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View Poll Results: Most unoriginal City in America
ORLANDO 11 15.71%
AUSTIN 1 1.43%
CHARLOTTE 12 17.14%
MEMPHIS 0 0%
ATLANTA 7 10.00%
DALLAS 14 20.00%
NASHVILLE 1 1.43%
MIAMI 1 1.43%
LAS VAGAS 4 5.71%
NEW ORLEANS 0 0%
LOS ANGELES 1 1.43%
SAN ANTONIO 0 0%
PHOENIX 10 14.29%
HOUSTON 8 11.43%
Voters: 70. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-13-2017, 10:20 PM
 
1,827 posts, read 1,249,305 times
Reputation: 1822

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Do other regions steal ideas from Texas though?
Does the Texas Triangle even have any unique architecture to borrow to begin with? Everything I see looks like something I could find elsewhere, stylewise (though, this isn't unique either to the region).
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Old 04-13-2017, 10:31 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,235,162 times
Reputation: 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
Got any examples of similar architecture in PA? because they look like some regular houses to me.

A random street in Wilkes-Barre, PA. Obviously they're not going to be the same due to the the fact the front of the PA homes face the street and the Houston ones are all the exact same style. But the similarities are striking enough.

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.2445...8i6656!6m1!1e1
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Old 04-13-2017, 10:45 PM
 
1,185 posts, read 874,086 times
Reputation: 1847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Does the Texas Triangle even have any unique architecture to borrow to begin with? Everything I see looks like something I could find elsewhere, stylewise (though, this isn't unique either to the region).
Yes. In San Antonio and Austin, there has always been a lot of stone houses. Even a lot of newer houses have stone facades, which is something you don't really see in a lot of cities.

As for Houston/Galveston, shotgun housing similar to New Orleans was/is present in a lot of older blue collar areas. The upper class areas also resembled New Orleans, but most of the nice areas have been redeveloped in Houston with newer housing as the old homes started to need major repairs. Galveston didn't have as much demand for prime lots, so less of the houses were torn down and redeveloped. There is still a collection of nice old homes there.

And then there is Dallas. I'm not sure what Dallas' architectural style would be.
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Old 04-13-2017, 11:01 PM
 
Location: ATLANTA
2,129 posts, read 1,426,806 times
Reputation: 1609
I kinda think Atlanta all the way... I see Atlanta constantly building things really not needed, new stadiums, under used street cars etc., money that could be better used while infastructure lags way behind...
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Old 04-13-2017, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Does the Texas Triangle even have any unique architecture to borrow to begin with? Everything I see looks like something I could find elsewhere, stylewise (though, this isn't unique either to the region).

Prototypical Texas housing styles are one storey ranches, many which are brick or partly brick. Lots of pyramid style roofs. Homes like these are very typical in Texas http://theappraisaliq.com/wp-content...ustin-TX-9.jpg
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Old 04-14-2017, 02:22 AM
Status: "Get off my cloud !" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
5,095 posts, read 4,935,776 times
Reputation: 4176
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
I think some developers are trying to mimic cities in the East and Midwest to sell to new residents moving down from these regions and cities. Especially in Houston. You look at the older inner neighborhoods there, getting loads of infill and whole blocks with old ranches-homes being replaced by new close-knit singles to multi-residence Complexes and mini-gated developments.

Some you think they picked up a block from a city in the East or Midwest. So I'm not surprised they would try to imitate a Brownstone block. Lack of zoning tells developers they can build whatever they believe will sell.

They actually look like 100+ year old homes. But brand new.

Heck, this NEW development in Houston. Could pass for a old Coal mining village in PA. I'm serious too.

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7986...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7986...7i13312!8i6656

Where might this idea come from?

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7996...7i13312!8i6656

How about these?

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8081...7i13312!8i6656

Dave You must spend a lot of time searching Houston on Google Street view. I know you have posted pretty much every street view in the Heights. I makes me think you must really love it deep down inside.
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Old 04-14-2017, 02:24 AM
Status: "Get off my cloud !" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
5,095 posts, read 4,935,776 times
Reputation: 4176
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
I was thinking the exact same thing! Looks exactly like a town you'd find in the Appalachians throughout PA & WV.

Maybe it does look similar now , but it won't look similar for long...
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Old 04-14-2017, 02:40 AM
 
1,827 posts, read 1,249,305 times
Reputation: 1822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
Yes. In San Antonio and Austin, there has always been a lot of stone houses. Even a lot of newer houses have stone facades, which is something you don't really see in a lot of cities.

As for Houston/Galveston, shotgun housing similar to New Orleans was/is present in a lot of older blue collar areas. The upper class areas also resembled New Orleans, but most of the nice areas have been redeveloped in Houston with newer housing as the old homes started to need major repairs. Galveston didn't have as much demand for prime lots, so less of the houses were torn down and redeveloped. There is still a collection of nice old homes there.

And then there is Dallas. I'm not sure what Dallas' architectural style would be.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Prototypical Texas housing styles are one storey ranches, many which are brick or partly brick. Lots of pyramid style roofs. Homes like these are very typical in Texas http://theappraisaliq.com/wp-content...ustin-TX-9.jpg
Thanks, both of y'all. Texamichiforniasota, do you mind posting pictures of the stone houses you mention? A bit interested from their description.

As for the ranch houses, I suppose I never though of it. Thinking about it now, I have seen plenty of older homes matching that style around DFW but not as much elsewhere I have traveled. Not that I particularly like said homes, but I can understand that others would for their own reasons.
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Old 04-14-2017, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,849 posts, read 2,975,563 times
Reputation: 3394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Does the Texas Triangle even have any unique architecture to borrow to begin with? Everything I see looks like something I could find elsewhere, stylewise (though, this isn't unique either to the region).
Yep. Texas cities are pretty unoriginal.
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Old 04-14-2017, 08:31 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,155,936 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
I think some developers are trying to mimic cities in the East and Midwest to sell to new residents moving down from these regions and cities. Especially in Houston. You look at the older inner neighborhoods there, getting loads of infill and whole blocks with old ranches-homes being replaced by new close-knit singles to multi-residence Complexes and mini-gated developments.

Some you think they picked up a block from a city in the East or Midwest. So I'm not surprised they would try to imitate a Brownstone block. Lack of zoning tells developers they can build whatever they believe will sell.

They actually look like 100+ year old homes. But brand new.

Heck, this NEW development in Houston. Could pass for a old Coal mining village in PA. I'm serious too.

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7986...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7986...7i13312!8i6656

Where might this idea come from?

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7996...7i13312!8i6656

How about these?

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8081...7i13312!8i6656
Some of those housing styles are not foreign to Houston at all. Early 20th century craftsman homes exist in Texas just like they do further east. If anything, developers are making them more urbane by building them closer together and giving them an artsy finish.
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