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Old 04-26-2017, 09:41 PM
 
5,430 posts, read 2,830,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
The grass is always greener. The flat, flyover rural midwest doesn't get much love on this site but I find the generic rural farmland to be beautiful. The sky and land go on forever.
The prairies are beautiful on an early spring day, when the mountains are still cold and snowy, and the newly-strengthening sun feels gentle.
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Old 04-26-2017, 10:35 PM
 
4,486 posts, read 2,670,613 times
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Every single day of my life I see beautiful things, because I look down a hill toward water and there are hills and mountains (if it's clear) beyond that. And because I work in a building with a view.

I'd never give up having scenery. Though in fairness a city can be scenic even if it's flat, and several years living in a desert city gave me an appreciation for beauty in small doses.
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Old 04-26-2017, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,192 posts, read 2,645,001 times
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One interesting thing about CO, an acclaimed natural setting superstar, is that our state is phenomenal for grand views, but actually pretty boring/ugly at the micro, or close up level. If you just took a 100 sqft piece of CO land, its generally not pretty and very monoculture.

Grand views are for the most part innate. Most everyone can look at a snow covered Pikes Peak and see beauty. But seeing beauty at the micro level, the leaves, flowers, insects, birds, rocks, and how they change is a more learned form of beauty.

So while CO has the grand view beauty, I actually find myself somewhat starved of micro scale beauty and little things to look at here. When I go to a forest in the eastern US, I get really excited at how much there is to see if you look beyond just the immediate surface a bit.

A lot of the US (including places like IL if the entire state wasn't turned into a corn field) has access to this micro level beauty, but a lot of people don't seem to pay much attention to this and instead look for the grand views.

Last edited by Phil P; 04-26-2017 at 11:15 PM..
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Old 04-26-2017, 11:53 PM
 
4,486 posts, read 2,670,613 times
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I view Boulder as scenic if you're looking west. Denver itself has some trees and a distant brown backdrop but I don't find it attractive. Every city in the western US has a backdrop and most are either closer or more interesting if not both. Many cover a lot of the 360.
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Old 04-27-2017, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,403,138 times
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Even in cities without a spectacular backdrop you can still appreciate beauty in parks/botanical gardens, ornate architecture and landscaping, sunsets, fall foliage (depending on the location) etc.
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Old 04-27-2017, 01:11 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,201 posts, read 10,420,399 times
Reputation: 11214
I enjoy being around trees, so couldn't imagine living in a desert area. Otherwise, it's not vastly important.
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Old 04-27-2017, 09:01 AM
 
5,430 posts, read 2,830,519 times
Reputation: 10176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
One interesting thing about CO, an acclaimed natural setting superstar, is that our state is phenomenal for grand views, but actually pretty boring/ugly at the micro, or close up level. If you just took a 100 sqft piece of CO land, its generally not pretty and very monoculture.

Grand views are for the most part innate. Most everyone can look at a snow covered Pikes Peak and see beauty. But seeing beauty at the micro level, the leaves, flowers, insects, birds, rocks, and how they change is a more learned form of beauty.

So while CO has the grand view beauty, I actually find myself somewhat starved of micro scale beauty and little things to look at here. When I go to a forest in the eastern US, I get really excited at how much there is to see if you look beyond just the immediate surface a bit.

A lot of the US (including places like IL if the entire state wasn't turned into a corn field) has access to this micro level beauty, but a lot of people don't seem to pay much attention to this and instead look for the grand views.
Wow, our former home in the foothills was beautiful right in its little microclimate nook. We had a few distant views of the high peaks, but the right-there-around-us setting was gorgeous without the distant views. The wild animals that passed through apparently agreed.
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Old 04-27-2017, 09:10 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,139,658 times
Reputation: 1850
Born in Colorado and lived here most of my 61 years. Yes it's a beautiful place, and many can't seem to get here fast enough. Almost the entire Mountain West (UT, NM, ID, MT, WY, have areas that look just like it. As a native, I've never seen what all the fuss is about. Maybe I'm getting old and cranky. I've traveled to 45 states extensively and have found beauty in each.

Don't beat me up, just my personal opinion. I usually get slammed if I mention anything negative about my home state.
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Old 04-27-2017, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Austell, Georgia
2,145 posts, read 3,034,383 times
Reputation: 2011
Natural Beauty is nice but is not the "end all be all". If the price is right I could be happy living in the middle of a cornfield. Family, job, demographics, and even weather would come before natural beauty IMHO.
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Old 04-27-2017, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Monument,CO
352 posts, read 291,697 times
Reputation: 554
I'm proud to not be an outdoors type. I'm a born and bred New Yorker in exile, so I don't care if I'm driving past the 14000 foot mountains out here or across the flat dreariness of the neighboring states. You've seen one mountain, you've seen em all.
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