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Old 09-08-2018, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,068 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63789

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I guess I just missed out! I asked my father about it last night and he says it is absolutely a thing. So, confirmed (not that I ever doubted y'all).

I suppose I ought to hunt it down then!
Haha, have all three - a Coke float, a rootbeer float, and an ice cream soda (maybe Italian creme but what the heck, try whatever you want!). Let us know which one you prefer.

The thing I love about Coke floats is that you can just whip one up at home in about two seconds.
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Old 09-08-2018, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,746,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Haha, have all three - a Coke float, a rootbeer float, and an ice cream soda (maybe Italian creme but what the heck, try whatever you want!). Let us know which one you prefer.

The thing I love about Coke floats is that you can just whip one up at home in about two seconds.
Oh, I've had Coke and Root Beer floats! The ICS is what I never got to try.

Regardless, now I feel like having a float. haha
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Old 09-08-2018, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,068 posts, read 36,285,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Oh, I've had Coke and Root Beer floats! The ICS is what I never got to try.

Regardless, now I feel like having a float. haha
Yeah, now I want to go buy some Bluebell ice cream and some Coke. Both of which are really bad for me. But I may do it anyway.
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Old 09-15-2018, 04:02 AM
 
Location: EPWV
11,068 posts, read 6,210,090 times
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Yes, being from upstate NY, pie and soda threw me for a loop when I first heard that. When we moved to PA and in the military.

Certain place names are pronounced differently. Chili and Charlotte. We could tell who is not from the area by the soft pronounciations of those words. Not quite like the bowl of chili or the city in NC of course, now when traveling around, hopefully we’ll remember where we are and use the right words, or just stumble a tad. Regalning full composure .
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,068 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63789
I remember moving to Columbus, GA and being quite taken aback at two pronunciations in particular: Buena Vista Blvd and Jordan High School. They say "Byooner Vister" and "Jerdin." I swear I didn't even correlate "Jerdin" with "Jordan" High School for the longest time. I thought they had to be two different schools and I couldn't figure out where "Jerdin" was - LOL.

Now that "Byooner Vister" irritated me from the get go though, because I had been living in Texas where that road would have certainly been called "Bwayna Veesta."

But we have our share of strangely pronounced place names too - for instance Gruene - which is "Green." And Bexar County, which is "Bare" basically. And Humble, TX is pronounced "Umble." And Nacogdoches - well, it's "Naco-dochis." Not to be confused with nearby Natchidoches, LA which is pronounced "Nack-i-dish."

Anytime anyone from out of state says "Groin" for Gruene, or "Bex-ar" for Bexar County, or they stumble over Nacogdoches, it's a dead giveaway "You ain't from around here, are ya?"
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Old 09-15-2018, 06:47 AM
 
428 posts, read 131,165 times
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If someone refers to a portable toilet as a "kybo" they are absolutely from (or have spent a lot of time) in Iowa.

A stupid person is often referred to as a "Darrell". I've never heard that outside of Iowa either.
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Old 09-15-2018, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,213 posts, read 54,678,928 times
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Some of these are interesting! I'd be pegged as an out-of-towner from the get-go.

With place names, another one came to mind because I was speaking to someone on the phone yesterday who said it "wrong". Near Albany, New York, is a town called Colonie. No, you don't say "Colony". It is Col-uh-NEE, and if you don't say it that way, the residents sneer at you with disdain.

Then again, we do the same thing in New Jersey with Paramus. Puh-RAM-us. Not Para-moose.
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Old 09-15-2018, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,068 posts, read 36,285,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Some of these are interesting! I'd be pegged as an out-of-towner from the get-go.

With place names, another one came to mind because I was speaking to someone on the phone yesterday who said it "wrong". Near Albany, New York, is a town called Colonie. No, you don't say "Colony". It is Col-uh-NEE, and if you don't say it that way, the residents sneer at you with disdain.

Then again, we do the same thing in New Jersey with Paramus. Puh-RAM-us. Not Para-moose.
My husband and I were in Connecticut a coupla years ago and we went into some little coffee shop. I'm pretty sure that people there could pick up on our Texas accents. Anyway, there was some tea that I was unfamiliar with - it had a strange name (it was the brand name, not the name of the type of tea) and I had never seen that brand before. I ordered it out of curiosity and apparently mispronounced the name, even though I am very well read and generally don't mispronounce things. Not only was the person behind the register (the person working behind a register!) rude and condescending to me, literally rolling his eyes, the people in line behind me actually started snickering. I couldn't believe it!

I wanted to say, "OK, you come on down to Texas and ask me directions to that dance hall that starts with a G. Let's see how well you fare!" Actually, people in Texas wouldn't sneer at them and roll their eyes though.

I disliked Connecticut but we didn't run into any problem, or any blatantly rude, snobbish people once we got to Maine. Just...Wow.
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Old 09-15-2018, 11:40 PM
 
105 posts, read 38,809 times
Reputation: 133
My uncle is from Mississippi and he uses "commode" for toilet and always seems to put Rs' where they don't belong, example:" I'm going to St. Louris" (St. Louis) or " Put that on the taber (table) or roll down the "winder" (window). He is a truck driver and he also says "Ro-wudd" ( yes, two syllables for the word Road) and he somehow slides an R' into the word "Houston" that I can't really spell but have always found hilarious!

Last edited by Bellside High; 09-15-2018 at 11:42 PM.. Reason: Spelling
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,068 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63789
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bellside High View Post
My uncle is from Mississippi and he uses "commode" for toilet and always seems to put Rs' where they don't belong, example:" I'm going to St. Louris" (St. Louis) or " Put that on the taber (table) or roll down the "winder" (window). He is a truck driver and he also says "Ro-wudd" ( yes, two syllables for the word Road) and he somehow slides an R' into the word "Houston" that I can't really spell but have always found hilarious!
I have heard AA people from the Deep South say "HURrah" for "hair." Also, what you're describing as well. They seem to be typically older AA folks, often from small towns or rural areas.

But that's OK because I've also heard some really goofy pronunciations from all over from people of every skin hue. I will never forget the first time I heard someone in Virginia calling a creek a "crik." I thought, "Wait - was that a joke?" No. No, it was not.

I say "route" rhyming with "out." But whenever I talk about Route 66 I always say it like "root."
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