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Old 04-23-2017, 12:44 PM
 
1,577 posts, read 981,531 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
How does the southern part of Delaware compare to the adjacent eastern shore of Maryland?
For a state that is as small as it is I would think that Delaware is pretty different south to north but I'm speculating.
Eddie, good call. My opinion, Northern DE is different than Southern DE. Delaware is like a Border State within a Border State, changing from North to South.
Southern DE, Sussex County, is similar to Eastern Shore of Maryland & VA. Lots of agriculture.. Sussex County DE is also politically Conservative.. which obviously the South doesn't have a monopoly on, but I consider a more Southern trait.

In 1861, Lincoln submitted the idea of compensated emancipation for Delaware's slaves.. but Sussex county rejected that offer, viewing it as Federal overreach. A position that was consistent w/Southern antebellum ideology. Southern DE also sent troops to the Confederacy.

I used to live in Maryland, & when driving from MD's Eastern Shore, up thru Southern Delaware, the areas felt identical,.. minus Delaware's speed traps.
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Old 04-23-2017, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,839 posts, read 6,181,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Babe_Ruth View Post
Eddie, good call. My opinion, Northern DE is different than Southern DE. Delaware is like a Border State within a Border State, changing from North to South.
Southern DE, Sussex County, is similar to Eastern Shore of Maryland & VA. Lots of agriculture.. Sussex County DE is also politically Conservative.. which obviously the South doesn't have a monopoly on, but I consider a more Southern trait.

In 1861, Lincoln submitted the idea of compensated emancipation for Delaware's slaves.. but Sussex county rejected that offer, viewing it as Federal overreach. A position that was consistent w/Southern antebellum ideology. Southern DE also sent troops to the Confederacy.

I used to live in Maryland, & when driving from MD's Eastern Shore, up thru Southern Delaware, the areas felt identical,.. minus Delaware's speed traps.

Thanks for info. Have always been fascinated by the NOVA/Maryland/Delaware/Philly/Southern NJ dynamic as it relates to cultural things. Probably nowhere in the country is there such change culturally in such a small area. I bet it was really fascinating decades ago.
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Old 04-23-2017, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
How does the southern part of Delaware compare to the adjacent eastern shore of Maryland?

For a state that is as small as it is I would think that Delaware is pretty different south to north but I'm speculating.
Delaware is a transitional state from north to south. New Castle County is part of Greater Philadelphia and mirrors its northern neighbor demographically, infrastructurally, historically and politically, with very small differences. Wilmington is essentially Philadelphia junior, while the rest of suburban New Castle County resembles suburban SE Pennsylvania.

Once you cross the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal into lower New Castle County and Kent County, Delaware becomes like the rest of Sunbelt America, though I wouldn't call it Southern. It's a mix of traits, as Kent County is still part of the Philadelphia CSA and media market. Put it this way, you can get cheesesteaks while you watch NASCAR. Kent County voted for Trump with 49.5% of the vote, but Hillary and Gary Johnson got 44.6% and 3.8% of the vote.

The Southern portion of Delaware begins once you pass Harrington into Sussex County. This is Delaware's most conservative area (60% for Trump) and most Sunbelt like in development. It's also debatedly "Southern" in culture and the county that is booming the most. The interior is incredibly rural and conservative, while the beach towns are wealthy, liberal enclaves. All of Sussex is part of the Salisbury metropolitan area and has essentially the same culture as the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Whether you consider that Southern is up to you, though it's definitely not Georgia Southern. When people in Delaware say "Slower Lower", Sussex County is what is meant, though everything south of the C and D Canal is technically Slower Lower (or Lower Slower for the "LSD" bumper stickers).
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Old 04-23-2017, 03:08 PM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,532,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Babe_Ruth View Post
Btown, The Mason-Dixon isn't random. It profoundly separated the degrees of slavery. North of Mason-Dixon had already emancipated their slaves.. or slavery was in severe decline (like Delaware).
South of Mason-Dixon, slavery was more necessary & integral to their economy.

Obviously circumstances are different 150 years later. But I believe the Mason-Dixon's still a political and demographic fault line (to some extent).
It's not irrelevant but it's arbitrary. Communities are much more intergrated along the Mason Dixon line than across the Ohio.
An example is all of Kentucky has 11 roads across the Ohio River, between the DE border and the Sesquahana there are 27 border crossings.
There is simply a lot more cultural connection between MD and PA than KY and the states on the other side of the Ohio.
This is not to say the Mason Dixon line has no effect on culture or demographics because MD and DE are debatably Southern but it's Arbitrary nature has allowed it to break down as a hard line over the years, while the Ohio will always be a physical boundary (1-2 miles wide) between the North and South.
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Old 04-23-2017, 07:43 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,739 posts, read 6,134,571 times
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Baltimore seems more southern now than back in the day. Urban renewal and suburbs destroyed Baltimore. Luckily it's bouncing back nicely.


Baltimore when everyone considered it southern
https://youtu.be/EEJLhcfaT4A

https://youtu.be/7Sz3zfOl2s4

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Old 04-24-2017, 11:25 AM
 
Location: ATLANTA
2,128 posts, read 1,426,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Delaware is a transitional state from north to south. New Castle County is part of Greater Philadelphia and mirrors its northern neighbor demographically, infrastructurally, historically and politically, with very small differences. Wilmington is essentially Philadelphia junior, while the rest of suburban New Castle County resembles suburban SE Pennsylvania.

Once you cross the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal into lower New Castle County and Kent County, Delaware becomes like the rest of Sunbelt America, though I wouldn't call it Southern. It's a mix of traits, as Kent County is still part of the Philadelphia CSA and media market. Put it this way, you can get cheesesteaks while you watch NASCAR. Kent County voted for Trump with 49.5% of the vote, but Hillary and Gary Johnson got 44.6% and 3.8% of the vote.

The Southern portion of Delaware begins once you pass Harrington into Sussex County. This is Delaware's most conservative area (60% for Trump) and most Sunbelt like in development. It's also debatedly "Southern" in culture and the county that is booming the most. The interior is incredibly rural and conservative, while the beach towns are wealthy, liberal enclaves. All of Sussex is part of the Salisbury metropolitan area and has essentially the same culture as the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Whether you consider that Southern is up to you, though it's definitely not Georgia Southern. When people in Delaware say "Slower Lower", Sussex County is what is meant, though everything south of the C and D Canal is technically Slower Lower (or Lower Slower for the "LSD" bumper stickers).
Having lived in Delaware,, have to Agree with this 100%!!!
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Old 04-24-2017, 07:09 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Default Maryland and Delaware

Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
How odd.

Delaware and Maryland aren't entirely north or south of one another, I really don't know how it ever made sense to call one southern and one not.

Maybe people have been kinda ditzy about geography for a long time.
Cookster, the reason that Maryland was Southern and Delaware was considered Northern (Middle Colony) is more political then geographic.

Maryland was founded by settlers sailing up the Chesapeake Bay past Virginia and developed similarly to Virginia with tobacco plantations along the rivers. Remember Virginia was THE Southern Colony in the early 1600s and Maryland became associated with Virginia.

Delaware in contrast, once New Netherland was conquered, became part of New York from 1664 to 1682, part of Pennsylvania from 1682-1701 and then became only quasi-independent of Pennsylvania until 1776. So unlike Maryland, Delaware was associated with the Northern states for many years.
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Old 04-25-2017, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,730,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Cookster, the reason that Maryland was Southern and Delaware was considered Northern (Middle Colony) is more political then geographic.

Maryland was founded by settlers sailing up the Chesapeake Bay past Virginia and developed similarly to Virginia with tobacco plantations along the rivers. Remember Virginia was THE Southern Colony in the early 1600s and Maryland became associated with Virginia.

Delaware in contrast, once New Netherland was conquered, became part of New York from 1664 to 1682, part of Pennsylvania from 1682-1701 and then became only quasi-independent of Pennsylvania until 1776. So unlike Maryland, Delaware was associated with the Northern states for many years.
Makes sense.

My bigger question is what does that have to do with modern times, you know? The world and how humans interact is %100 different now than it was then. Radio, Television, methods of travel, north/south transplanting, business, internet... lines have blurred immensely.

I won't dispute Maryland's original connection to the south but I still argue its modern one. Any similarities are more a relic of history than something indicative of the here and now.

I think that our overall ideas of what the south and the north are have changed as well. Dramatically. Back in 1750 you probably were not likely to hear a southerner describe the north the same way they would today, and vice-versa. Even shortly after the civil war I'm sure perceptions were very different than they are now.

I believe that at one point Kentucky was respected as a state with high education.
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Old 04-25-2017, 12:42 AM
 
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Arlington, VA doesn't feel Southern to me, so I doubt Maryland would
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Old 04-25-2017, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Baltimore - Richmond
500 posts, read 329,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Arlington, VA doesn't feel Southern to me, so I doubt Maryland would
Arlington was apart of Washington DC until Virginia wanted the land back. The only cities on the Maryland side that feel similar to Arlington are Bethesda and Silver Spring. Maryland is a small state but it has a wide range of lifestyles and cities representing different regions. It has Appalachian- Frederick, Northern, Southern, Mid Atlantic- Annapolis and Tidewater/Chesapeake Bay- Eastern Shore area. Maryland, like Virginia, is much more of a mixed bag than a lot of people realize. It's impossible to really nail it down as entirely Northern or Southern.

I purposely didn't mention cities for Northern or Southern because I didn't want this to turn into a "Baltimore is..." debate.

Last edited by mpier015; 04-25-2017 at 06:44 AM..
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