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Old 05-01-2017, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,409,763 times
Reputation: 2093

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In your opinion which metro area is the most polarized?

By this I mean

-residents rarely venture to other sections of the metro area
-significant cultural division
-stark demographic differences (race, religion, income, age etc.)
-political polarization
-animosity/rivalry between different sections of the metro
-inability to function effectively as a single region i.e. regional projects are stifled due to debate among municipal governments in the metro area.
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Old 05-01-2017, 08:30 PM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,300 posts, read 3,324,431 times
Reputation: 4517
Chicago!

The northside is mostly middle or upper class whites. Once you reach a certain point in the city, it's like a completely different world. Some parts of the southside feel like a small town in rural Alabama. Nothing but run down homes and a Dollar General.

People on the northside always say "the crime is only in certain neighborhoods" and "we have no reason to go there". They just pretend like those areas don't exist.

Also, the segregation is VERY apparent here, and this is coming from someone who was born and raised in NC.

I very rarely see any black people in my neighborhood, but if I drive 5 minutes south, I'm the only white person in sight.
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Old 05-02-2017, 02:13 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 17,998,336 times
Reputation: 14678
I'd say Pittsburgh and Atlanta have pretty stark political contrasts in their metropolitan areas. The city of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County are increasingly liberal, while the balance of the metropolitan area is increasingly conservative. As for Atlanta, the city proper and most inner suburbs (near or inside I-285) are increasingly liberal, but most outer suburbs and the entire exurban fringe remain strongly conservative.
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Old 05-02-2017, 04:30 AM
 
3,976 posts, read 3,510,114 times
Reputation: 6405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
In your opinion which metro area is the most polarized?

By this I mean

-residents rarely venture to other sections of the metro area
-significant cultural division
-stark demographic differences (race, religion, income, age etc.)
-political polarization
-animosity/rivalry between different sections of the metro
-inability to function effectively as a single region i.e. regional projects are stifled due to debate among municipal governments in the metro area.
I don't know how people wouldn't say Detroit. It's gotten better over the last 15 years, but from the 70s-90s I don't think any single metro area could come anywhere close to it in this regard. Detroit lost 50% of it's population while it's suburban population almost doubled. Anyone who says Detroit's decline was due to the auto industry doesn't understand the history, or the collapse of the city after the 1967 riots. It's suburbs walled themselves off from Detroit and acted as if it didn't exist. If you were to tell a person from Farmington Hills they were from Detroit, they would quickly correct you and be offended. This is still somewhat the case today. The lack of regionalism and political warfare are the reason the area lacks amenities in comparison to other 4million+ metros. Although the region has started to figure it out and is shifting.
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Old 05-02-2017, 05:25 AM
 
56,846 posts, read 81,192,796 times
Reputation: 12570
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I don't know how people wouldn't say Detroit. It's gotten better over the last 15 years, but from the 70s-90s I don't think any single metro area could come anywhere close to it in this regard. Detroit lost 50% of it's population while it's suburban population almost doubled. Anyone who says Detroit's decline was due to the auto industry doesn't understand the history, or the collapse of the city after the 1967 riots. It's suburbs walled themselves off from Detroit and acted as if it didn't exist. If you were to tell a person from Farmington Hills they were from Detroit, they would quickly correct you and be offended. This is still somewhat the case today. The lack of regionalism and political warfare are the reason the area lacks amenities in comparison to other 4million+ metros. Although the region has started to figure it out and is shifting.
A good example of this is when East Detroit changed its name to Eastpointe during that time period. Farmington Hills is actually be one of the more integrated Detroit suburbs historically, but your point is so true.

Milwaukee is another area that comes to mind.
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Old 05-02-2017, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,719 posts, read 9,660,847 times
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I would go with Chicago.
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Old 05-02-2017, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Maryland
4,275 posts, read 5,504,463 times
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As far as smaller metros are concerned, Madison, WI is pretty polarized East-to-West
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Old 05-02-2017, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,892 posts, read 3,013,278 times
Reputation: 3440
Core Austinites hates anything outside of their little circle.

I don't notice any hate in the DC area among residents.
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Old 05-02-2017, 06:35 AM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,249 posts, read 19,215,026 times
Reputation: 7010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
In your opinion which metro area is the most polarized?

By this I mean

-residents rarely venture to other sections of the metro area
-significant cultural division
-stark demographic differences (race, religion, income, age etc.)
-political polarization
-animosity/rivalry between different sections of the metro
-inability to function effectively as a single region i.e. regional projects are stifled due to debate among municipal governments in the metro area.
Sounds like DFW to me...
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Old 05-02-2017, 06:49 AM
 
Location: New York City
5,747 posts, read 5,136,412 times
Reputation: 2869
There was an article I read last year (I forget which publication) that showed the most segregated metros in the country based on minorities vs. whites by location and income rates. Philadelphia and Chicago were far in the lead. So those are your answers for that criteria.
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