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Old 09-03-2018, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,730,726 times
Reputation: 5374

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hickoryfan View Post
I'm late to the party and too many pages to read to see if this has been said. Dadgum! Heard my father say it first. I never heard the word used in TV or the radio. It's a southern thang.
Aaaaaactually, "Dadgum" and "Dadgummit" might be more of a rural thing? I grew up hearing it from my grandpa who is a native of the Adirondacks.

It might just be more common in the south.

The reason I am a bit uncertain is that that same grandpa had a very good friend from South Carolina. So it may have been passed on from a southerner.
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Old 09-03-2018, 09:53 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,983 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
The pop/soda/coke divisions are oddly random. It's not West vs East (people in Washington say pop, people in California say soda), and it's not really North vs. South either.

Here's a map: https://laughingsquid.com/soda-pop-o...united-states/
Just got back from a trip to Minneapolis. We went to a baseball game and I asked a worker at the stadium where I could get a soda. He said "What?" I replied "Pop. Soft drink."
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Old 09-03-2018, 09:56 PM
 
1,528 posts, read 1,493,661 times
Reputation: 1509
Detroit slang:

Doorwall = Sliding glass door
Hi-low= A forklift
Michgan Left= U-turn
Party Store= Liquor Store
Two-Tracker= A bonfire in the unbeaten path
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Old 09-04-2018, 11:09 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,720,777 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I had a roommate in college from Norfolk, VA. He used the word "reckon" a lot, much the way movie cowboys and the sheriff of Mayberry do.
Me: "I might go out for a beer after I finish studying." Him: "Ya reckon?"
Him: "I reckon I'll ace my philosophy essay".
Him: "Reckon it's gonna rain, better bring your UMbrella with you."

PS: thanks for indulging me my so many posts in a row. This thread really got me going!
I reckon that reckon is fairly common in the upper South, westward to both sides of the Ohio River valley. At least I have heard it a lot in southern Ohio and Indiana.
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Old 09-04-2018, 11:59 AM
 
6,465 posts, read 4,066,328 times
Reputation: 16667
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I reckon that reckon is fairly common in the upper South, westward to both sides of the Ohio River valley. At least I have heard it a lot in southern Ohio and Indiana.
I was really surprised when I found out how normal and unremarkable "reckon" is in British English.
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Old 09-04-2018, 12:04 PM
 
21,185 posts, read 30,343,833 times
Reputation: 19595
My late Mom was from south central Indiana and always referred to a creek as a "crick" or to "warsh" (versus wash) your hands. My guess from hearing it among others from that area is that it extends west to east, more or less along the Ohio River Valley..??
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Old 09-04-2018, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon (in Transition)
881 posts, read 438,805 times
Reputation: 1443
"Spendy", "Donchya know", "Ya betchya"
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Old 09-04-2018, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
7,992 posts, read 16,048,592 times
Reputation: 9332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
My Garmin GPS has "trip options" you can set to customize your route, such as "Avoid toll roads". One of the settings is "Avoid highways", which puzzled me at first. How do I drive anywhere out of the city by avoiding highways? Fly? Take a train? After a while I figured out they were using the term "highway" to mean Interstates. Apparently, Magellan never heard of two lane highways! But now you've got me thinking it's a regional thing!
My girlfriend from Vermont refers to essentially any numbered route (even one that resembles a rural back road) as a highway. However, here in Eastern Massachusetts, it only refers to any controlled access highway. Not necessarily just interstates, because there are plenty around here that don't have interstate distinctions (i.e. Route 3, 24, sections of routes 2 and 1, etc.), but controlled access highways. Anything less than that is not a highway (at least locally).
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Old 09-04-2018, 03:37 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,983 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
My girlfriend from Vermont refers to essentially any numbered route (even one that resembles a rural back road) as a highway. However, here in Eastern Massachusetts, it only refers to any controlled access highway. Not necessarily just interstates, because there are plenty around here that don't have interstate distinctions (i.e. Route 3, 24, sections of routes 2 and 1, etc.), but controlled access highways. Anything less than that is not a highway (at least locally).
Ditto my husband from Nebraska, if it has a number on it; e.g. State Route 15, is "Highway 15".
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Old 09-04-2018, 04:36 PM
 
2,016 posts, read 1,013,828 times
Reputation: 2662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Just got back from a trip to Minneapolis. We went to a baseball game and I asked a worker at the stadium where I could get a soda. He said "What?" I replied "Pop. Soft drink."
I've lived in Wisconsin a while, and have only heard "soda" here. Weird that Minnesota is so different.
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