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Old 06-07-2017, 07:18 AM
 
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Richfield and Edina are virtually indistinguishable from the respective border neighborhoods in Minneapolis.

Evanston Illinois feels like an extension of the city of Chicago.
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Old 06-07-2017, 07:18 AM
 
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In St. Louis, Clayton, University City and Maplewood has the same density and identity of St Louis and should be part of the city. Clayton even competes with downtown St Louis for corporations.
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Old 06-07-2017, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
Richfield and Edina are virtually indistinguishable from the respective border neighborhoods in Minneapolis.

Evanston Illinois feels like an extension of the city of Chicago.
Agree with Richfield, to an extent, although the no sidewalks thing and the layout of the homes (sideways, vs. shotgun) makes it stand out to me. Edina, on the other hand, looks completely different than Minneapolis everywhere except the Country Club/Morningside neighborhoods, IMO. St. Louis Park, Hopkins, Robbinsdale, Columbia Heights, South St. Paul, etc. are examples where it's harder to see where the city ends and the suburbs start. St. Paul is the obvious answer, though it is considered a core city.

In Cleveland there were a lot of suburbs that I felt could have easily been mistaken for the central city, including Lakewood (most obvious), Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights, University Heights, East Cleveland, Warrensville Heights, Brooklyn, South Euclid, Lynhurst, Rocky River, and even Parma. I'm sure I'm missing several.

Chicago, also, has dozens and dozens of inner-ring suburbs that look and feel like the city of Chicago, let alone your typical American core city. Cicero and Evanston are the most extreme examples IMO, but there are so many others as well.
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Old 06-07-2017, 08:50 AM
 
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Alexandria, VA is pretty much just DC across the Potomac.

Decatur, GA, specifically downtown Decatur, is for all intents and purposes an intown Atlanta neighborhood.
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Old 06-07-2017, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Terramaria
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Alexandria, VA is pretty much just DC across the Potomac.
The same could be said for parts of Arlington, VA, notably the Potomac Yards area, Pentagon and Crystal City, and the corridor stretching from Rosslyn (opposite Georgetown) to Ballston. Arlington even has its own Columbia Heights neighborhood (sometimes known as Westmont), while not as dense as DC's, it still has lots of mult-family housing and a walkable section along Columbia Pike. Roughly the neighborhoods north/east of VA 120 still qualify as a "DC extension", with the exception of the single family neighborhoods north of US 29 along with the addition of the Potomac Yards area between Crystal City and Old Town Alexandria. Even downtown Silver Spring, MD also qualifies as you can travel down Georgia Avenue and not know you've entered DC, along with Friendship Village, MD opposite Friendship Heights. Parts of Captiol Heights, Chillum, Mt. Rainier, and Seat Pleasant also could qualify, strongly resembling the NE/SE neighborhoods towards the city line.

For Baltimore, Dundalk is the most prominent example, with many row house neighborhoods, along with parts of Essex and the area near the Eastpoint Mall, even though those aren't incorporated. Towson also in a similar matter to Silver Spring, with a walkable downtown area, and also the area between central Towson and the city line has a "semi-urban" feel with a mix of rowhouses, postage stamp-sized single family lots, and a commercial road with small parking lots and bus stops.
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Old 06-07-2017, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
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Philadelphia has Upper Darby, Norristown, and Conshohocken that are essentially extensions of the city proper. I'm sure I'm forgetting several others, while Camden, though across the Delaware river and quite impoverished isn't really a suburb.

Wilmington, DE has Elsmere and areas of North Wilmington (the Arden's, Bellefonte, Talleyville) that seamlessly blend in with adjacent areas of the city proper.
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Old 06-07-2017, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Alexandria, VA is pretty much just DC across the Potomac.

Decatur, GA, specifically downtown Decatur, is for all intents and purposes an intown Atlanta neighborhood.
Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't DC used to be part of Alexandria before DC even existed?
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Old 06-07-2017, 08:57 PM
 
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The interior areas of PG county aren't suburbs of D.C. Just a continuation of urban D.C
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Old 06-08-2017, 12:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't DC used to be part of Alexandria before DC even existed?
DC included Alexandria and Arlington County--everything in that missing southwest chunk that would make DC's shape a perfect diamond as it was when it was founded. The federal government retroceded VA's land contribution to the District (that southwest chunk) after a dispute involving slavery and Alexandria was once again its own city.
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