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Old 05-06-2017, 11:42 PM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 600,751 times
Reputation: 1867

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmelo Sanantonio View Post
"Po'boy" for a type of sandwich - New Orleans
"Trainers" are sneakers/tennis shoes in Washington State, IIRC, compared to "sneakers" in the Northeast
Intrusive r's belong in New York and eastern New England
Strange, Canadian-like pronunciations of words like "about" and "house" can be found in Maryland and Virginia
In parts of the Upper Midwest, "kitty-corner" is used instead of "catercorner"
In Baltimore, people have a way of changing making certain "o" sounds to be closer to a short "u" in words like job, blog, dog, frog
Around Hampton Roads I've heard people use the word "wellin' " to say someone is lying

I immediately know someone is from Baltimore when they pronounce their words that way. Also, "dew" instead of "do" or "tew" instead of "two". Linguists refer to that as u-fronting. It's only 38 miles from DC, and their accent is so distinctively different from here.
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Old 05-07-2017, 03:04 AM
 
12,050 posts, read 11,142,366 times
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I've never heard someone from outside of New England use "wicked" as a superlative adjective.
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Old 05-07-2017, 03:05 AM
 
12,050 posts, read 11,142,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dapper23 View Post
And "hella" found its way up to Seattle
It migrated down to Southern California too -- back in the early 90s.
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Old 05-07-2017, 07:05 AM
 
Location: L'Enfant D.C. near the southern end of the megalopolis
39 posts, read 22,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuit_head View Post
I immediately know someone is from Baltimore when they pronounce their words that way. Also, "dew" instead of "do" or "tew" instead of "two". Linguists refer to that as u-fronting. It's only 38 miles from DC, and their accent is so distinctively different from here.
And it's pretty easy to pick out someone with a noticeable DC accent. Like if they say, "that's very true," the way that DC pronounces "very" is the same as in Baltimore, but "true" is not - the "u" sound is more normal, I guess. What's interesting is that some Baltimoreans don't seem to be able to notice the fronted "u."

Yes, and the distance is only 34 miles as the crow flies. Both accents are quite unique, but I consider them to be the closest cousins to each other. Recently, I've been comparing other places because I was wondering how these accents came to be.

Some other words:
"Jawn" - any noun in Philly
"The devil is beating his wife" - used to say that it is raining while the sun is out. I've heard this in the Mid-Atlantic and especially in points south of it. I remember that one from the NYT dialect quiz from a while back. I had to omit it so it wouldn't mark me as being from the deep south!
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Old 05-07-2017, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,654 posts, read 36,118,702 times
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"The devil is beating his wife" - LOL, I used that phrase just the other day! I use it every single time I see it raining while the sun is out!

Interesting linguistics map:

https://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics...maps/q_80.html

I was born in New Orleans but grew up mostly in Virginia and NC and Georgia.
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Old 05-09-2017, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,004 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Carriage for shopping cart
Rotary for traffic circle
Cellar and Basememt are synonyms
Bull**** as an emotion (he was bull****)
Statie for state police.
My mother is 88. Lived in NJ all her life. She says "carriage" for shopping cart, and so do I. My friend who was born in the Bronx calls it a wagon.

We always said cellar for the basement. I remember being a kid and realizing that other people called it a basement instead of a cellar. They were probably "newer" people to the area.
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Old 05-09-2017, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,004 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
NYC Area:
Standing on line instead of in line.
A fast food or deli cashier will ask "stay or to go?" Instead of "for here or to go
?"
Haha, yes. Northern NJ says those things, too. I have a friend who has lived in the DC area for more than 30 years now, and she still gets called down there on saying she's standing on line. I have to consciously make an effort to say "in line". It just doesn't sound right.

And yes, it's "to stay".

Something else that a friend who is originally from somewhere else noticed that I say is that someone is pregnant for their child. For example, when I was pregnant for my daughter, I had a lot of heartburn. She says "pregnant with". My mom had seven kids, and she was pregnant "for" all of them!
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Old 05-09-2017, 09:18 AM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,532,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
My mother is 88. Lived in NJ all her life. She says "carriage" for shopping cart, and so do I. My friend who was born in the Bronx calls it a wagon.

We always said cellar for the basement. I remember being a kid and realizing that other people called it a basement instead of a cellar. They were probably "newer" people to the area.
That's funny because when I went to college people from the Tri-state would make fun of me when I called a grocery cart a carriage so I assumed it was a New England thing.
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Old 05-09-2017, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,004 posts, read 54,508,374 times
Reputation: 66349
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
That's funny because when I went to college people from the Tri-state would make fun of me when I called a grocery cart a carriage so I assumed it was a New England thing.
I had a New York-born friend who made fun of me for calling it a carriage. She called it a cart. She also thought it was funny that I said "bottle of milk" rather than "container of milk".

What I think it might be is an earlier-American thing. Words like "cellar", "carriage" "supper" seem more common in people whose families were in the US longer as opposed to those who have only been in the US for two or three generations, and that might be even more narrowed down to people whose families were in the northeastern US. I'm not sure.
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Old 05-09-2017, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,227 posts, read 1,416,145 times
Reputation: 1666
Some more classic Bostonisms here... (spelled in spoken form)

Boston to English Dictionary (Boston Slang)

I had forgotten some good ones:

Bulkie for a dinner roll
Cupboard for a kitchen cabinet (pronounced kubbid)
Gravy for red sauce (like for spaghetti)
Skeevy for disgusting (I always thought that was a national term)
Agita for stress/worry (Ditto)
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