U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-17-2017, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Sacramento CA
295 posts, read 159,487 times
Reputation: 216

Advertisements

Cimarron NM
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-17-2017, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,640,935 times
Reputation: 3625
Colorado and Wyoming have steppe climates. I'm talking about places that actually lack grass due to little precipitation but are still colder than our hot desert cities.

To be classified as a desert you must get less than 10" of annual precipitation. Albuquerque gets 8 or 9 inches I believe.. Phoenix and Tucson get 8". Las Vegas gets 4".

Albuquerque actually does grow grass, as I saw on its west side, but gets a pass because it's patchy and still has brown tones. Santa Fe was similar. Lack of precipitation is why. There are no native grasses in Phoenix and Tucson by comparison.

Idaho and Wyoming, in their flat parts, still have a Plains looking appearance. Dead grass is still grass, which is why no one considers coastal Southern California a desert either. That and annual rainfall.

North Nevada and Utah were great additions to the list. What about summer highs?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2017, 05:29 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,015 posts, read 6,367,272 times
Reputation: 8281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Colorado and Wyoming have steppe climates. I'm talking about places that actually lack grass due to little precipitation but are still colder than our hot desert cities.

To be classified as a desert you must get less than 10" of annual precipitation. Albuquerque gets 8 or 9 inches I believe.. Phoenix and Tucson get 8". Las Vegas gets 4".

Albuquerque actually does grow grass, as I saw on its west side, but gets a pass because it's patchy and still has brown tones. Santa Fe was similar. Lack of precipitation is why. There are no native grasses in Phoenix and Tucson by comparison.

Idaho and Wyoming, in their flat parts, still have a Plains looking appearance. Dead grass is still grass, which is why no one considers coastal Southern California a desert either. That and annual rainfall.

North Nevada and Utah were great additions to the list. What about summer highs?
Not all of Colorado is steppe. Like I said, south central/southwest Colorado has cold desert climates. Alamosa only receives 7.25 inches of rain a year and is officially designated a cold desert climate (not semi-arid). I've been through that area. It's definitely a desert.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2017, 05:40 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,015 posts, read 6,367,272 times
Reputation: 8281
^Sorry, meant to say south EAST CO. At any rate, I'm not sure there is a true desert in the US that gets as cold as parts of the San Luis Valley.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2017, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,930 posts, read 2,215,703 times
Reputation: 2610
Using Koppens definition of a desert, these are the desert climates in WA.

Richland
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.3382...7i13312!8i6656

Pasco
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.2599...7i13312!8i6656

Desert Aire
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.6629...7i13312!8i6656

Sunnyside
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.4063...7i13312!8i6656

Hanford Site
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.5466...7i13312!8i6656
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2017, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,930 posts, read 2,215,703 times
Reputation: 2610
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
We are all well aware of hot deserts. Phoenix, El Paso, Palm Springs, Las Vegas, Tucson, they all sit in them. The US' desert region is rather filled with hot desert climates, which take up most of Nevada, all of Arizona except the "Green Belt" (look on Google Maps you'll know what I mean), most of New Mexico, most of Utah. What about cold deserts?

Cold deserts are incredibly rare climates as a whole when looking globally. Cold deserts, in its biggest concentration, are far west China and Mongolia, in the Gobi desert and in Tibet. They extend far north in Asia up into Kazakhstan and into China's Northeast region. The Gobi desert is THE cold desert worldwide.

What about areas with cold desert climates? What are the coldest our American deserts can see in the summer highs?

Albuquerque is considered a cold desert climate. Are there other places in the US?
You do realize that "cold deserts" have hot summers right? They just happen to have cold winters.

Aral, Kazakhstan

Turpan, China

If you want cool summers, than you are looking for a mild desert, not a "cold" one, such as on the chilean coast.

Antofagasta, Chile
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2017, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
992 posts, read 577,974 times
Reputation: 601
Most of eastern Oregon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2017, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,640,935 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
You do realize that "cold deserts" have hot summers right? They just happen to have cold winters.

Aral, Kazakhstan

Turpan, China

If you want cool summers, than you are looking for a mild desert, not a "cold" one, such as on the chilean coast.

Antofagasta, Chile
I am doing a comparison on summer highs for a reason. The difference has always been in the winter, always. This is actually a benefit for the hot deserts rather than the other way around. It's key to note that people who have no desert experience seem to not recognize how important that is.

Albuquerque for an example reaches roughly mid-90s in the summer, yes? 90s at least... Phoenix can get in the 110s. So twenty degree difference. But in the winter, Phoenix highs are about the 70s or 60s. Albuquerque can get winter highs to the point that snow can be expected. This means at least 30 degrees. So a forty degree difference. (I realize that Albuquerque has large variations in elevation, but even at the bottom in downtown this happens often enough). This is an even more stark comparison in SLC which is not a desert city, but is regularly considered one.

Barrow is technically considered a desert because it falls under 10" of annual precipitation. Barrow's highs are only in the 40s, which is winter lows in Phoenix. All polar climates practically fit the definition of a desert, which is why Antarctica is considered the biggest desert on Earth. Because they snow instead of rain.

The point is that hot summers are non-escapable in less humid climates. It's only with humidity--coastlines and such--can that be possible. It's why it gets so hot in LA inland so quickly. Your link of the Chilean city is proof of that.

Also the link you have for Chile still sees 80% humidity levels with little rain, which is baffling. Reminds me of Dubai and Kuwait which is just like that. Though for me it would have less humidity, and colder winters (Jun-Aug). Which would mean more inland. But, its a double-edge sword, because that means higher summer temps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2017, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,930 posts, read 2,215,703 times
Reputation: 2610
Well there are some desserts that have cool summers in Mongolia, but they tend to have high elevations.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%96lgii_(city)#Climate

Also if you go inland in Chile, the summers are still pretty mild, and the humidity does go down a bit.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copiap%C3%B3#Climate

And if you go really high up in Bolivia, the summers can be a bit on the chilly side.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uyuni#Climate
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2017, 05:40 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,015 posts, read 6,367,272 times
Reputation: 8281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post

The point is that hot summers are non-escapable in less humid climates. It's only with humidity--coastlines and such--can that be possible. It's why it gets so hot in LA inland so quickly. Your link of the Chilean city is proof of that.
Again, the counter-example to that would be the San Luis Valley. It has BOTH a high elevation AND an arid desert climate which is rather unique in the Western Hemisphere.

Average summer highs/lows:

May: 68.3/32.4
June: 78.4/40.4
July: 81.7/46.4
August: 78.9/45.2

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alamos...lorado#Climate

To me that's a pretty cool summer considering it has such a dry climate. That's cooler than Minneapolis in the summer and on par with Seattle summer highs, with the exception of August where it's about 4 degrees warmer. Plus you are seeing day/night differentials approaching 40 degrees throughout the summer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top