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Old 05-10-2017, 09:23 AM
 
5,436 posts, read 2,830,519 times
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I heard that pronunciation way back in the 60s when my family took a trip to NYC. My father asked directions; the guy he asked said, "Toin the coinuh..."

It was one of the Br neighborhoods, Brooklyn or the Bronx.
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Old 05-10-2017, 09:55 PM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
76 posts, read 53,698 times
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uff da - Dakotas and Minnesota
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Old 05-11-2017, 12:11 AM
 
429 posts, read 317,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Hella = Bay Area
Bay Area has more recognizable regional slang than anywhere else I'm aware of.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rq0ZDnshYkU


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pIQq2T-PkZM
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Old 05-11-2017, 07:13 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,179 posts, read 660,336 times
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As a native New Englander, my Philly friends always comment on how I use "wicked" as an adjective for a lot of things. I also call a sub/hoagie/whatever a "grinder". Always have, always will.

As for Philly, "Jawn" is a dead giveaway, especially amongst working/lower class people.
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Old 05-11-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,093 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
LOL I like that!
It has an apostrophe! I didn't realize.

https://djeetcatering.com/
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Old 05-11-2017, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,093 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
I heard that pronunciation way back in the 60s when my family took a trip to NYC. My father asked directions; the guy he asked said, "Toin the coinuh..."

It was one of the Br neighborhoods, Brooklyn or the Bronx.
Sometimes they insert the "R" into the "oi". Or used to. I was working in a DIY store about 40 years ago, and someone came to my register with a flat, rectangular box. It had a brand name on it, but I couldn't tell what was inside. The customers said it was on sale, and back then, we looked in the flyer to verify if things were on sale.

I started looking, but I didn't know what I was looking for, so finally I asked, "What is this?" The woman looked at me as if I was a moron and said, "It's a terlet seat!"
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Old 05-11-2017, 10:40 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
797 posts, read 1,159,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Sometimes they insert the "R" into the "oi". Or used to. I was working in a DIY store about 40 years ago, and someone came to my register with a flat, rectangular box. It had a brand name on it, but I couldn't tell what was inside. The customers said it was on sale, and back then, we looked in the flyer to verify if things were on sale.

I started looking, but I didn't know what I was looking for, so finally I asked, "What is this?" The woman looked at me as if I was a moron and said, "It's a terlet seat!"
This is a feature of the New Orleans accent too. Terlet, aluminum furl, berl (boil), my uncle oil (earl) put earl (oil) in his car. One of my favorites is erster for oyster. Not as common as it used to be but you still here these pronunciations around. Apparently it is called the coil-curl merger.

You'll also see adding and taking away r's too, as in my friend Donner (Donna). Plus in New Orleans its called red gravy for tomato sauce, not just gravy but red gravy.

This is a fun list that someone did. How ta tawk rite
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Old 05-11-2017, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
2,438 posts, read 4,225,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michigan Transplant View Post
Back in my Jr. High school days, a history teacher in my Detroit school who was from Pennsylvania referred to a rubber band as a "gum band."
Yes, "gumband" is a Pittsburgh word. Also from Pittsburgh is "red up" for "clean up".

I wish someone would do some research like they did on soda/pop/coke to see what people call the receptacle that your groceries go into after being scanned - is it a bag or a sack? It was always a bag when I was younger and living in the northeast, but here on the west coast I've been asked if I want a sack about half the time.
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Old 05-11-2017, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,093 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo_1 View Post
This is a feature of the New Orleans accent too. Terlet, aluminum furl, berl (boil), my uncle oil (earl) put earl (oil) in his car. One of my favorites is erster for oyster. Not as common as it used to be but you still here these pronunciations around. Apparently it is called the coil-curl merger.

You'll also see adding and taking away r's too, as in my friend Donner (Donna). Plus in New Orleans its called red gravy for tomato sauce, not just gravy but red gravy.

This is a fun list that someone did. How ta tawk rite
My Maine-born MIL called her own daughter Donner. But she would pahk the cah and eat cahn on the cob.
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Old 05-11-2017, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,093 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Allen View Post
Yes, "gumband" is a Pittsburgh word. Also from Pittsburgh is "red up" for "clean up".

I wish someone would do some research like they did on soda/pop/coke to see what people call the receptacle that your groceries go into after being scanned - is it a bag or a sack? It was always a bag when I was younger and living in the northeast, but here on the west coast I've been asked if I want a sack about half the time.
I've never heard it called a sack in real life, but I've heard of it on threads like this. One woman I worked with, from Bayonne, called her bags of groceries "bundles". She brought in the bundles from the car. I was picturing her food wrapped in brown paper and tied with string.
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