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Old 05-16-2017, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,093 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
"All set?" and "All set." ...as both a question and an answer in New England.
This is interesting. I recently asked on the Writing forum if anyone knew of a source to check whether the phrase "all set" was in use in the 19th century. We use it here in NJ, as well. One of my characters said it, and I wondered if it was historically accurate.

I was surprised to find that it is limited to the northeast. I thought it was used everywhere.

Did find out the answer to my base question is no. It appears in the 1930s. That's an edit.
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,029 posts, read 23,924,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TalentedDrinker View Post
Im from Upstate. Utica. Mohawk Valley.

Utica says "youse" or "youse guys". It's a staple. Definitely because of Utica's notorious working class Italian population.

Soda as well. East of Syracuse is soda. West is pop.
Wilkes-Barre checking in. Mom and grandma said pocketbook, we had a cellar, and we ate supper when dad got home from work. Quite a few said youse (youz!).

I learned putz from the Jews, and it meant that you were a doof.

While it seems there were many influences from Philadelphia, many of the people had been through New York before settling there. First, second, and third generation held their preferences and speech patterns.

You had to be careful about identifying people. The Russians, Poles, Lithuanians, didn't want to be lumped into one group. The English, Irish and Welsh? That would have been nasty.

I also grew up with heynabonics. Pretty much from the Eastern European crew.
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Old 05-17-2017, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Illinois
989 posts, read 595,645 times
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Frunch-room is a dead giveaway for a very old-school, bungalow-dwelling Chicagoan.

It means "front room", describing the room in the front of the house that looks out onto the front lawn. Most would consider this the living room.

<<<He's waiting for you in the "frunchroom".>>>>

My dad used this term all the time - grew up on the south side.
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Old 05-17-2017, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,513 posts, read 1,602,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmanshouse View Post
Frunch-room is a dead giveaway for a very old-school, bungalow-dwelling Chicagoan.
I live in Chicago, and I heard the term "front room" only once. Interestingly, it was used by someone in their late 20's, who did not live in a bungalow or the South Side. The word was pronounced normally, not "frunchroom".

All other times, it's was "living room" or "hall", or wherever the entrance door led.
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Old 05-17-2017, 11:55 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
3,483 posts, read 4,374,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michgc View Post
I thought of another Philadelphia one. If you have a grandmother named "MomMom" then you (or she) are probably from Philadelphia. I don't think any other part of the country uses that term for grandmother. Phladelphians use "PopPop" too for grandfather, but I think that term is common in other parts of the country as well.
Wow. I didn't know that was local. That's another Philadelphia-ism I grew up with.
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Old 05-17-2017, 12:01 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
3,483 posts, read 4,374,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Before that, outside of Italian families, few people ate much pasta except for spaghetti and meatballs, which was something your mother made to stretch the money near the end of a pay period.
I'm not Italian, but my mom made spaghetti and meatballs because we liked it--a lot. She also made lasagna. You're probably right though about "pasta" as a generic term not being that common in the 70s.
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Old 05-17-2017, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,093 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApartmentNomad View Post
I'm not Italian, but my mom made spaghetti and meatballs because we liked it--a lot. She also made lasagna. You're probably right though about "pasta" as a generic term not being that common in the 70s.
My mother made lasagna, too. We are not Italian. As an adult, I asked her for the recipe because hers was so good. She said, "It's on the back of the Ronzoni box."
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Old 05-17-2017, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Maine
398 posts, read 1,163,845 times
Reputation: 219
In Colorado, and other western states, they say "guys's", and it drives me crazy. An example would be, "Is this one of your guys's bags"? Up in the mountain area's they'd also say "heighth" instead of "height", and foot instead of feet. "Who all" was another different one for me. I worked at a high school, and the kids would say things like, "who all is gonna be there"?

I never realized "skeevy" was a regional/Italian term (originally from CT). I know I've used that term in CO, but I don't think anyone ever asked me what it meant.
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Old 05-17-2017, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Illinois
989 posts, read 595,645 times
Reputation: 1092
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I live in Chicago, and I heard the term "front room" only once. Interestingly, it was used by someone in their late 20's, who did not live in a bungalow or the South Side. The word was pronounced normally, not "frunchroom".

All other times, it's was "living room" or "hall", or wherever the entrance door led.
This must be generational then. My dad and everyone he knew said this. Grew up in Roseland in the 60s. I have heard it a few other times from others.

While potentially not common, if you DO say "frunchroom" you are DEFINITELY from Chicago.
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Old 05-17-2017, 10:51 PM
 
45 posts, read 15,245 times
Reputation: 77
"Freeway"- California
"Hella"- Northern California (particularly the San Francisco Bay Area)
"The [insert expressway number here]"- Southern California (particularly Los Angeles)
"Wicked"- New England (particularly Boston)
"Hero"- sub sandwich, New York City metropolitan area
"Hoagie"- sub sandwich, Philadelphia
"Po'boy"- sub sandwich, Louisiana
"Mischief night"- New York City metropolitan area/northern New Jersey
"Devil's night"- Detroit
"Tree lawn"- Cleveland
"Gym shoes"- Chicagoland (although according to the New York Times Dialect Quiz, Cincinnatians also use this term.)
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