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Old 04-25-2017, 09:31 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Arlington, VA doesn't feel Southern to me, so I doubt Maryland would
I rode home from Arlington, through DC, to MD yesterday. All I saw were license tags from DC, MD, VA, PA, DE, NY, and NJ. I counted one stretch of more PA tags than I saw VA or DC, and this was in the city of Washington DC. The connections to Maryland/DC area to points northward are beyond glaring and obvious.
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Old 04-25-2017, 10:03 AM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 601,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
I rode home from Arlington, through DC, to MD yesterday. All I saw were license tags from DC, MD, VA, PA, DE, NY, and NJ. I counted one stretch of more PA tags than I saw VA or DC, and this was in the city of Washington DC. The connections to Maryland/DC area to points northward are beyond glaring and obvious.
I work in Arlington, and those are most of the license plates that I see. There are some rare NC plates too, but for the most part, it's obvious how connected NOVA is to the Mid-Atlantic and the NE US. When my relatives and friends from Mississippi and Georgia come here to visit, Arlington is not a southern city to them, and Maryland (where me and my relatives live) might as well be New Jersey to them.
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Old 04-25-2017, 10:13 AM
 
29,917 posts, read 27,355,630 times
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Originally Posted by biscuit_head View Post
I work in Arlington, and those are most of the license plates that I see. There are some rare NC plates too, but for the most part, it's obvious how connected NOVA is to the Mid-Atlantic and the NE US. When my relatives and friends from Mississippi and Georgia come here to visit, Arlington is not a southern city to them, and Maryland (where me and my relatives live) might as well be New Jersey to them.
To me, Arlington is just New Urbanism on steroids and more Americana than Northern or Southern. It feels something like a cross between Perimeter/Sandy Springs and Cherry Hill.
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Old 04-25-2017, 10:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
To me, Arlington is just New Urbanism on steroids and more Americana than Northern or Southern. It feels something like a cross between Perimeter/Sandy Springs and Cherry Hill.
I disagree.... below are just some aerials. Arlington also houses the Pentagon and the Arlington Cemetery and is surrounded by a river. They look even more different at street level considering people walk in Arlington (8814/sqmi) and people drive in Sandy Spring (2707/sqmi) and Perimeter which results in more mixed use (Arlington) vs. strip malls (Sandy Springs). If anything they are more like Reston. To me Arlington is a bit more like Jersey City - density, skyline against water, right across the river from DC/NYC, serviced by multiple modes of public transit.

Perimeter/Sandy Spring
https://www.flickr.com/photos/skylinescenes/6790472494




Arlington

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Old 04-25-2017, 11:02 AM
 
29,917 posts, read 27,355,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
I disagree.... below are just some aerials. Arlington also houses the Pentagon and the Arlington Cemetery and is surrounded by a river. They look even more different at street level considering people walk in Arlington (8814/sqmi) and people drive in Sandy Spring (2707/sqmi) and Perimeter which results in more mixed use (Arlington) vs. strip malls (Sandy Springs). If anything they are more like Reston. To me Arlington is a bit more like Jersey City - density, skyline against water, right across the river from DC/NYC, serviced by multiple modes of public transit.

Perimeter/Sandy Spring
https://www.flickr.com/photos/skylinescenes/6790472494




Arlington
This is why I said it's a cross between Perimeter and Cherry Hill, although Cherry Hill may not be the most appropriate example as a Northern suburban area. Arlington is basically a denser version of a Sunbelt edge city; it's not a historic urban center. That's the point.

Actually, one of the western Sunbelt edge cities would probably be a better example since they tend to be a bit denser on average than Southeastern edge cities.
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Old 04-25-2017, 11:12 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
This is why I said it's a cross between Perimeter and Cherry Hill, although Cherry Hill may not be the most appropriate example as a Northern suburban area. Arlington is basically a denser version of a Sunbelt edge city; it's not a historic urban center. That's the point.

Actually, one of the western Sunbelt edge cities would probably be a better example since they tend to be a bit denser on average than Southeastern edge cities.
Even Cherry Hill is only 2,948.3/sq mi which makes sense for it to be more similar to Sandy Spring/Perimeter. Arlington is not "a denser version of a sunbelt edge city", it is X2.5 more dense. This creates an area that functions very differently as an area/city. I just don't think there is a peer for Arlington (8814/sqmi) in Atlanta. I could see resemblances for Bethesda/Buckhead and Reston/Sandy Springs but that's about it. I would even say Midtown Atlanta is more like Arlington then anything else.

Last edited by Ebck120; 04-25-2017 at 11:58 AM..
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Old 04-25-2017, 11:19 AM
 
29,917 posts, read 27,355,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Even Cherry Hill is only 2,948.3/sq mi which makes sense for it to be more similar to Sandy Spring/Perimeter. Arlington is not "a denser version" of a sunbelt edge city", it is X2.5 more dense. This creates an area that functions very differently as an area/city. I just don't think there is a peer for Arlington (8814/sqmi) in Atlanta. I could see resemblances for Bethesda/Buckhead and Reston/Sandy Springs but that's about it. I would even say Midtown Atlanta is more like Arlington then anything else.
There are denser Sunbelt edge cities out there; I just mentioned Perimeter because that's the one I'm most familiar with. Western Sunbelt cities have higher average densities and are typically built on a grid system. One of the edge cities there would be a better point of comparison than one in the Piedmont; perhaps Uptown Houston?
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Old 04-25-2017, 11:31 AM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 601,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
There are denser Sunbelt edge cities out there; I just mentioned Perimeter because that's the one I'm most familiar with. Western Sunbelt cities have higher average densities and are typically built on a grid system. One of the edge cities there would be a better point of comparison than one in the Piedmont; perhaps Uptown Houston?
Either Uptown Houston, Uptown Dallas, or Kendall/Dadeland area near Miami. The only Piedmont equivalent I can think of is Buckhead in Atlanta, but Arlington is denser in its commercial and residential districts.
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Old 04-25-2017, 11:34 AM
 
2,507 posts, read 2,269,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
There are denser Sunbelt edge cities out there; I just mentioned Perimeter because that's the one I'm most familiar with. Western Sunbelt cities have higher average densities and are typically built on a grid system. One of the edge cities there would be a better point of comparison than one in the Piedmont; perhaps Uptown Houston?
I would say Uptown is more comparable to Tysons Corner. I've only been to Uptown twice but it felt more like Tysons especially with the newness, minimal pedestrians walking around and Galleria being such a central focus.
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Old 04-25-2017, 12:40 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,735 posts, read 6,139,094 times
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Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
I would say Uptown is more comparable to Tysons Corner. I've only been to Uptown twice but it felt more like Tysons especially with the newness, minimal pedestrians walking around and Galleria being such a central focus.
They both have the Mall, with a smaller high-end galleria across the street.
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