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Old 10-03-2018, 08:35 PM
 
Location: DC metropolitan area
632 posts, read 286,012 times
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If someone calls you couillon, you know you are in southwestern Louisiana.

If someone says, that's a wicked pissah, you know they are from eastern New England, as in Nantucket Island, Maine...
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Old 10-04-2018, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,159 posts, read 11,768,218 times
Reputation: 32142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Then there's those people who pronounce the work iron as uy-run. Not sure where they are from. NYC area?
Nope, definitely not a NYC thing. I mean, maybe someone there says it that way, but it's not the norm.

I'd say more likely a non-native English speaker, sounding it out phonetically.
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Old 10-04-2018, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,980 posts, read 23,891,412 times
Reputation: 30823
Default Is there an English dialect where iron is pronounced 'eye-ron'?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Then there's those people who pronounce the work iron as uy-run. Not sure where they are from. NYC area?
No particular area.

https://www.quora.com/Is-there-an-En...ounced-eye-ron
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Old 10-04-2018, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,214 posts, read 2,503,558 times
Reputation: 5649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
If you are talking about the metal covering some people put over their pickup truck beds, I've always heard it called a "topper" but never a "truck cap"!
Quote:
Originally Posted by IowanFarmer View Post
I've only heard the term "topper" to describe this thing
So perhaps it's Ohio that's the odd man out calling it a cap? When you grow up in an area you assume everyone does things your way. I thought Montanans were weird for saying topper.

For the record, I used to point out to said Montanans that the truck part in question does in fact say cap (I don't remember where). Nowhere does it say topper. I wish I could find a pic.

In my defense, Leer is probably the most popular cap manufacturer and they call it a cap . (They throw in topper for the rest of you but they're all listed under the category TRUCK CAPS)

Truck Caps, Toppers, Camper Shells & Tonneau Covers by LEER | Fiberglass
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Old 10-04-2018, 01:14 PM
 
232 posts, read 70,797 times
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A term which I have heard used in Chicago is 'viaduct.' It refers to a railroad bridge or railroad overpass when the railroad crosses over city streets. I don't know if this use of the word in this context is present in other places.
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Old 10-04-2018, 01:58 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,724,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
The only people I hear say y'all outside the South are black people. (Oh yeah, I guess one time at a restaurant in far Southern Indiana, a waiter said to me "Y'all want rah?". But then his thick Southern accent told me he wasn't from Indiana anyway. BTW, I finally figured out he was asking me if I wanted *rye* bread with my meal. )
This.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nearwest View Post
A term which I have heard used in Chicago is 'viaduct.' It refers to a railroad bridge or railroad overpass when the railroad crosses over city streets. I don't know if this use of the word in this context is present in other places.
Viaduct is used all over the UK, and definitely in New York and Pennsylvania, as well.
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Old 10-04-2018, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,150,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
So perhaps it's Ohio that's the odd man out calling it a cap? When you grow up in an area you assume everyone does things your way. I thought Montanans were weird for saying topper.

For the record, I used to point out to said Montanans that the truck part in question does in fact say cap (I don't remember where). Nowhere does it say topper. I wish I could find a pic.

In my defense, Leer is probably the most popular cap manufacturer and they call it a cap . (They throw in topper for the rest of you but they're all listed under the category TRUCK CAPS)

Truck Caps, Toppers, Camper Shells & Tonneau Covers by LEER | Fiberglass
I don’t know what those things on trucks are called, but around here “a topper” is what you ask the waiter for when you want your coffee or drink refilled/topped off.
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Old 10-04-2018, 03:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33053
Quote:
Originally Posted by cat1116 View Post
Oh, no. I picked that up too fairly recently. Trying to remember who I might know from Montana
Maybe I picked it up from someone that said it in a tv show or news/weather report even though we're no where near the state of Montana.

I still remember a company commander who would say/pronounce the word iron like ARN. I think she was from the western end of PA.
Yes, she probably was from way western PA.
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Old 10-04-2018, 07:36 PM
 
Location: South St Louis
3,794 posts, read 3,453,867 times
Reputation: 1957
St. Louisans have a distinct way of pronouncing some words. Prime examples are “fark” for fork, “farty” for forty, and “warsh” for wash.
In St. Louis, carbonated soft drinks are sodas. Pops is a night club.
“T-ravs” are a favorite local appetizer. (Ravioli deep fried and served with marinara sauce.)
The phrase “float trip” is frequently used in Missouri and Illinois..not sure if it’s restricted to this region though.
Someone previously mentioned “Hoosier” as a synonym for redneck. Well, sort of. In decades past, the term was often part of the phrase “South Side Hoosier”. This referred to a St Louisan, usually from the south side, who typically “astroturfed” their front porch; who might “Jerry-rig” things in their home to work without actually repairing them; who would barbecue pork steaks out on their front lawn; and who would enjoy a game of “warshers” and some “Buds”.
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Old 10-04-2018, 08:43 PM
 
5,858 posts, read 14,044,713 times
Reputation: 3482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Interesting! Another similar mispronunciation is "col-yum" for column. Probably another non-dilaectical gaffe.

One that drives me nuts that I know is not regional dialect is "eck-cetra" for etcetera (etc.). I hear that in many areas of the country. Also, didn't = "d'int", wouldn't = "wou'nt" and the like. I hear this even on the media among well-educated professional broadcasters.
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