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Old 05-08-2017, 08:10 AM
 
149 posts, read 93,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phillyjawns View Post
Philly... but I'm biased. The NW section of the city has one of the best urban parks in the country (Wissahickon), and the neighborhoods on either side are great places to live. From there, Center City is just a short train ride away, and in that general area is where you'll find some of the most important landmarks in American history, as well as a plethora of great museums, and plenty of music venues.

The rent in most areas is fairly reasonable as far as cities go, and while I would never want to dissuade someone from coming here, it's important to take into account the wage tax (which is a bit on the high side), as well as property taxes (which are actually comparatively low).

Philly just barely meets the criteria necessary to be considered humid subtropical. That means that the winters are generally mild, but I'm not gonna lie... I can't stand January/February, it's too cold. The spring, summer, and fall are generally sunny with a good amount of rain from time to time. The summer can be humid, but it's never really bothered me.

Places like San Diego & Portland will be completely different than Philly, in terms of culture, vibe, etc. These days, it feels as though the West Coast has a culture completely foreign to some places on the East Coast. I spent some time in L.A., and it seemed like there were a lot of people from Texas, and most seem to get along quite well out there. One final benefit: we don't have those silly California accents.

100% agree here.

Wissahickon is amazing, and that's not even considering that Philadelphia is the botanical garden capital of the US. Over 30 in the metro area.

Philadelphia is very green!
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Old 05-08-2017, 09:27 AM
 
3,215 posts, read 1,541,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TalentedDrinker View Post
100% agree here.

Wissahickon is amazing, and that's not even considering that Philadelphia is the botanical garden capital of the US. Over 30 in the metro area.

Philadelphia is very green!
I count the green in the actual neighborhoods most important. Some cities have their tree-canopy right in their blocks. That's a HUGE PLUS to me. I want a dense to moderately dense with green-frontage as standard.

If a city has far less green in its neighborhoods I'm still less impressed because it has forest preserves as huge parks. I want WALKABILITY with able to go out my door and homes have green across the block and if landscaped and flowers a plus.

If too much of the city? Is homes to the sidewalk? It becomes hotter as the concrete heats it all with little to absorb some. William Penn wanted ALL his Philly to be a "Greene Countries Towne". I'm not sure if he would see he got that? Many sidewalks alone are big enough to add green. It does make a difference in Urban living. Trees add plenty but having more green adds value to any block.

So if comparing cities? The typical housing variety to green-space in its neighborhoods can matter in assessing the character. Over amount of park space alone.

There are cities virtually every neighborhood is green outside all homes. Some have extremes from a neighborhood in a forest to many far less. Just some trees not evenly across blocks still fall short more then not.

Much defends on the importance to live among green for you? Even if there are plenty of suburbs if you want more
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Old 05-08-2017, 10:29 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
3,475 posts, read 4,369,941 times
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I grew up in and around Philadelphia and I will second those who say the winters aren't that big a deal, but of course that depends on individual tolerance for cold and occasional snow. Summer humidity bothered me more than the winters.
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Old 05-09-2017, 03:19 PM
 
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Budget??? For San Diego, bring $$$$...BAGS of it!
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Old 05-12-2017, 08:06 PM
 
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Final conclusion: Philly takes all
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Old 05-18-2017, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Dallas
29 posts, read 28,818 times
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Reporting back on Chicago. There were a lot of things I liked--I loved the mix of big city, parks, beaches, etc. It felt like a lot of mini-cities in one. It's been over 10 years since I was in NYC, but I kept thinking, "This is a much cleaner, more polite, less crowded New York". I spent the most time in the Wicker Park area, but Lakeview seemed to have the best mix of grocery stores, restaurants, shopping etc. from my brief time there.

One thing I kept feeling though, was it didn't feel very "lively". Maybe I was in the wrong places. I had beautiful weather the entire time; chilly but sunny and clear, so people shouldn't have been hibernating. I wandered through Old Town and Lincoln Park over the weekend, and it was dead quiet. I went out to several bars on Division St in Wicker Park Saturday night, and there were people there, but it was pretty mellow. Same with dinner in Bucktown and Logan Square on Sunday and Monday nights.

Is my perception just off base? I just felt like a city this size would have a lot more bustle, more buzz, etc. Not that I want to be crammed in by a press of people, but one of the things I enjoyed about living in New Orleans and now Dallas, is that there are a lot of areas that have very festive (for lack of a better word) vibes. Lots of people on the patios, walking from bar to bar, etc.
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Old 05-18-2017, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,843 posts, read 2,973,256 times
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Very diverse choices. GL OP


I think you're a winner either way, but I think living in a dense east coast city should be a part of everyone's experience. That's where I would go. You're young enough to pivot later.

Last edited by Gaylord_Focker; 05-18-2017 at 08:02 PM..
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:41 AM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,433,244 times
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Yes, definitely Philly!
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Old 05-19-2017, 12:26 PM
 
3,215 posts, read 1,541,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TU08nola View Post
Reporting back on Chicago. There were a lot of things I liked--I loved the mix of big city, parks, beaches, etc. It felt like a lot of mini-cities in one. It's been over 10 years since I was in NYC, but I kept thinking, "This is a much cleaner, more polite, less crowded New York". I spent the most time in the Wicker Park area, but Lakeview seemed to have the best mix of grocery stores, restaurants, shopping etc. from my brief time there.

One thing I kept feeling though, was it didn't feel very "lively". Maybe I was in the wrong places. I had beautiful weather the entire time; chilly but sunny and clear, so people shouldn't have been hibernating. I wandered through Old Town and Lincoln Park over the weekend, and it was dead quiet. I went out to several bars on Division St in Wicker Park Saturday night, and there were people there, but it was pretty mellow. Same with dinner in Bucktown and Logan Square on Sunday and Monday nights.

Is my perception just off base? I just felt like a city this size would have a lot more bustle, more buzz, etc. Not that I want to be crammed in by a press of people, but one of the things I enjoyed about living in New Orleans and now Dallas, is that there are a lot of areas that have very festive (for lack of a better word) vibes. Lots of people on the patios, walking from bar to bar, etc.
Glad you had a good trip and weather in Chicago. You clearly hit its great points. If you claim not the elbow to elbow shove you aspect of NYC? Don't expect that in Chicago. It again, chose to rebuild a New "Second City" unlike NYC with no tenements and very few areas or a full block of tight alike row-homes as Philly.

If it seemed much quieter then Dallas? I'd be more inclined to believe you did not hit the more lively festive areas of bars or clubs. River North neighborhood in downtown might have had more of what you wanted. I see downtown Chicago and the city more in general? To be more a Class Act and higher-end bars and clubs in the near downtown neighborhoods . Roof-top brew house to wine bars and Craft beer bars you claimed you like such beers. The cities neighborhoods surely have their local neighborhood bars and dives. Great restaurant scene for sure.

http://wgntv.com/2017/05/18/chicago-...ty-in-america/

Chicago named best restaurant city in America right now

http://www.cntraveler.com/gallery/be...nts-in-chicago

If you go again? Surly seek out the most vibrant areas and seek recommendations in the Chicago forum on C-D. You want more green-frontage housing and old neighborhoods with a tree-canopy (in the neighborhoods)? Chicago surely will meet and surpass expectations. Much less so in Manhattan. If you prefer attached rows and no need for green-frontage a city built with standard set-backs required? Maybe much of Philly has less. No doubt it makes up much in huge forested parks. But many neighborhoods are less green in lower green-frontage with no setbacks. But low-scale row-homes are not the multi-residential tenements of Manhattan either.

Definitely visit Philly to see if does offer more of a NYC, New Orleans vibe you prefer and the other cities. Seek on C-D most exiting areas of the cities you next visit to on the city forums on C-D before you visit.

Last edited by DavePa; 05-19-2017 at 12:40 PM..
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