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Old 10-01-2018, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
17 posts, read 5,247 times
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"Yeah no" means no, and "no yeah" means yes in Southern California.
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Old 10-01-2018, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,510 posts, read 1,600,527 times
Reputation: 4400
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehynbot View Post
"Yeah no" means no, and "no yeah" means yes in Southern California.
Mind. Blown.

And in Bulgaria and parts of Greece, nodding your head means no, and shaking your head means yes.
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Old 10-01-2018, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,791 posts, read 36,172,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
Really? Are you sure you're not thinking about a lynx and a bobcat? Mountain lions and bobcats are nothing alike.
I didn't say I was mixing them up - I said I think some people mix them up.
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Old 10-01-2018, 08:47 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,049,839 times
Reputation: 3485
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlb919 View Post
Gum-bands... it's a rubber band to everyone else unless you're from Pittsburgh, then its a Gum-band.
I've heard people here in the Twin Cities call them "elastics".

Another Twin Cityian word I've never heard anywhere else I have lived is calling a traffic light a "semaphore".
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Old 10-01-2018, 08:52 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,049,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moxiegal View Post
"Yins"- Pittsburgh (?)

"Blacktop" MO Ozarks

"runnin' the roads...." Rural Mississippi

"Carry me somewhere....." drive me somewhere....another MS thang

"Yeast donuts".....MS...that's Glazed for everyone else
Always got a kick out of that one. My brother in law, a thousandth generation native of the FL Panhandle, uses that one. One time he offered to "carry me out for a drink". It must be a Southern thing: "Swing low, sweet chariot, comin' for to carry me home" and "Carry me back to old Virginny".
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Old 10-01-2018, 09:52 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,412 posts, read 7,708,904 times
Reputation: 3054
Some in Oklahoma (mostly in more rural locales)...


"get off me" = quit ribbin' me


"just go on and choke it off" = let out all of your flatulence! (one of my favorites!)


"turtles are peakin'" = I'll let you use your imagination on this one!



"Noodlin'" = catfishin' with hands


"Hotter than a bucket of fire ants" = its really hot outside (which in Oklahoma is a lot of the time)



"High as a cat's back" = something cost too much


"Slicker than a hound's tooth" = something polished or clean



"that's a hog" = used to describe a large fish, often a Largemouth Bass


"more than you can shake a stick at" = it means a lot or a bundle


"like a calf lookin' at a new gate" = someone who is confused


"gotta put on the feedbag" = time to eat a lot


"let's roll in the hay" = when it's time to get frisky with that pretty lady


"I'm hankerin'" = I really need/want something, desperation


"walkin' in tall cotton" = someone's making some money
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Old 10-02-2018, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,791 posts, read 36,172,094 times
Reputation: 63452
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
Some in Oklahoma (mostly in more rural locales)...


"get off me" = quit ribbin' me


"just go on and choke it off" = let out all of your flatulence! (one of my favorites!)


"turtles are peakin'" = I'll let you use your imagination on this one!



"Noodlin'" = catfishin' with hands


"Hotter than a bucket of fire ants" = its really hot outside (which in Oklahoma is a lot of the time)



"High as a cat's back" = something cost too much


"Slicker than a hound's tooth" = something polished or clean



"that's a hog" = used to describe a large fish, often a Largemouth Bass


"more than you can shake a stick at" = it means a lot or a bundle


"like a calf lookin' at a new gate" = someone who is confused


"gotta put on the feedbag" = time to eat a lot


"let's roll in the hay" = when it's time to get frisky with that pretty lady


"I'm hankerin'" = I really need/want something, desperation


"walkin' in tall cotton" = someone's making some money
Here in Texas, a lot of these are common. I'll add some from my relatives in Arkansas:

"Cuter than a bug's ear." Really cute.

"Come give me a Yankee dime." Give me a kiss. (one of my favorites because of it's historical connections)

"It's a real frog strangler out there." It's really raining hard outside.

"It's colder than a witch's tit." It's really cold.

"I've been busier than a one armed paper hanger." I've really been busy.

"That cornbread is larrapin'!" The cornbread is delicious.

"He's cruisin' for a bruisin'." He's looking for trouble.

"Well, that's fine as frog's hair." That's really beautiful/delicious/well done/great.

"She's lying like a rug on the floor." She's lying.

"He'd rather walk across the street and tell a lie than stand in one place and tell the truth." He's dishonest.

"I'm fuller than a tick." I can't eat another bite.

"My meat hurts." My muscles are sore.
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Old 10-02-2018, 08:17 AM
 
419 posts, read 128,396 times
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People all over the country say "y'all". Not all that Southern anymore.
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Old 10-02-2018, 08:27 AM
 
1,021 posts, read 1,236,401 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccm123 View Post
"Like" - used in this type of context: "like", she's cool, "like" 'ya know, dude? - heard in Southern California a lot.
This is true of any upper middle/upper class high school in many school districts across the U.S. My daughter goes to one such school, and although I grew up in S. California, I swear that she sounds more like a valley girl with her friends in suburban Chicago than anyone in Encino.
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Old 10-02-2018, 09:23 AM
 
5,553 posts, read 6,981,927 times
Reputation: 2806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post

Another Twin Cityian word I've never heard anywhere else I have lived is calling a traffic light a "semaphore".
I have heard people in Milwaukee call traffic lights "stop and go lights".
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