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Old 04-29-2017, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,793,965 times
Reputation: 9469

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TU08nola View Post
Really great info! I took the cities everyone's mentioned, did some flight searches and found r/t Chicago for less than $80 (that's insane). So I'm going to start there, check it out, and report back!

I also realize I'll be getting pleasant Chicago weather and will have to keep that in mind. Any suggestions (for Chicago or when scoping out cities in general) for how to get the best read on living there vs. being a tourist there? I've started thinking of things like, "Don't just visit The Bean, but also notice things like amenities, does it seem to be dog-friendly, etc."
When we were searching for a new city, we didn't want to fall in love with a city or particular neighborhood, only to find out later we couldn't afford to live there. So, prior to our visits, we contacted a realtor in each city and asked if they would spend a few hours with us "window shopping" current housing stock for sale. The carrot was that if we later declared our intent to move to their city, they would be our realtor. All were more than happy to show us around. By and large, realtors are friendly people who love their city and simply enjoy looking at real estate.

I realize you can spend your time researching housing stock on Zillow, but in many instances, the images of any given property you see on your iPad can be misleading once you actually see the property in person.

Last edited by Pine to Vine; 04-29-2017 at 02:34 PM..
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Old 05-01-2017, 01:44 AM
 
3,048 posts, read 1,795,532 times
Reputation: 1153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
In what universe is downtown Miami on the same level as CC Philly and downtown Boston?

And downtown LA doesn't belong with SF and DC.
Downtown Philly>Downtown NY>Downtown Boston>Downtown SF>Downtown Los Angeles>Downtown Portland>Downtown Chicago>Downtown DC>Downtown San Diego>Downtown Miami
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Old 05-02-2017, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Dallas
29 posts, read 28,818 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
When we were searching for a new city, we didn't want to fall in love with a city or particular neighborhood, only to find out later we couldn't afford to live there. So, prior to our visits, we contacted a realtor in each city and asked if they would spend a few hours with us "window shopping" current housing stock for sale. The carrot was that if we later declared our intent to move to their city, they would be our realtor. All were more than happy to show us around. By and large, realtors are friendly people who love their city and simply enjoy looking at real estate.

I realize you can spend your time researching housing stock on Zillow, but in many instances, the images of any given property you see on your iPad can be misleading once you actually see the property in person.
Good point! No point researching a neighborhood I couldn't live in. I plan on renting rather than buying, but good to keep in mind if I need to buy out of town in the future.
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Old 05-06-2017, 09:52 PM
 
149 posts, read 93,158 times
Reputation: 132
Philadelphia for sure!
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Old 05-06-2017, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,914,959 times
Reputation: 35196
Whoa, you guys are all forgetting to mention humidity! The window for pleasant time outside in all of those towns - other than San Diego - is really short. Anywhere east of the Rockies will have a tiny window in spring and fall that is pleasant. The rest of the time, you are dealing with a long winter, and a humid, hot summer.

Once you've lived in a dry climate, you just can't go back.

In Portland, you can't plan any outdoor activity, including a BBQ in your backyard, without an indoor back-up plan. And this is year round. You just can't count on even the weather forecast saying it should be nice on Saturday, etc. Because you just never know. I lived in that area for many years, and up into Seattle and Bellingham, too.

Same thing when I lived in Nashville, TN. You can be sure it will be humid and you have your BBQ anyway. Then, along comes the random thunderstorm, and everyone scrambles out of the pool, and it pours down rain, lightening hits the tree in the backyard that splits and crashes into your BBQ - lol - I lived through it! And then the humidity goes through the roof from the thunderstorm.

I only miss the fireflies.

San Diego is the only real choice. Nice, dry weather most of the year and where you can trust the forecast and rarely have to worry about the weather messing with your outdoor BBQ.

Then, go vacation in those humid places.

By the way, the less humidity, the smaller the bugs...
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Old 05-07-2017, 02:17 PM
 
3,215 posts, read 1,541,554 times
Reputation: 2332
Built environment and predominant housing variety also might play in this mix. No city is as the Row-home King city. Continuous blocks of many times identical row-homes is common. Center City has it Colonial-era versions too.

That alone is kind of a polar opposite to Dallas. When debating cities by winters? To boast East Coast winters more mild then the Midwest? Overall yes. But each year is different in severity. They have winters with snow. Some years worst then most. DC south is when winter's really start to moderate more.

Portland cloudy weather is a norm that is rarely different. Cloudy days common do effect people and I am one. Of course you can't beat San Diego for weather.

I love Chicago as a city built with a Urbanity that made little concession to green-space among its neighborhoods , but embraced it fully yet urban (American-style urbanity). I'm not overly in praising of Philly. Only because I'm no big fan of row-homes (raised among them) and less green-frontage. So Philly for me I might not be first? But clearly a option for NOT being Dallas. I'm not a fan of cloudy days. I do find too many have a depressing effect on me. So Portland is iffy for me but never rule it out.

For Urban experiences that are not just a Concrete-Jungle Urban but green too .............. Chicago.
For a opposite style of city living from Dallas with housing most different in these cities ... Philly
For a city with the youngest vibe and but least amount of sunshine but green ................ Portland
Win overall as #1 in weather, not lacking in green and of course sun and some urbanity .. San Diego

My comments on theses cities are in general. Not to declare the whole city is in my short assessments and merely opinions.
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Old 05-07-2017, 06:08 PM
 
149 posts, read 93,158 times
Reputation: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Whoa, you guys are all forgetting to mention humidity! The window for pleasant time outside in all of those towns - other than San Diego - is really short. Anywhere east of the Rockies will have a tiny window in spring and fall that is pleasant. The rest of the time, you are dealing with a long winter, and a humid, hot summer.

Once you've lived in a dry climate, you just can't go back.

In Portland, you can't plan any outdoor activity, including a BBQ in your backyard, without an indoor back-up plan. And this is year round. You just can't count on even the weather forecast saying it should be nice on Saturday, etc. Because you just never know. I lived in that area for many years, and up into Seattle and Bellingham, too.

Same thing when I lived in Nashville, TN. You can be sure it will be humid and you have your BBQ anyway. Then, along comes the random thunderstorm, and everyone scrambles out of the pool, and it pours down rain, lightening hits the tree in the backyard that splits and crashes into your BBQ - lol - I lived through it! And then the humidity goes through the roof from the thunderstorm.

I only miss the fireflies.

San Diego is the only real choice. Nice, dry weather most of the year and where you can trust the forecast and rarely have to worry about the weather messing with your outdoor BBQ.

Then, go vacation in those humid places.

By the way, the less humidity, the smaller the bugs...

Philadelphia has a long winter?

I'm from Upstate NY, sorry, I just have to laugh hysterically at that.

Philadelphia winters are nothing.
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Old 05-07-2017, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,914,959 times
Reputation: 35196
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalentedDrinker View Post
Philadelphia has a long winter?

I'm from Upstate NY, sorry, I just have to laugh hysterically at that.

Philadelphia winters are nothing.
Compared to what? San Diego?
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Old 05-07-2017, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,908 posts, read 12,520,941 times
Reputation: 2631
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalentedDrinker View Post
Philadelphia has a long winter?

I'm from Upstate NY, sorry, I just have to laugh hysterically at that.

Philadelphia winters are nothing.
There are geographical boundary lines where winter gets your attention. Philly is cold . Once you get into central Pa and into the Pocono mountains you hit another level of frigidity, like how and why do people live here?

Then you hit NY the Catskills, Adirondacks and it insanely cold. You have to be nutz to live in upstate NY.


The past couple winters were mild in Philly.

To me Seems like Summer is getting pushed into mid/late October I have spent many days on the South Jersey beaches in October the last few years that was unheard of in the past, Fall is getting pushed back to mid/late December, couple months of moderate winter Jan-Feb(highs in 30's) then you begin to come out of it in March.
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Old 05-08-2017, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
28 posts, read 14,564 times
Reputation: 38
Philly... but I'm biased. The NW section of the city has one of the best urban parks in the country (Wissahickon), and the neighborhoods on either side are great places to live. From there, Center City is just a short train ride away, and in that general area is where you'll find some of the most important landmarks in American history, as well as a plethora of great museums, and plenty of music venues.

The rent in most areas is fairly reasonable as far as cities go, and while I would never want to dissuade someone from coming here, it's important to take into account the wage tax (which is a bit on the high side), as well as property taxes (which are actually comparatively low).

Philly just barely meets the criteria necessary to be considered humid subtropical. That means that the winters are generally mild, but I'm not gonna lie... I can't stand January/February, it's too cold. The spring, summer, and fall are generally sunny with a good amount of rain from time to time. The summer can be humid, but it's never really bothered me.

Places like San Diego & Portland will be completely different than Philly, in terms of culture, vibe, etc. These days, it feels as though the West Coast has a culture completely foreign to some places on the East Coast. I spent some time in L.A., and it seemed like there were a lot of people from Texas, and most seem to get along quite well out there. One final benefit: we don't have those silly California accents.
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