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Old 09-07-2018, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,843 posts, read 36,203,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michgc View Post
Oh wow, I say "Ga head" too. I'm from Philadelphia but am the first in my family born there - everyone else in my family (parents, siblings, grandparents, etc.) was from New York City, so it's possible I picked it up from them. Now I wonder if it's a NY thing or if Philly people do that as well.

I don't say my double t's. So Kitten comes out like ki-in, Mitten is Mi-in (not quite that bad, there's a little bit of a "t "in there). When I went away to college, I became friends with some girls from Baltimore. They used to make fun of how I said those words. I never even realized I did that. I'm pretty sure it's a Philly thing.
Oh my gosh, I always wondered where that idiosyncracy came from!
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Old 09-07-2018, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,101 posts, read 4,739,224 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwalker96 View Post
I know for NY it's words like Son, Mad, Wylian, Odee, What's good, Ayo, Deada**,B,Snuff,Sonnin,Blowin Minds,Dub,My Ni**a.
I'm only familiar with the usage of Son, Mad, Deada**, and Ayo. The others must be more urban.

We do share a commonality with Massachusetts in that people also describe things as "wicked".
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Old 09-07-2018, 11:51 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33075
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Yinzers!

I was not aware that "Yunz" was also prevalent in parts of the south. It can be heard in pockets of rural western NY as well. Especially Allegany and Cattaraugus counties, and perhaps Steuben to a lesser extent.
Had no idea they say that in upstate NY! It figures, it's Appalachia there, too.
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Old 09-07-2018, 02:20 PM
 
545 posts, read 93,264 times
Reputation: 542
I'll jump in here to mention arriving in Middle TN quite a while back (now about to leave) and really found it hilarious when people would call a soda/pop/Coke a "cold drink" and "short pants" for shorts. Also, being originally from the West Coast and Midwest, interstates were called freeways (usually turnpike in the midwest and not free) and when giving directions, it was "get on the 101" or "take the 405" but in mid-TN, they are usually highways and "the" is replaced with "I-24, I-40..."
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Old 09-07-2018, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,101 posts, read 4,739,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Had no idea they say that in upstate NY! It figures, it's Appalachia there, too.
Aye. I hypothesize that it may have came here with Pennsylvanians long, long ago. It still happens to this day, but especially back in the 1800's and early 1900's people from PA and NY have traded places quite a lot (ultimately leading to the whole idea of the twin tiers taking root). Large numbers of rural Pennsylvanians moved to western and central NY for work over time.

One of the biggest pieces of remaining evidence of this northwards movement is the town of Penn Yan in Yates county. It is short for "Pennsylvania-Yankee", and came about due to the large number of Pennsylvanians and people from eastern NY and Massachusetts settling together in the area.

Today the twin tiers has a lot of families on both sides of the border. My own included. Language habits have been shared for certain.
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Old 09-07-2018, 04:30 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
356 posts, read 109,282 times
Reputation: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I'm only familiar with the usage of Son, Mad, Deada**, and Ayo. The others must be more urban.

We do share a commonality with Massachusetts in that people also describe things as "wicked".
Yeah NYC has a lot of slang it varies between borough and ethnicity. The words I listed is primarily used by Black NY'ers.
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Old 09-07-2018, 05:42 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33075
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Aye. I hypothesize that it may have came here with Pennsylvanians long, long ago. It still happens to this day, but especially back in the 1800's and early 1900's people from PA and NY have traded places quite a lot (ultimately leading to the whole idea of the twin tiers taking root). Large numbers of rural Pennsylvanians moved to western and central NY for work over time.

One of the biggest pieces of remaining evidence of this northwards movement is the town of Penn Yan in Yates county. It is short for "Pennsylvania-Yankee", and came about due to the large number of Pennsylvanians and people from eastern NY and Massachusetts settling together in the area.

Today the twin tiers has a lot of families on both sides of the border. My own included. Language habits have been shared for certain.
It's the Scotch-Irish heritage, too. Interesting history of the name Penn Yan. I always wondered about that.
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Old 09-07-2018, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,101 posts, read 4,739,224 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
It's the Scotch-Irish heritage, too. Interesting history of the name Penn Yan. I always wondered about that.
Absolutely! As well as Dutch.
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Old 09-07-2018, 09:31 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,053,448 times
Reputation: 3485
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Yinzers!

I was not aware that "Yunz" was also prevalent in parts of the south. It can be heard in pockets of rural western NY as well. Especially Allegany and Cattaraugus counties, and perhaps Steuben to a lesser extent.
Up in Rochester (NOT part of NY's Appalachia), a common colloquialism is to pronounce "you" as "yih" (as opposed to "ya" as in much of the rest of the country.) For example, if I went over to my friend's house by myself, he'd greet me with, "How are yih?" If I showed up with my brother, he'd use the plural, "How are yiz?". So, "yiz" = "yinz" = "youse" = "y'all", to show a few variations of the plural of "you".
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Old 09-07-2018, 09:46 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,053,448 times
Reputation: 3485
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Nope, I'm from western/central! At the corners of Steuben/Schuyler/Chemung. I know it's not colloquial Western NY, but it's geographically western.

Around here pop and soda just refer to all soft drinks. In fact I honestly hear both interchangeably, sometimes by the same person.

We call "ice cream sodas" floats! Always have. I didn't know there was another name for a float. You learn something new every day.

Yoo-Hoo is definitely still around. I've never heard anybody call it a pop or a soda though. I like it on occasion.
No, a an ice cream soda is not a float. Ice cream sodas get their fizz from carbonated (soda) water and their flavor from syrups (chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, etc. Ice cream floats get their fizz from pop (aka soda). No carbonated water, no syrup. So you can get a root beer float, a Coke float, a Dr. Pepper float, etc. I know this because I used to be a "soda jerk" back in the 70s .

Here's what Wikipedia says about this matter:
"In the United States, an "ice cream soda" typically refers to the drink containing soda water, syrup, and ice cream, whereas a "float" is generally ice cream in a soft drink (usually root beer)."

PS: Glad to hear Yoo-hoo is still around!
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