U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-05-2017, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
124 posts, read 207,004 times
Reputation: 164

Advertisements

I would say that Salt Lake meets the criteria for being polarized because of the religious aspect. Salt Lake County is very divided between the LDS community versus the non-LDS community. People who are not LDS such as myself tend to stay within the SLC city limits, as it has become a Non-LDS and liberal haven in an otherwise LDS and conservative community. I have heard people say they will not go "South of 21st" because it gets to LDS. The same goes for the LDS community, most of them live in the suburbs, and when they come into the city they tend to only go to one block for religious purposes and go back to the suburbs. Not to mention, daily life conversations can center around these differences and seems to come up much more than other areas I have lived. That being said, it creates an interesting dynamic and a sort of counterculture here in the SLC that would be unexpected.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-05-2017, 09:25 AM
 
9,948 posts, read 6,881,760 times
Reputation: 4221
Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
Yep - Detroit is so polarized. It was really hard to get used to when I first moved to the area about 15 years ago.

To a lot of people, what side of 8 mile you live on is REALLY important.

And to others, what county or town you live in is REALLY important.

Which car brand you drive is also a big one with people of my father's generation. (He's currently not thrilled that I drive an "import". Even though my 'import' was made in Indiana and a lot of the "domestics" have way more foreign parts than mine does).

Some people really don't know how to talk to you if you don't understand how to speak the language of division. I, often, had to ask my spouse what exactly do you mean by "east side" or "west side" or why are people making a big deal about where someone else lives. There's being divided, but the way that the Metro area talks and behaves is really excessive at times. It's really bizarre for someone like me who grew up being taught not to judge people by their skin color or where they live or whatever.

"Invisible" lines are really important here. Disturbingly so.

Even in smaller cities that I've lived in weren't this bad when it comes to polarization.

I go back to my hometown and literally laugh when my dad starts talking about the bad side of town because there are parts of the Metro that are so much worse (and it's tolerated!)

My husband worked in Milwaukee for awhile and noted some of the division that Milwaukee has. However, it would take a lot for it to even come close for it to be on par with Detroit.

It's really just disturbing the government tries to talk and work towards a more regional system and the people in many of the suburbs are really against it - even it's in our best interest to work together on some of these things. It's really an instant reaction (for some) to say let Detroit die - we don't care what goes on down there. Even though it's the biggest city in our state.

Things have gotten marginally better over the years because there's the regional board that meets now, but the physical and psychological divisions that people have created a lot more harm than good.

A lot of it can really be traced back to the '67 riot. The riot in Chicago during the 1960's didn't seem to have the same effect on their city as the riot in Detroit had on our region. People still poured into LA, even though the Watts burned. So while a similar event occurred in the same time frame - why did these cities still thrive and Detroit didn't? (Remembering that Detroit had millions of people in the core city).

So - yeah - put me down for as "another vote" for Detroit.
The riots did have a big impact.....but the election of an outspoken black mayor (Coleman A. Young) as the first black mayor of Detroit.....really sent whites fleeing to the suburbs. The paranoia of whites was exemplified when Coleman Young told all criminals and hustlers to hit 8 mile (meaning get out of town). Many white residents thought he was telling the criminals to go rob people in the suburbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 09:38 AM
 
9,948 posts, read 6,881,760 times
Reputation: 4221
I would say that the Great Lakes areas, by far, is the most poloraized area of the country and its major cities are among or the worst offenders. Surprisingly, the relaxing of lending standards for homes and using mortgages as Wall Street investment (CDO's) created a new era of integration in many inner-ring suburbs formerly racially paralyzed. However, that integration is just a interim stage from the shift from being mostly white to being mostly blacks, for example, Harper Woods and East Pointe, MI.

Regions of the country that got over half their population in the last 30 years tend to be less segregated because the new growth often keeps lines in the sand from being drawn. However, sometimes newcomers follow existing lines in the sand, as in the case of Metro Atlanta between the North and South sides. Slow growth older metro areas, like in the Great Lakes region, have polarization patterns formed decades ago.

Interestingly enough....this neat little map just came to my attention today. SocScape - USA
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 11:04 AM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
Reputation: 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
I can't speak for DTX, but Arlington is slowing down progress for public transportation.

Also, they want to be treated like a major city, but don't have any of the basics that would qualify it to be so...
That pretty much sums it up. The arguments against public transit there was to prevent the "undesirables" from traveling to there. Are they that clueless? Look around most of Arlington... the undesirables are already there. They just have a bigger ego than the other declined DFW "sprawlburbs." Pretty much the "Banana Republic" of DFW. And it's really embarrassing that they are often the face of here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 1,160,209 times
Reputation: 2321
Nashville has the best racial interactions of any city I ever lived in, NYC and Boston was pretty good as well but that was due to the fact I worked at a hospital and had a lot of friends that were Asians, Middle East and Latinos and we are all professionals. I grew up Cincinnati it was not getting good growing up in the 90s but has gotten better. Cincinnati, Detroit, Memphis and Chicago are the worst I have seen but all cities have some it more to economics than race. Lot of black doctors and nurses I know live in the burbs because they can afford a bigger home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,749,193 times
Reputation: 8803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanderbiltgrad View Post
Nashville has the best racial interactions of any city I ever lived in, NYC and Boston was pretty good as well but that was due to the fact I worked at a hospital and had a lot of friends that were Asians, Middle East and Latinos and we are all professionals. I grew up Cincinnati it was not getting good growing up in the 90s but has gotten better. Cincinnati, Detroit, Memphis and Chicago are the worst I have seen but all cities have some it more to economics than race. Lot of black doctors and nurses I know live in the burbs because they can afford a bigger home.
What does this mean?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 11:56 AM
 
1,826 posts, read 1,248,326 times
Reputation: 1822
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
That pretty much sums it up. The arguments against public transit there was to prevent the "undesirables" from traveling to there. Are they that clueless? Look around most of Arlington... the undesirables are already there. They just have a bigger ego than the other declined DFW "sprawlburbs." Pretty much the "Banana Republic" of DFW. And it's really embarrassing that they are often the face of here.
One of your major complaints was that DART has to focus money on the suburbs, which takes away funds from Dallas, so shouldn't you be happy that a large, sprawling suburb, as in Arlington, didn't join?

Also, not a fan of Arlington, but is it really in decline? I can't speak much for it, but it seems most suburbs around me are improving; Addison, Plano, Frisco, Richardson, Denton, Carrollton, even Farmers Branch and Lewisville somewhat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,955 posts, read 22,099,030 times
Reputation: 10687
Quote:
Originally Posted by berger123 View Post
I would say that Salt Lake meets the criteria for being polarized because of the religious aspect. Salt Lake County is very divided between the LDS community versus the non-LDS community. People who are not LDS such as myself tend to stay within the SLC city limits, as it has become a Non-LDS and liberal haven in an otherwise LDS and conservative community. I have heard people say they will not go "South of 21st" because it gets to LDS. The same goes for the LDS community, most of them live in the suburbs, and when they come into the city they tend to only go to one block for religious purposes and go back to the suburbs. Not to mention, daily life conversations can center around these differences and seems to come up much more than other areas I have lived. That being said, it creates an interesting dynamic and a sort of counterculture here in the SLC that would be unexpected.
I'm not sure if this post is based on first hand experiences or not, but my guess is that it isn't. While the central city area definitely is more non-LDS than the suburbs, the idea that it's an us versus them kind of thing simply isn't true. I live in Cottonwood Heights, which -- at least for the purpose of this thread -- would be considered a suburb of Salt Lake City. There are 12 households on my street. Four of them are LDS families; eight are not. On the street just behind us (the street where the backyards of the homes meet our backyard), there is not a single LDS family. If non-Mormons won't go south of 21st South, they're the ones who are encouraging the polarization you're speaking of.

Every year, our street has a neighborhood barbeque and pot luck and almost everybody attends and thoroughly enjoys themselves. It's absolutely nonsense to think that when Mormons go into the city, it's "just to one block for religious purposes and then back to the suburbs." We Mormons like to go shopping in Salt Lake City's incredibly downtown mall, to the summer farmers market just outside of the downtown area, to the symphony, plays, baseball games and Jazz games -- just like everybody else, if you can imagine such a thing. Oh, and I'm pretty sure there are a fair share of non-LDS who venture into the suburbs to attend Real Salt Lake soccer games, etc.

Salt Lake City also has an openly lesbian mayor who is married to her partner. She, incidentally, was elected by all the people of Salt Lake City, not just the non-Mormons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,558 posts, read 743,963 times
Reputation: 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
I'm surprised no one has mentioned Atlanta. Northern Atlanta and Southern Atlanta feel like two different worlds in many areas.

I don't know many residents south of the city (south Atlanta, airport area, South Fulton, southern Dekalb, Clayton Co, etc) who venture into northern ends, and I definitely doubt many northerners (Johns Creek, Alpharetta, Marrietta, Gwinnett, Roswell, Brookhaven, etc) often find themselves in the southern area on purpose.

Part of that is distance - if you live in Peachtree City, going to Alpharetta could be a day trip. But then part of it is just socioeconomic stigmas.

Northern Atlanta is more white and wealthy while the south is more black and middle class. Roswell and Alpharetta are much different than Riverdale and College Park. Northern Atlanta appears more professional with edge cities and office towers and condos, while southern Atlanta is more service and not as dense, more single family housing instead. Apparently the northern areas are more republican, and the southern areas more democratic.

IDK if there is visible "animosity", but northern Fulton has continuously tried to succeed from the rest of Fulton for various reasons.
Fulton County's shape is rather incoherent in the context of contemporary metro Atlanta. It extends from affluent exurban areas like Milton in the far north to much less prosperous outer suburbs like Fairburn and Palmetto in the far south, while in the center is about 90% of the city of Atlanta (the remainder is actually in DeKalb County), and just a little north is Sandy Springs which has one of the largest concentrations of high-end office space in the South. There are a lot of different sections in Fulton that are far removed geographically from each other and don't have too much in common, which likely helps the (so far unsuccessful) movement to divide the county.

I think the political division around Atlanta is more the center vs. outskirts of the region rather than north vs. south, however. I-285 was traditionally a dividing line, but the more Democratic areas are spilling over into additional suburban communities as their diversity increases. This has caused the once solidly Republican 6th congressional district in the northern suburbs (site of a special election runoff next month) to become increasingly competitive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 09:17 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,247 posts, read 19,171,479 times
Reputation: 7005
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
That pretty much sums it up. The arguments against public transit there was to prevent the "undesirables" from traveling to there. Are they that clueless? Look around most of Arlington... the undesirables are already there. They just have a bigger ego than the other declined DFW "sprawlburbs." Pretty much the "Banana Republic" of DFW. And it's really embarrassing that they are often the face of here.
Grapevine and North Richland Hills are getting on the ball. Even Denton has a REAL bus system AND commuter rail, and that's a small college town. It's pathetic.

Maybe with Texas Live! developments coming with the new ballpark and continued talks of high speed rail, they'll finally change their minds.... hopefully.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top