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View Poll Results: Most unoriginal City in America
ORLANDO 11 15.71%
AUSTIN 1 1.43%
CHARLOTTE 12 17.14%
MEMPHIS 0 0%
ATLANTA 7 10.00%
DALLAS 14 20.00%
NASHVILLE 1 1.43%
MIAMI 1 1.43%
LAS VAGAS 4 5.71%
NEW ORLEANS 0 0%
LOS ANGELES 1 1.43%
SAN ANTONIO 0 0%
PHOENIX 10 14.29%
HOUSTON 8 11.43%
Voters: 70. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-14-2017, 08:37 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,154,807 times
Reputation: 4349

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
. Yes especially the junk around the commercial building. If it didn't say it was in Houston, I would've guessed Altoona or Wilkes-Barre. Pretty much any town or small city there. I know southwestern PA receives a lot of transplants from Texas for fracking. Maybe they brought PA back to Texas with them.
Doubt it
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Old 04-14-2017, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,311,571 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
I think some developers are trying to mimic cities in the East and Midwest to sell to new residents moving down from these regions and cities. Especially in Houston. You look at the older inner neighborhoods there, getting loads of infill and whole blocks with old ranches-homes being replaced by new close-knit singles to multi-residence Complexes and mini-gated developments.

Some you think they picked up a block from a city in the East or Midwest. So I'm not surprised they would try to imitate a Brownstone block. Lack of zoning tells developers they can build whatever they believe will sell.

They actually look like 100+ year old homes. But brand new.

Heck, this NEW development in Houston. Could pass for a old Coal mining village in PA. I'm serious too.

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7986...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7986...7i13312!8i6656

Where might this idea come from?

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7996...7i13312!8i6656

How about these?

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8081...7i13312!8i6656
That's actually really impressive how they're infilling like this all across this area! I've never seen such a thing from a BUILT-OUT city before! It's amazing that there is a.) that much developable space to build, and b.) enough demand to satiate that style of housing in a city/area that is known for its space/sprawl. The clash of zoning and architecture is hard on the eyes, but I like the effort and infill!
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Old 04-14-2017, 11:13 AM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
Reputation: 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Yep. Texas cities are pretty unoriginal.
You do realize there's a ton of similar architecture in every single Northeastern city? There's housing in DC that can be found in Alexandria, Baltimore, Philly, etc. The coal mining towns of PA & WV look practically identical to one another. The architecture in Cleveland can be found in Rochester, Syracuse, Buffalo, etc. They have a lot more character now due to age but they were the cookie cutter housing back in their day.

And DC is the epitome of a planned city.
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Old 04-14-2017, 11:24 AM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
Reputation: 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by oobanks View Post
We have all seen them, those Mayors that run off to other Cities to see what other Cities are doing and the next thing you know they are back home trying to get it built in their City to compete. I can't say its a bad or good thing, all a matter of Opinion but its definitely Unoriginal and can sometimes make Cities look way over done. Next thing you know you have a City that looks like every other Major City in America, all thrown together in one big Mixing bowl.. I think my main problem with this is when we see our basic infrastructure not up to par or basic amenities not getting taken care of, Citizens suffering but something New and Shinny pops up in the house. It's almost like keeping up with the Jones's with something we really don't need or is a waste of Money when we can't even get our regular bills paid at home. Which Major American Cities do you see falling into this Category the Most??
You can build something original, while neglecting your basic amenities. Likewise, you can build something unoriginal but also take care of the basics. Some of the unoriginal developments, especially high density/mixed use ones, have generated a ton of revenue for cities so that they can pay for the basics.
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Old 04-14-2017, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,627 posts, read 27,042,193 times
Reputation: 9576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
That's actually really impressive how they're infilling like this all across this area! I've never seen such a thing from a BUILT-OUT city before! It's amazing that there is a.) that much developable space to build, and b.) enough demand to satiate that style of housing in a city/area that is known for its space/sprawl. The clash of zoning and architecture is hard on the eyes, but I like the effort and infill!
I posted in the urban planning thread that this block reminded me of Chicago very much.
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8003...7i13312!8i6656

But those same houses in the front now that I think about it, looks like something in New Orleans, no?

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8008...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 04-14-2017, 01:46 PM
 
1,185 posts, read 874,086 times
Reputation: 1847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Thanks, both of y'all. Texamichiforniasota, do you mind posting pictures of the stone houses you mention? A bit interested from their description.
Stone Houses with metal roofs in the Texas Hill Country:

https://www.google.com/maps/@30.2756...7i13312!8i6656

King William neighborhood, San Antonio:

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.4149...7i13312!8i6656

Austin:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Au...430608!6m1!1e1

Modern Day Suburban Version with metal roof Outside San Antonio:

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.5965...8i6656!6m1!1e1

As for Shotgun houses in Galveston:

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.3086...8i6656!6m1!1e1

Traditional Upscale Housing in Houston/Galveston (Most in Houston has been torn down a replaced with newer structures):

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.3023...8i6656!6m1!1e1
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Old 04-14-2017, 01:54 PM
AT9
 
Location: Midwest City, Oklahoma
691 posts, read 1,043,303 times
Reputation: 503
Charlotte. It's nice and I'd rather live there than several of these cities, it's just sort of generic and lacking in original character. Orlando and Vegas are cheesy, suburban tourist traps, but they're too unique to garner my vote.

NOLA, Memphis, Miami, San Antonio, and LA shouldnt even be in the poll.
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Old 04-14-2017, 03:08 PM
 
182 posts, read 143,274 times
Reputation: 179
Charlotte and Dallas are very 2 generic unoriginal major cities.
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Old 04-14-2017, 03:08 PM
 
3,215 posts, read 1,541,554 times
Reputation: 2332
I think LA and Chicago as the most PUT TOGETHER Big cities. LA defined the Ranch and California Craftsmen Bungalows other cities copied. Chicago defined its Chicago Craftsmen Bungalows Frank Lloyd Wright inspired features and defied a more Attached notion of urban housing chose NOT to copy NYCs tenement-style.

Most Chicago style homes are unique to it or was adopted in other cities. Same with LA's. One can say LA's sprawling concept hurt cities that copied it? But I do believe those that copied Chicago's street-grid of standard set-backs of housing for green-frontage? But kept it close-knit narowish lots with alleys in back. Could have did much worse and ALLOWED much more sprawl allowed to evolve? As like LA., had plenty of flat land to sprawl or allow it to come in.

Alley's housing garages and a place to put the power-lines and poles. I don't see as a outdated concept? Giving how some cities build whole new neighborhoods today - and keep big ugly poles in front of a beautiful new home or development.

The worst are those cities that really did not define a housing variety it's known for and did not plan at all---> the kind of city they wanted to become. Those that didn't even build a complete street-system of curbing and drains also.
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Old 04-14-2017, 03:43 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,673,134 times
Reputation: 1838
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
I think some developers are trying to mimic cities in the East and Midwest to sell to new residents moving down from these regions and cities. Especially in Houston. You look at the older inner neighborhoods there, getting loads of infill and whole blocks with old ranches-homes being replaced by new close-knit singles to multi-residence Complexes and mini-gated developments.

Some you think they picked up a block from a city in the East or Midwest. So I'm not surprised they would try to imitate a Brownstone block. Lack of zoning tells developers they can build whatever they believe will sell.

They actually look like 100+ year old homes. But brand new.

Heck, this NEW development in Houston. Could pass for a old Coal mining village in PA. I'm serious too.

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7986...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7986...7i13312!8i6656

Where might this idea come from?

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7996...7i13312!8i6656

How about these?

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.8081...7i13312!8i6656
I wouldn't say these new constructions in Houston are a bad thing. In fact, they're great. I love them. They're a natural way of densification. Houston is growing and new construction like this is how cities were originally built, grown and densified. The hodgepodge of various little townhomes here and there give Houston the feel of a real, organic city.

Dallas' construction, on the other hand, is in the hands of a smaller number of much larger developers, building a bunch of monolithic apartment complexes that take up whole blocks. And those are popping up in a lot of cities. I am not a fan of those, at all.
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