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Old 05-06-2017, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Olympia, Washington
1,258 posts, read 697,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
his is an true and natural urban (city proper) Philly accent, which sounds Northeastern to the core.

https://youtu.be/DsKyqsSmyqk
Yes this is the accurate accent. But it's not "northeastern" to the core. You can definitely hear the southern influence. It was immediately noticeable to both myself and my fiancee when we went there from NYC. I imagine anyone from further up north such as myself will also be able to hear it. That said, I imagine anyone from further south would say it's not southern at all lol.
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Old 05-06-2017, 01:22 PM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,594,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffydelusions View Post
Yes this is the accurate accent. But it's not "northeastern" to the core. You can definitely hear the southern influence. It was immediately noticeable to both myself and my fiancee when we went there from NYC. I imagine anyone from further up north such as myself will also be able to hear it. That said, I imagine anyone from further south would say it's not southern at all lol.
There's is an Midland influence present, but not an southern influence. There is a difference between the two. Also present is Canadian raising which makes the accent even more distinctive. However, overall the accent is a Northeastern sounding accent though with slight commonalities with other regions.
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Old 05-07-2017, 02:50 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach/Norfolk, VA
116 posts, read 278,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Snoop is from Baltimore, so although her accent is extremely heavy, it is an authentic Baltimore accent.

She probably has heaviest Baltimore accent that I've ever heard, and I'm born and raised here.
True! She really has that two/do =tew/dew and brova/favre accent heavy. I think the comedian Monique has a heavy African American B-more accent also.

Edit: Does anyone watch the show Empire? The Lyons family is supposed to be from North Philly and live in NY but the only actor that has close to the accent is Yaz (because he is from Philly) and his accent is Philly-lite. I heard Terrance Howard is from Chicago but his accent has strong southern roots and Taraji has a D.C accent.

Last edited by sevenfiveseven; 05-07-2017 at 03:09 AM..
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Old 05-07-2017, 06:03 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,792,885 times
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Miamians often gets played by Hollywood as caricatures of Mexican Americans dressed like tourists in Hawaii. Fail all around. I've never ever heard a good Miami accent on screen.
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Old 05-07-2017, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 574,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Lol, I posted about that yesterday on another thread. I am 58 years old, have lived in NJ all my life, and I've yet to meet a person from NJ who says Joisey.
Wow, so not even people raised in the 50s were saying it that way. Wonder where the stereotype even came from.
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Old 05-07-2017, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,881 posts, read 10,379,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevenfiveseven View Post
True! She really has that two/do =tew/dew and brova/favre accent heavy. I think the comedian Monique has a heavy African American B-more accent also.

Edit: Does anyone watch the show Empire? The Lyons family is supposed to be from North Philly and live in NY but the only actor that has close to the accent is Yaz (because he is from Philly) and his accent is Philly-lite. I heard Terrance Howard is from Chicago but his accent has strong southern roots and Taraji has a D.C accent.

T Howard has actually lived in the Philly area for a while in Lafayete Hill-wonder what the connection is, if any.
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Old 05-09-2017, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,004 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.J240 View Post
Wow, so not even people raised in the 50s were saying it that way. Wonder where the stereotype even came from.
You used to hear it in old movies like the Bowery Boys, New Yorkers referring to NJ as "Joisey" because that's the way THEY said it, and after WWII and then again in the 1960s during "white flight", scads of people from New York City flooded northern New Jersey, and some of them may have spoken that way.

I am at least the fifth generation born in New Jersey. No one said Joisey, not grandparents, no one.

Except for some areas in Hudson County (across the river from New York City, like Jersey City, Bayonne, or Hoboken), people in New Jersey clearly pronounce the R. We say New YoRK, not New Yawk. And even those who don't in the areas above are now mostly an older generation that is dying out.

We do say "cawfee" and "tawk", though!
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Old 05-09-2017, 04:39 PM
 
34 posts, read 15,285 times
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The accent of the so-called ”Joisy” pronunciation is still prevalent in all around NY state, you just have to develop an ear for it. There are conflicting infos whether this unique accent came from New Jersey, Brooklyn or the Bronx originally. In some linguistic literature it’s being referred as the old Irish-NYC accent.

I’m from Eastern-EU but I love learning about accents and this type of old-school NYC accent is my absolute favourite. It doesn't only appear in the old movies, it's still pretty alive and well, but it can't be narrowed down into a certain neighborhood or borrough anymore.

In the video examples below you will hear that one of the most curious characteristics of this special accent is that the letter "R" is pronunced as "OI" (bird - boid, church – choich, morning - moining). This special non-rhotic character is very different from the classic british variety. If anyone has insights about how it developed this way, please share.

You guys from the NY area should be proud of such a special accent and preserve it. It's such a unique and somewhat funny accent which is easy on the ear. On the other hand, I find most British accents of today (the cockney accent for example) to be very irritating.


Here are a couple of examples from Youtube that I collected, the content is irrelevant, just listen to the accent (the speakers are from Brooklyn, Jersey, Bronx, Brooklyn and Jersey - in this order):


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBBoU7aLvHA


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPs0GLd2bV0


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25u6ErUPeMo


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PmuojAky-s


A Parody of the ”Joisy” accent from a local:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXApQFNlWSE
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Old 05-09-2017, 06:43 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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I grew up near NYC, the only speakers that said "Joisy", "bird" must be very old; can't remember hearing it. R-dropping is alive and well, though has faded.

KAUFMAN: People used to say Thoity-Thoid (ph) Street for 33rd Street, goil (ph) for girl in New York City English. And that is actually almost completely dead.

WANG: Well, not quite, says 79-year-old Donald Semenza.


New York Is Losing The Accent That Gave It 'Toidy-Toid Street' : NPR
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Old 05-09-2017, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,004 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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That first accent in the YouTubes above sound like my friend's brother. He'd be about 50 now, Irish descent, became NYPD and then retired early. They grew up in Washington Heights and then moved northward into Inwood, the northernmost part of Manhattan. It almost sounds like a speech impediment.

The kid in the second one, I'm not sure. Wondering if he's from Queens, but I also wondered if he could be from Bayonne, NJ.

Third one says they're in the Bronx.

The fourth guy could possibly be from New Jersey. He says his Rs clearly. InteRnet, TwitteR, not Intanet and Twittah.

The last guy is just a goof, but it demonstrates that there's this weird stereotype of speaking that does not really exist.
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