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View Poll Results: Most like England?
Boston, MA 69 49.29%
Portland, ME 14 10.00%
Providence, RI 5 3.57%
New York City, NY 8 5.71%
Philadelphia, PA 24 17.14%
Washington, D.C. 4 2.86%
Pittsburgh, PA 3 2.14%
Other (please write) 13 9.29%
Voters: 140. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-25-2017, 09:38 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,151 posts, read 1,555,946 times
Reputation: 1877

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Also to mention, The Labor Day Carnival (NYC), Caribana (Toronto) and The Notting Hill Carnival (London) are some of the largest West Indian Carnivals in the world, attracting over a million visitors.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notting_Hill_Carnival
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caribana
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_Day_Carnival
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Old 04-26-2017, 06:47 AM
 
105 posts, read 61,834 times
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Don't really see how Boston triple deckers and vinyl siding screams London. What rowhouses are there?

Philadelphia is more like London to me than Boston is.

Something tells me 13 people haven't actually been there and are just going along with stereotype. I mean, someone voted based on an opinion of someone else for **** sake. Come on.
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Old 04-26-2017, 06:49 AM
 
105 posts, read 61,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3587...7i13312!8i6656

Here's a Boston neighborhood. Definitely looks American, or rather "east coast" to be more specific, but you can clearly see some British influence at the same time.

Which, also looks like Philadelphia..
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Old 04-26-2017, 06:52 AM
 
105 posts, read 61,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayVanderbilt View Post
Yes actually looks very British. Could be in Glasgow or Edinburgh.

Which is why Glasgow was used for filming Philadelphia in movies.
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Old 04-26-2017, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
7,019 posts, read 12,583,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILiveInAmerica View Post
Don't really see how Boston triple deckers and vinyl siding screams London. What rowhouses are there?

Philadelphia is more like London to me than Boston is.

Something tells me 13 people haven't actually been there and are just going along with stereotype. I mean, someone voted based on an opinion of someone else for **** sake. Come on.
I started out in Ireland was raised in Metro Boston. I've been to London dozens of times. It takes more than row houses to give off the feeling of England. Boston is the closest in vibe to London, or to Europe for that matter in the US. Your free to see it as you do, and the rest of us as we do. There is a reason there are so many British, Irish and and Italian trasnsplants in Greater Boston. A little bit of the vibe and feel of England or places mentioned, and populations of their homeland to connect with. There is a reason the region is called New England, and Boston is its Capitol. There are row houses in Boston. In the Back Bay has a number of them. Also Beacon Hill.
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Old 04-26-2017, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,553 posts, read 12,095,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILiveInAmerica View Post
Don't really see how Boston triple deckers and vinyl siding screams London. What rowhouses are there?

Philadelphia is more like London to me than Boston is.
Only Boston's core neighborhoods (Beacon Hill, North End, South End, Bay Village, Back Bay, Bay Village, and parts of Charlestown) are dominated by attached brick structures. The next ring of neighborhoods out are either dominated by small brick apartment buildings or detached wood structures (single family or small multi-family like triple-deckers).

I agree that in terms of built form Philly feels way more like a British city than Boston, in large part because like a British city, Philly never really stopped building attached housing, so you see analogous terrible mid-century rowhomes in both places. Also Philly has a lot more surviving rowhouses in its core from the 18th and early 19th century than Boston, where the core neighborhoods were basically "upzoned" during the Victorian era. Thus there are whole streets with almost identical building styles to parts of London.
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Old 04-26-2017, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,653 posts, read 8,418,436 times
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I live in the borough of Southwark near the Camberwell area (used to live in the City near the Holborn Station but moved a few months back) here in London and am a resident of London that's been to all of the American cities on the poll, even lived in one of them (Washington D.C.). Most people commenting in this thread are definitely reaching or haven't really been to London.

The correct answer is none of the above. The cities are way too different in a multitude of ways for there to be anything substantial in common other than a superficial similarity aspect here or there.

Last edited by Trafalgar Law; 04-26-2017 at 09:29 AM..
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Old 04-26-2017, 09:46 AM
 
105 posts, read 61,834 times
Reputation: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob1 View Post
I started out in Ireland was raised in Metro Boston. I've been to London dozens of times. It takes more than row houses to give off the feeling of England. Boston is the closest in vibe to London, or to Europe for that matter in the US. Your free to see it as you do, and the rest of us as we do. There is a reason there are so many British, Irish and and Italian trasnsplants in Greater Boston. A little bit of the vibe and feel of England or places mentioned, and populations of their homeland to connect with. There is a reason the region is called New England, and Boston is its Capitol. There are row houses in Boston. In the Back Bay has a number of them. Also Beacon Hill.
You're aware Boston isn't the only place with them, right?

Philadelphia has the second largest population of these groups in the US.
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Old 04-26-2017, 09:50 AM
 
814 posts, read 945,265 times
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If we can break it down to specific neighborhoods, Chatham Village in Pittsburgh was designed to feel like English "garden city."











And there are some places in, say, rural Virginia (Upperville first place that comes to mind) that feel like they could be a quaint country setting in England.
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Old 05-24-2018, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Montreal
736 posts, read 858,030 times
Reputation: 313
Default Montreal just might be most "British" city in North America

I don't necessarily suppose that anyone has thought of my native Montreal in terms of being among the most "British" cities in North America. But at least in the older and wealthier neighbourhoods in Montreal - such as Westmount, Outremont, Notre Dame de Grace (NDG), and Montreal West - that might indeed be the case, at least architecturally. (Despite Outremont mainly being francophone in population, even as the others are mainly anglophone.) Here are some examples:

Westmount:

1) https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.48611...7i13312!8i6656

2) https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.48677...7i13312!8i6656

3) https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.48542...7i13312!8i6656

Outremont:

1) https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.51503...7i13312!8i6656

2) https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.51309...7i13312!8i6656

NDG:

1) https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.47723...7i13312!8i6656

2) https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.47813...7i13312!8i6656

3) https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.47745...7i13312!8i6656

Montreal West:

https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.45467...7i13312!8i6656
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