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Old 05-30-2017, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,513 posts, read 1,602,908 times
Reputation: 4405

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Quote:
Originally Posted by michgc View Post
People in Philadelphia refer to William Penn as Billy Pen as if we are best buds with him. I don't think anyone else in the country is on a familiar basis with Billy Penn as we are.
Too funny! I heard that in Springfield, IL, the opposite is true with Abraham Lincoln: you're supposed to keep a respectful distance. Calling him Abe is looked down upon. The proper names to call him are Abraham, Mr. Lincoln, or Pres. Lincoln.
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Old 05-31-2017, 08:18 PM
 
417 posts, read 117,143 times
Reputation: 831
Many southerners say "hey" for hi or hello. It seems to irk many a norther who moves down. When I say "hey" to a northerner, I often get the response "HAY is for horses!" said with indignation. I explain that its hEy not hAy, and that it's a colloquialism that has been used in the south for over a hundred years. Just last week, I greeted someone in the morning with a cheerful "hey". She responded with "My name is not HAY, my name is KAREN!" So, I said "OK...Hey...Karen". She didn't seem to see the humor in it.
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Old 05-31-2017, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 1,163,901 times
Reputation: 2321
Southern women have a language all to themselves. They have a million You Tube videos on this.
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Old 05-31-2017, 08:30 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,842 posts, read 18,861,423 times
Reputation: 33748
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffydelusions View Post
If you say grinder or dunks you are from New England. Also if you know what the big e is.
Western MA. In the eastern part of the state (Bawston) they say sub and they have no idea what the Big E is.
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Old 06-01-2017, 12:06 PM
 
Location: The Left Toast
1,195 posts, read 1,447,790 times
Reputation: 865
JAWN......Philly.
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Old 06-01-2017, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,064,736 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApartmentNomad View Post
I seriously thought "mischief night" was universal in the U.S.
Nope. We never had a word for it. At worst, Halloween eve.
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Old 06-01-2017, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,737,517 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by addakisson View Post
Many southerners say "hey" for hi or hello. It seems to irk many a norther who moves down. When I say "hey" to a northerner, I often get the response "HAY is for horses!" said with indignation. I explain that its hEy not hAy, and that it's a colloquialism that has been used in the south for over a hundred years. Just last week, I greeted someone in the morning with a cheerful "hey". She responded with "My name is not HAY, my name is KAREN!" So, I said "OK...Hey...Karen". She didn't seem to see the humor in it.
People say hey here all the time too. I think it's only a select kind of person who takes some kind of offense. I also think most people who reply with "hey is for horses" are just being snarky, not serious.

Snark is something I discovered to be commonly taken as funny in the north, and taken as insulting in the south. I think a lot of southerners are not aware that most snark is just humor to us, not actual complaints.
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Old 06-01-2017, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,093 posts, read 54,581,442 times
Reputation: 66490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenses & Lights. View Post
JAWN......Philly.
What does it mean?
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Old 06-01-2017, 10:38 PM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,596,597 times
Reputation: 1073
Quote:
Originally Posted by agun77 View Post
"Freeway"- California
"Hella"- Northern California (particularly the San Francisco Bay Area)
"The [insert expressway number here]"- Southern California (particularly Los Angeles)
"Wicked"- New England (particularly Boston)
"Hero"- sub sandwich, New York City metropolitan area
"Hoagie"- sub sandwich, Philadelphia
"Po'boy"- sub sandwich, Louisiana
"Mischief night"- New York City metropolitan area/northern New Jersey
"Devil's night"- Detroit
"Tree lawn"- Cleveland
"Gym shoes"- Chicagoland (although according to the New York Times Dialect Quiz, Cincinnatians also use this term.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Circle - New Jersey
Rotary - New England
Roundabout - everywhere else

Expressway - NYC region
Freeway - most other places, I think

Jughandle - New Jersey
WTF is this? - Everywhere else
It's called a "circle", and "mischief night" in Philly as well.
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Old 06-05-2017, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Arizona
295 posts, read 204,455 times
Reputation: 593
Gym Shoes is apparently a Chicago thing. Didn't know until I went to college. I've never really used "sneakers"

One of my best friends in college was from NYC and he used a lot of different words and sayings.

"Mad". He used it like "very". "It's mad cold out here."
"Bet". Used to confirm something.

"I'll see you at the library in a couple of hours."
"Alright, bet."
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