (while D & H-town are politically mislabeled), and the city's pre-2000 culture is advertised as current (D & H are bashed for being generic, while ignoring all the new condos replacing beloved ATX institutions). Very special city indeed.
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Old 04-09-2017, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
I have been told over the years by many Texans that Houston is not the " real" Texas. I would say say that most bigger cities do not fit into their respective region (if you ask people who don't live in the cities).
It's a city built on oil, has a tall skyline. It is very Texan, it's the alpha city of Texas.
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Old 04-09-2017, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
Very true. You really have to have experienced all of the cities in Texas to know that they're not all stereotypically Texan, especially Dallas. But repetitive marketing does impact people's perception though. Austin has been touted for more than a decade as the "end all, be all" in Texas and one that is uniquely different. There's a culture of smugness there that many believe they're the city in Texas that does everything right and has the best of everything. Of course not everyone acts that way and many long time natives are truly down to earth and genuine. But that air of superiority is definitely undeniable there if you mention you live in another TX city.

There's a bubble of delusion there that does make it very unique in Texas though. The sprawl is downplayed (but Dallas & Houston are beaten over the head for theirs), the liberalism is over-exaggerated (while D & H-town are politically mislabeled), and the city's pre-2000 culture is advertised as current (D & H are bashed for being generic, while ignoring all the new condos replacing beloved ATX institutions). Very special city indeed.
Austin has a thin, educated populace. Its citizens are more like the west coast and bowash corridor. Rest of Texas, as far as body size and education, is more aligned with the deep south and midwest, sans Minneapolis and Chicago.
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Old 04-09-2017, 09:20 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Austin has a thin, educated populace. Its citizens are more like the west coast and bowash corridor. Rest of Texas, as far as body size and education, is more aligned with the deep south and midwest, sans Minneapolis and Chicago.
Austin is not like the boswash corridor. A tiny sliver around UT does not make you like DC or Boston. And Dallas lacks thin & educated people? The most pretentious, image conscious city in TX lacks thin people? The plastic surgery capital of Texas? You're right, all of Uptown/Central Dallas, Highland Park, and North Dallas is filled with fatties LMFAO. You're also right that all of the companies that have moved to DFW selected those without a college degree. Tell that to my NYC transplant friends. So clueless.
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Old 04-09-2017, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
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As others have said, Chicago is unlike the rest of Illinois.

And Pittsburgh and Philadelphia are unlike the rest of Pennsylvania.

Come to think of it, central PA and southern IL are somewhat similar though...
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Old 04-09-2017, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I agree. I think that New Orleans is deliciously southern to it's very core.

I visited West Virginia a couple of years ago and went to the Greenbrier Resort. Everywhere I looked, there was "southern paraphernalia" but I hate to break it to them - the Greenbrier is not a southern resort and it's not in a southern state. Wannabees! LOL

I think that Springfield, MO feels southern though it's technically not. Same with Oklahoma City.

I think that there's a distinctly southern vibe to some of the cities in Ohio, which definitely surprised me.
The Greenbrier and the springs of Virginia and West Virginia were responsible for the popularization of the mint julep, the earliest recorded serving of the drink is at the Greenbrier in 1816. The "Old White", now the Greenbrier was the most popular of the southern summer resorts. After the war Robert E. Lee and many of his generals vacationed there, which is where this picture was taken. (Publiic domain image)
Greenbrier county gave 2 regiments worth of men to the Confederacy, about 2,000.

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Old 04-10-2017, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Originally Posted by Bobilee View Post
The Greenbrier and the springs of Virginia and West Virginia were responsible for the popularization of the mint julep, the earliest recorded serving of the drink is at the Greenbrier in 1816. The "Old White", now the Greenbrier was the most popular of the southern summer resorts. After the war Robert E. Lee and many of his generals vacationed there, which is where this picture was taken. (Publiic domain image)
Greenbrier county gave 2 regiments worth of men to the Confederacy, about 2,000.
Well, that's all very interesting (I mean that seriously) but WV is not "the South" and I thought it was funny that there was so much "southern" paraphernalia in the gift shop at the Greenbrier. Kind of ironic considering why WV exists at all.

Quote:
With the outbreak of the Civil War, Virginia seceded from the Union in 1861. Very few of the residents of the western counties owned slaves, so they decided to stay with the Union. As a result, West Virginia, where "Mountaineers Are Always Free," was formed.
West Virginia Admitted as the 35th State in the Union

https://youtu.be/J581XFa9ec0
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Old 04-10-2017, 07:14 AM
 
Location: ATLANTA
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Miami, New Orleans and Louisville, KY doesn't belong in the south nor feels Southern to me... As far as Atlanta Metro, don't agree that it doesn't belong in the south like some other posters have stated. Even though it's big, still feels Southern to me, just has a lot of transplants. Still a lot of race issues in Georgia and Metro Atlanta. Surprisingly Nashville feels more open mined than Atlanta to me as far as races being together, mixing, etc. Atlanta just still feels closed mined to me. It still attracts a large number of blacks from other cities and most concentrates in the same areas. Also yes it has a number of different races here but most just stick to themselves for the most part or deal with each other on a work or school bases only. Just don't feel that unity of races here in Georgia like I feel in some other states I wouldn't even expect, still Georgia..

Last edited by oobanks; 04-10-2017 at 08:18 AM..
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