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Old 10-02-2018, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,735,887 times
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Another local favorite of mine here in my area of NY is a declaration of frustration. Think for example, what would you say after stubbing a toe? "Ah, cats a**!"
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Old 10-02-2018, 01:23 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
1,231 posts, read 507,760 times
Reputation: 1770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justabystander View Post
This is true of any upper middle/upper class high school in many school districts across the U.S. My daughter goes to one such school, and although I grew up in S. California, I swear that she sounds more like a valley girl with her friends in suburban Chicago than anyone in Encino.
Thank you so much for saying this. I hear more people that sound like a stereotypical Californian from a bad movie that have recently moved here, or on vacation here from somewhere far away. None of my friends, or anyone else I know that grew up here really sounds like that at all, kinda funny.

Whenever I meet someone that’s sound like the “surfer” or “valley girl” from movies/tv I immediately ask where they’re from because i know it’s not here.
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Old 10-02-2018, 01:42 PM
 
Location: SC
1,966 posts, read 1,165,936 times
Reputation: 3194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Always got a kick out of that one. My brother in law, a thousandth generation native of the FL Panhandle, uses that one. One time he offered to "carry me out for a drink". It must be a Southern thing: "Swing low, sweet chariot, comin' for to carry me home" and "Carry me back to old Virginny".

IKR= I know right? I have only been hearing this one since I moved back to SC in 2008.
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Old 10-02-2018, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,340 posts, read 14,102,864 times
Reputation: 5958
Quote:
Originally Posted by moxiegal View Post
"Yeast donuts".....MS...that's Glazed for everyone else
I definitely hear the term "yeast donut" outside Mississippi.
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Old 10-02-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: SC
1,966 posts, read 1,165,936 times
Reputation: 3194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxic Toast View Post
I definitely hear the term "yeast donut" outside Mississippi.
I am from Kansas City MO, but lived down in Biloxi/Gulfport MS from 78'-93'. My family claimed I had a southern accent when I returned to live there in 94'. By then, I was well versed in those Southern terms. I tried to speak "Southern" in Kansas City. All I got was weird looks, and then trying to wrack my memory for the words they were expecting.
I am sure you have heard these terms other places. All I can relate to are my own experiences.
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Old 10-02-2018, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Brew City
4,231 posts, read 2,510,875 times
Reputation: 5703
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
I have heard people in Milwaukee call traffic lights "stop and go lights".
I haven't. I would like to meet these people.

I've heard people in Montana call thunder "thunder boomers". It was also the first place I'd heard a truck cap called a "topper".
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Old 10-02-2018, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,177 posts, read 11,785,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moxiegal View Post
"Yeast donuts".....MS...that's Glazed for everyone else
I live in Colorado and have seen these in the store but have to admit that they don't sound terribly appealing



Having read the entire thread, I think people already got anything I was going to say although I was going to go with the Pittsburgh gumband, since I think that is one of the most unique. For a lot of them, even though people often seemed to think a term or expression was specific to their particular area, it frequently wasn't.

Another Pittsburghism is (or maybe was? I've gotten these from my dad who would be in his 80s if he was still alive and he hadn't lived in Pgh for many decades) was buggy for a grocery cart.

That's actually a very interesting regionalism - this has a good display of the different terms and where they are used

Dialect Survey Results
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Old 10-02-2018, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,797 posts, read 36,172,094 times
Reputation: 63458
I have lived all over the southern US and never heard the phrase "Yeast donuts" let alone "yeast rings" so this is definitely a new one on me! All I've ever heard is "glazed donuts." As opposed to say, a cheese danish or bear claw.
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Old 10-02-2018, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,511 posts, read 1,600,527 times
Reputation: 4400
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I have lived all over the southern US and never heard the phrase "Yeast donuts" let alone "yeast rings" so this is definitely a new one on me! All I've ever heard is "glazed donuts." As opposed to say, a cheese danish or bear claw.
I never hear "yeast donuts" in the Midwest/Chicago area, either, except when bakers say it to distinguish them from donuts that don't use yeast.

In my area, people usually say "cake donuts" for dense, crumbly ones, and simply "donuts" for soft, pillowy ones (like Krispy Kremes). "Glazed donuts" is used only as a descriptor for any donuts with glaze on them.
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Old 10-02-2018, 08:48 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,051,512 times
Reputation: 3485
Quote:
Originally Posted by IowanFarmer View Post
People all over the country say "y'all". Not all that Southern anymore.
The only people I hear say y'all outside the South are black people. (Oh yeah, I guess one time at a restaurant in far Southern Indiana, a waiter said to me "Y'all want rah?". But then his thick Southern accent told me he wasn't from Indiana anyway. BTW, I finally figured out he was asking me if I wanted *rye* bread with my meal. )
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