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Old 04-26-2017, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and wherever planes fly
1,558 posts, read 2,391,619 times
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The following suburbs around major cities might strike your fancy.

Plano, Frisco, Allen,North Fort Worth, Keller >> Dallas/Ft. Worth Metro
Cary, Morrisville, Holly Springs >> Raleigh, NC
Huntersville, Concord, Matthews, Pineville>> Charlotte, NC
The Woodlands >> Houston, TX
Round Rock, Georgetown>> Austin, TX
Overland Park >> Kansas City, MO
Golden, Aurora, Thornton>> Denver, CO
Vinings, Decatur, Sandy Springs, Johns Creek>> Atlanta, GA
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Old 04-26-2017, 11:38 AM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,522,521 times
Reputation: 2305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taynxtlvl View Post
The following suburbs around major cities might strike your fancy.

Plano, Frisco, Allen,North Fort Worth, Keller >> Dallas/Ft. Worth Metro
Cary, Morrisville, Holly Springs >> Raleigh, NC
Huntersville, Concord, Matthews, Pineville>> Charlotte, NC
The Woodlands >> Houston, TX
Round Rock, Georgetown>> Austin, TX
Overland Park >> Kansas City, MO
Golden, Aurora, Thornton>> Denver, CO
Vinings, Decatur, Sandy Springs, Johns Creek>> Atlanta, GA
The couple times I've been to the Dallas area, I was in Forth Worth a decent amount. I didn't do a lot of "exploring" but it seemed decent and housing prices seem reasonable as well
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Old 04-26-2017, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,554 posts, read 10,261,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg10556 View Post
The couple times I've been to the Dallas area, I was in Forth Worth a decent amount. I didn't do a lot of "exploring" but it seemed decent and housing prices seem reasonable as well
It's definitely easy to establish a comfortable life in DFW. It has plenty of jobs, cheap-ish houses, and all the garden-variety amenities you could ever need. That being said, you've admitted you have an outdoor inclination, and when it comes to that DFW pretty much falls flat on its face.

On a scale from 1-10:
Camping - 4
Biking - 4
Hiking - 2 (and that's being very generous)
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Old 04-26-2017, 02:36 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,522,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
It's definitely easy to establish a comfortable life in DFW. It has plenty of jobs, cheap-ish houses, and all the garden-variety amenities you could ever need. That being said, you've admitted you have an outdoor inclination, and when it comes to that DFW pretty much falls flat on its face.

On a scale from 1-10:
Camping - 4
Biking - 4
Hiking - 2 (and that's being very generous)
Camping wouldn't be a concern, and the biking I do, is pretty much on the road/paved trails. Are there bike lanes in Fort Worth for the most part?

Hiking is definitely preferred, but I can make due if there are substitutes, like a lake or something to swim/paddle board in?
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Old 04-26-2017, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,554 posts, read 10,261,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg10556 View Post
Camping wouldn't be a concern, and the biking I do, is pretty much on the road/paved trails. Are there bike lanes in Fort Worth for the most part?

Hiking is definitely preferred, but I can make due if there are substitutes, like a lake or something to swim/paddle board in?
I'll let others address how the biking infrastructure is nowadays. When we left in 2011 it was pretty weak. The suburb we lived in had zero dedicated bike lanes. Off-road biking is likely still better than on-street.

Dallas made a huge to-do about hiring a "bike czar" to improve on-street cycling. She lasted about 18 months and ended up moving here (Denver).

DFW has a handful of large reservoirs, but they weren't my cup of tea. They're really crowded, and the water is super murky and full of algae slime.
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Old 04-26-2017, 03:30 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,522,521 times
Reputation: 2305
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
I'll let others address how the biking infrastructure is nowadays. When we left in 2011 it was pretty weak. The suburb we lived in had zero dedicated bike lanes. Off-road biking is likely still better than on-street.

Dallas made a huge to-do about hiring a "bike czar" to improve on-street cycling. She lasted about 18 months and ended up moving here (Denver).

DFW has a handful of large reservoirs, but they weren't my cup of tea. They're really crowded, and the water is super murky and full of algae slime.
That's a bummer. I've always wanted to get into more of mountain biking, so off road biking could be fun. But the water/lake situation is a bummer
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Old 04-26-2017, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Texas
57 posts, read 57,557 times
Reputation: 101
Since you're fairly open ended, I'll just start naming cities that I think are/would be cool to live in.

1. Oklahoma City

This is where I live right now. Honestly, if you aren't the picky type then OKC would be just fine for you. The entire city feels more like one big suburb and the cost of living is amazing. I live in a 2000 sqft home, 3 bedroom+office, 3 car garage, fenced in back yard, nice neighborhood for 220k . Nature here is underrated. We've got multiple mountain ranges, grassy plains, rolling hills, huge reservoir lakes, waterfalls, natural swimming areas like slow moving creeks, apparently a salt flat that I've never been to, and some sand dunes called the little Sahara. OK is where the east turns into the west, so while traveling around the state the landscape can vary by a lot. I've seen plenty of people biking on the street but IMO its dangerous because the car culture here really doesn't support it much. I go mountain biking on trails around the lakes sometimes instead. Plus I'm going to take up sailing soon since the lakes are big enough to support it. OKC has just about everything someone could need shopping-wise, and it's full of food choices. A few big things that are missing: that "spark" that makes other cities feel alive. Coming from the northeast, when people from around here call OKC the big city, I secretly laugh to myself. It just doesn't feel that way. There also isn't a well established young adult culture like other cities. It's not non-existent, but its not in your face either. Also, you have to do really good research into the schools. A lot of them are terrible. I think the best schools in the state should be fine, but a lot of them I would stay away from. Also, the weather. I think thunderstorms are fun, but some people panic at the thought of a tornado, so depending on how you feel I would stay away if you think it would be a constant source of anxiety.

2. Dallas/Fort Worth

I like the DFW, but if I had to pick, I'd probably choose Fort Worth over Dallas. Just because getting on the highways around Dallas feels like a life or death situation just about every time. Fort Worth doesn't feel as crazy in my opinion. Nature would be lacking compared to OKC, but you'll get more out of the city in my opinion. I've only ever visited the area, so I can't speak about it as much as OKC. Although I do know that if you move there, look for older housing! About a month ago some storms went through that almost knocked entire houses over. The weather service estimated winds to be something like 80-90mph, which is high, but that sort of wind should do little to NO damage to a well built home. I'm talking like, the walls were blown out of these houses like they were made of cardboard. The construction on some of the homes in the area is fast and cheap, so they are only barely meeting code. Find a home at least 10+ years old, I'd say.

3. Pittsburgh

I grew up outside of Pittsburgh and it's a nice little city. It has a Midwest feel mixed with Appalachian charm. I believe it has one of the greenest downtown areas in the country. You'll have no problem finding nature, even in the city. One of my favorite things to do is kayak the rivers downtown. Good skiing is less than 2 hours away too. Last I saw, Pittsburgh sort of stalled when it came to it's revitalization. It's the type of place that isn't struggling but doesn't offer much in the way of growth. Of course, this isn't an issue if your company can relocate you and you're not applying for random jobs. It's also good for housing prices because they stopped increasing. The one big downside for me, and one of the reasons I'll probably never go back, is the weather. Summer is amazing but it's almost as dreary as the pacific northwest (as is much of the great lakes region). I personally struggle with lack of sunlight, so if that' something you're wanting to stay away from, beware. Otherwise, it's a very nice place. Beware of where you buy a home. Traffic can be terrible coming in/out of the tunnels on the south and east side of the city. There are mostly 2-lane highways because of outdated infrastructure and difficult topography (Pittsburgh is built on hills surrounded by 3 rivers.)

4. From Tampa to Ft Meyers Florida

I'm listing this one because housing isn't too expensive, the weather is awesome, and you have direct access to the best beaches in Florida. If your company is setting you up with a job then you've got the hardest part taken care of. My only concern is the infamous Florida Man. People tend to get a little wild in Florida. Maybe the hot weather makes people feel a little crazy? The hurricanes wouldn't scare me away personally.

5. Rapid City South Dakota

This one might break your 'not too cold' rule, but for some reason I feel like these small plains cities can be charming. I liked this area specifically because it's so different from what I'm used to, and it's close to the black hills, which I love. Having said that, I don't know if it would be a good place to settle down for the next 10 years. I personally think I'd like being there for a year or 2 before wanting to leave because I get bored easily. I also don't know much about the area otherwise, but I'm listing it anyway because it's different. (Add Casper and Cheyenne WY to this list for similar reasons)

6. Colorado Springs

I love Colorado but hate the idea of living in Denver. It expanded too fast for it's own good, and Boulder is too expensive for it's own good. I've never been to Colorado Springs, but that's where I would look next. I hear you're actually closer to the mountains in CS than Denver anyway, and it comes without the crowds. Having said that, you'll be surrounded by californians as they take over the state, so keep that in mind!
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Old 04-26-2017, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Delaware
14 posts, read 7,928 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by cirrusly View Post
Since you're fairly open ended, I'll just start naming cities that I think are/would be cool to live in.

1. Oklahoma City

This is where I live right now. Honestly, if you aren't the picky type then OKC would be just fine for you. The entire city feels more like one big suburb and the cost of living is amazing. I live in a 2000 sqft home, 3 bedroom+office, 3 car garage, fenced in back yard, nice neighborhood for 220k . Nature here is underrated. We've got multiple mountain ranges, grassy plains, rolling hills, huge reservoir lakes, waterfalls, natural swimming areas like slow moving creeks, apparently a salt flat that I've never been to, and some sand dunes called the little Sahara. OK is where the east turns into the west, so while traveling around the state the landscape can vary by a lot. I've seen plenty of people biking on the street but IMO its dangerous because the car culture here really doesn't support it much. I go mountain biking on trails around the lakes sometimes instead. Plus I'm going to take up sailing soon since the lakes are big enough to support it. OKC has just about everything someone could need shopping-wise, and it's full of food choices. A few big things that are missing: that "spark" that makes other cities feel alive. Coming from the northeast, when people from around here call OKC the big city, I secretly laugh to myself. It just doesn't feel that way. There also isn't a well established young adult culture like other cities. It's not non-existent, but its not in your face either. Also, you have to do really good research into the schools. A lot of them are terrible. I think the best schools in the state should be fine, but a lot of them I would stay away from. Also, the weather. I think thunderstorms are fun, but some people panic at the thought of a tornado, so depending on how you feel I would stay away if you think it would be a constant source of anxiety.

2. Dallas/Fort Worth

I like the DFW, but if I had to pick, I'd probably choose Fort Worth over Dallas. Just because getting on the highways around Dallas feels like a life or death situation just about every time. Fort Worth doesn't feel as crazy in my opinion. Nature would be lacking compared to OKC, but you'll get more out of the city in my opinion. I've only ever visited the area, so I can't speak about it as much as OKC. Although I do know that if you move there, look for older housing! About a month ago some storms went through that almost knocked entire houses over. The weather service estimated winds to be something like 80-90mph, which is high, but that sort of wind should do little to NO damage to a well built home. I'm talking like, the walls were blown out of these houses like they were made of cardboard. The construction on some of the homes in the area is fast and cheap, so they are only barely meeting code. Find a home at least 10+ years old, I'd say.

3. Pittsburgh

I grew up outside of Pittsburgh and it's a nice little city. It has a Midwest feel mixed with Appalachian charm. I believe it has one of the greenest downtown areas in the country. You'll have no problem finding nature, even in the city. One of my favorite things to do is kayak the rivers downtown. Good skiing is less than 2 hours away too. Last I saw, Pittsburgh sort of stalled when it came to it's revitalization. It's the type of place that isn't struggling but doesn't offer much in the way of growth. Of course, this isn't an issue if your company can relocate you and you're not applying for random jobs. It's also good for housing prices because they stopped increasing. The one big downside for me, and one of the reasons I'll probably never go back, is the weather. Summer is amazing but it's almost as dreary as the pacific northwest (as is much of the great lakes region). I personally struggle with lack of sunlight, so if that' something you're wanting to stay away from, beware. Otherwise, it's a very nice place. Beware of where you buy a home. Traffic can be terrible coming in/out of the tunnels on the south and east side of the city. There are mostly 2-lane highways because of outdated infrastructure and difficult topography (Pittsburgh is built on hills surrounded by 3 rivers.)

4. From Tampa to Ft Meyers Florida

I'm listing this one because housing isn't too expensive, the weather is awesome, and you have direct access to the best beaches in Florida. If your company is setting you up with a job then you've got the hardest part taken care of. My only concern is the infamous Florida Man. People tend to get a little wild in Florida. Maybe the hot weather makes people feel a little crazy? The hurricanes wouldn't scare me away personally.

5. Rapid City South Dakota

This one might break your 'not too cold' rule, but for some reason I feel like these small plains cities can be charming. I liked this area specifically because it's so different from what I'm used to, and it's close to the black hills, which I love. Having said that, I don't know if it would be a good place to settle down for the next 10 years. I personally think I'd like being there for a year or 2 before wanting to leave because I get bored easily. I also don't know much about the area otherwise, but I'm listing it anyway because it's different. (Add Casper and Cheyenne WY to this list for similar reasons)

6. Colorado Springs

I love Colorado but hate the idea of living in Denver. It expanded too fast for it's own good, and Boulder is too expensive for it's own good. I've never been to Colorado Springs, but that's where I would look next. I hear you're actually closer to the mountains in CS than Denver anyway, and it comes without the crowds. Having said that, you'll be surrounded by californians as they take over the state, so keep that in mind!
You have a very good description of Pittsburgh and summarized my feelings about it exactly. I lived there for 3.5 years. I agree with the weather - my first summer out there didn't even feel like summer because it was overcast almost every day. Agree with the traffic and terrain too - downtown was kind of a pain to get to.
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Old 04-26-2017, 08:11 PM
 
Location: New York Metropolitan Area
406 posts, read 287,937 times
Reputation: 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg10556 View Post
My wife and I are from the Indiana/Kentucky area (Louisville, So.Indiana) We lived there until about a year and a half ago. I then received and amazing opportunity with my company and we moved to San Francisco. We have been a little over a year and have about a year left until I can transfer again, however we are about to begin the "planning" phase of things. We definitely want OUT of this area and out of California in general. I am luckily able to transfer about anywhere in the US so any suggestions welcome.

A little background for us. We are in our mid-20's, no kids(but plan to have some in the next 2-3 years), have great jobs/careers, and enjoy the outdoors. Political stance isn't a huge issue, however we cannot live in another "California", as elite liberalism is just too much to deal with. We like suburbs compared to actually living in a major city. We have only lived in a couple places so far, Louisville, KY...Nashville, TN...and currently San Francisco. We did not like Nashville, and do not like San Francisco/California.

Out next move, we want to make somewhat permanent. As in buy a house and stay at least 5-10 years. Each State/city obviously has a different cost of living , but we manage to pay outrageous rent & still do all we live in the San Francisco area, so that's that, but we would like somewhere more affordable to actually be able to own & pay off a house.

So, all being said, just looking for possible suggestions on where we might be a "fit".

Thanks in advance
I'd honestly recommend some NYC suburbs. Long Island for the most part is pretty moderate politically (Nassau leaned Democrat and Suffolk went Red), however the city is pretty much like SF/The rest of CA with the oppressive liberal attitude.

Some suburbs on LI in particular that aren't insanely expensive are Franklin Square, Levittown, Sayville, Massapequa Park, Seaford, and Oceanside are all good contesters.

I know you said you like the outdoors which may be an issue because for the most part LI is pretty flat, however the North Shore is beautiful, and the South Shore beaches are awesome during the summer. Plus plenty of cool stuff to do like Jones Beach Concerts on the water, going out east to visit cute towns like Montauk, Hamptons, Greenport, etc.
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Old 04-26-2017, 09:56 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,522,521 times
Reputation: 2305
Quote:
Originally Posted by tman7117 View Post
I'd honestly recommend some NYC suburbs. Long Island for the most part is pretty moderate politically (Nassau leaned Democrat and Suffolk went Red), however the city is pretty much like SF/The rest of CA with the oppressive liberal attitude.

Some suburbs on LI in particular that aren't insanely expensive are Franklin Square, Levittown, Sayville, Massapequa Park, Seaford, and Oceanside are all good contesters.

I know you said you like the outdoors which may be an issue because for the most part LI is pretty flat, however the North Shore is beautiful, and the South Shore beaches are awesome during the summer. Plus plenty of cool stuff to do like Jones Beach Concerts on the water, going out east to visit cute towns like Montauk, Hamptons, Greenport, etc.
The outdoors for my wife and I can mean a number of things. If we can't hike, at least having the water nearby would help. We both enjoy paddle boarding & kayaking
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