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Old 03-18-2010, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,515 posts, read 7,459,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lacyrocks192000 View Post
I was born and raised in rural southern Missouri, and most my kin live in rural Georgia and we visit alot there are some differences like the hospitality and people down south have better manners, and are bolder, but we eat the same things, have a pretty close accent and are all god fearin people. As far as bein Yankees, thats insulting.

We dont even use the word Yankee to describe ourselves in the midwestern states. I live in Michigan, which is really more Upper Midwest and I have never heard anyone use the word yankee to describe ourselves. People in the Northeast however are proud of being "yankees". People down south do call us yankees and lump everyone north of mason dixon in together as if we are all the same. Trust me, someone from Mich, or Wisc is WAY different from someone in the northeast. THe north is really two different places, one being the yankee northeast (anything east of Ohio), where all the stereotypes about the north come from. The northeast is busy, crowded, and the people tend to be less open and friendly. The other north is the midwest, rural and more open, nicer people. The midwest is so much different from the northeast that people from places like NY or NJ have a hard time adapting to the lifestyle here. I know 3 people who have moved here from the northeast and all of them lasted less than a year. The culture shock was too much for them and they all went home. Even the friendliness of the people seems odd and invasive to them. In all reality it is much easier for someone from the south to move here and fit in than it is for an easterner to do so.
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Old 03-18-2010, 09:28 PM
 
Location: USA
4,797 posts, read 4,237,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
We dont even use the word Yankee to describe ourselves in the midwestern states. I live in Michigan, which is really more Upper Midwest and I have never heard anyone use the word yankee to describe ourselves. People in the Northeast however are proud of being "yankees". People down south do call us yankees and lump everyone north of mason dixon in together as if we are all the same. Trust me, someone from Mich, or Wisc is WAY different from someone in the northeast. THe north is really two different places, one being the yankee northeast (anything east of Ohio), where all the stereotypes about the north come from. The northeast is busy, crowded, and the people tend to be less open and friendly. The other north is the midwest, rural and more open, nicer people. The midwest is so much different from the northeast that people from places like NY or NJ have a hard time adapting to the lifestyle here. I know 3 people who have moved here from the northeast and all of them lasted less than a year. The culture shock was too much for them and they all went home. Even the friendliness of the people seems odd and invasive to them. In all reality it is much easier for someone from the south to move here and fit in than it is for an easterner to do so.
I think you're exaggerating. Moving from a NE city to a MW city wouldn't be a culture shock at all. Moving from a NE small town to a MW small town may be a culture shock. I'm under the impression that small towns in the NE are pretty liberal. That's not the case at all in the MW, at least in every single town in Illinois outside of Chicago that I've ever visited.
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Old 03-18-2010, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,515 posts, read 7,459,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by It'sAutomatic View Post
I think you're exaggerating. Moving from a NE city to a MW city wouldn't be a culture shock at all. Moving from a NE small town to a MW small town may be a culture shock. I'm under the impression that small towns in the NE are pretty liberal. That's not the case at all in the MW, at least in every single town in Illinois outside of Chicago that I've ever visited.

I think even the cities of the midwest would be considered backward and provincal by urbanites from the northeast. Cities like Detroit, Milwalkee or Indianapolis would be considered small, dull and lacking sophistication in the eyes of someone used to NYC or Boston. Only Chicago comes close to what the northeasterner would be looking for in a city. I worked with a guy who transfered out here from NYC, to a VERY rural part of central Michigan. He melted down very quickly. He never got used to strangers talking to him, the open space, and he claimed he could not find his way home because all the roads looked the same going through the cornfields. lol He never understood why stores and restauraunts closed at 8pm. The funniest thing that happened was the way he absoultely freaked out when the thunderstorms came in. He literly looked like a frightened dog hiding under the bed through a storm. I guess the storms out east are much milder lol. HE was a nice guy, but he just could not adjust to it. He was gone in ONE MONTH. Having visited the east myself many times, I understand why he could not adjust. They are used to people, lots of them. They are busy and fast paced and only talk to strangers if they have business with them. They do not travel far from home, some hardly ever leave thier own city. There is always something to do, things are always open. There is not much open space, concrete and buildings are what you see. Even outside the cities, developements are everywhere, stripmalls and subdivisions. They live so very different from us, I believe it is a HUGE culture shock.
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Old 03-19-2010, 06:22 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,155,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Having visited the east myself many times, I understand why he could not adjust. They are used to people, lots of them. They are busy and fast paced and only talk to strangers if they have business with them. They do not travel far from home, some hardly ever leave thier own city. There is always something to do, things are always open. There is not much open space, concrete and buildings are what you see. Even outside the cities, developements are everywhere, stripmalls and subdivisions. They live so very different from us, I believe it is a HUGE culture shock.
Having lived in the Northeast for 20 years after growing up in small town Michigan (Scottville, McBain, the Soo, Sparr), and being back home in Michigan now, I have to set a few things straight here. Not all of the Northeast is large cities; hustle and bustle. Actually there is a small strip of the Northeast that would fall into that category. Most of the Northeast is small towns, laid-back people, and a lifestyle that is very similar to the Midwest. Get away from the Boston to NYC strip and other than terrain and accents, you would be hard pressed to find much difference at all. I can tell you that there is more open spaces and less people in parts of New England and the Northeast than there is even in the UP of Michigan. Look to Maine. Huge forested areas that make the UP pale when it comes to remoteness, and lack of population. I moved from the Gaylord area (Sparr to be exact) to Northern Maine and hated it, in part, because it was so slow paced. My wife was born and raised less than 50 miles from Boston in a small town where you cannot go to the store without talking about the weather, what brings you to town, etc.... That was all without her with me, just out while she visited with friends for a day. MOST of the Northeast is just like the Midwest.

Now City to City there wouldn't be a huge difference, and small town to small town there isn't much difference. City to rural anyplace most people have a problem adjusting. The Northeast does have higher population density in their larger cities than we do in the Midwest generally, and there is better public transportation in most of them. It is just expected that you can take the train or subway most places to want to go in Northeastern cities, not so true for most Midwest cities.
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Old 03-19-2010, 11:39 AM
 
7,594 posts, read 9,448,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Having lived in the Northeast for 20 years after growing up in small town Michigan (Scottville, McBain, the Soo, Sparr), and being back home in Michigan now, I have to set a few things straight here. Not all of the Northeast is large cities; hustle and bustle. Actually there is a small strip of the Northeast that would fall into that category. Most of the Northeast is small towns, laid-back people, and a lifestyle that is very similar to the Midwest. Get away from the Boston to NYC strip and other than terrain and accents, you would be hard pressed to find much difference at all. I can tell you that there is more open spaces and less people in parts of New England and the Northeast than there is even in the UP of Michigan. Look to Maine. Huge forested areas that make the UP pale when it comes to remoteness, and lack of population. I moved from the Gaylord area (Sparr to be exact) to Northern Maine and hated it, in part, because it was so slow paced. My wife was born and raised less than 50 miles from Boston in a small town where you cannot go to the store without talking about the weather, what brings you to town, etc.... That was all without her with me, just out while she visited with friends for a day. MOST of the Northeast is just like the Midwest.

Now City to City there wouldn't be a huge difference, and small town to small town there isn't much difference. City to rural anyplace most people have a problem adjusting. The Northeast does have higher population density in their larger cities than we do in the Midwest generally, and there is better public transportation in most of them. It is just expected that you can take the train or subway most places to want to go in Northeastern cities, not so true for most Midwest cities.
I'm glad that you set the record straight; many parts of New England are fairly similar to cities and towns in WI and MN; Burlington, VT is similar to Madison, etc. Northern NE states are, with the exceptions of mountain ranges, similar to the landscapes in staes such as MI, WI, and MN ( heavily forested, lakes, dairy farms, etc); someone moving from Boston or NYC to Chicago will not experience any personal trauma...
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:56 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,829 posts, read 21,138,014 times
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Seems like the rural Midwest has much more of a farming culture than the rural South. Most small towns I've been to in the Carolinas are still quite urban and have lots of factories. I was surprised how few pickup trucks there I saw compared to Kentucky (were 90% of people drive one). In most of the rural Midwest the only jobs in rural areas are in farming or retail while in the South most rural residents work at textile factories or logging related industries with very few people making money from the land they own.
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Old 03-19-2010, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,515 posts, read 7,459,650 times
Reputation: 10918
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Seems like the rural Midwest has much more of a farming culture than the rural South. Most small towns I've been to in the Carolinas are still quite urban and have lots of factories. I was surprised how few pickup trucks there I saw compared to Kentucky (were 90% of people drive one). In most of the rural Midwest the only jobs in rural areas are in farming or retail while in the South most rural residents work at textile factories or logging related industries with very few people making money from the land they own.
Everytime im in the south I notice how much less agriculture there is than where I live. There is however lots of woods. I was driving acrost Mississippi and did not see even one cotton field. That state looks as if it produces alot more lumber than cotton these days.
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Old 03-20-2010, 01:14 AM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,507 posts, read 7,312,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Seems like the rural Midwest has much more of a farming culture than the rural South. Most small towns I've been to in the Carolinas are still quite urban and have lots of factories. I was surprised how few pickup trucks there I saw compared to Kentucky (were 90% of people drive one). In most of the rural Midwest the only jobs in rural areas are in farming or retail while in the South most rural residents work at textile factories or logging related industries with very few people making money from the land they own.

Kentucky is a southern state.
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Old 03-20-2010, 02:21 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,326,275 times
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Well, driving along the interstates, you're not likely to run across farms and such in the South, or at least my part of the South (Carolinas). Get along some of the back roads or major highways and you're bound to see lots of farmland.
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Old 03-20-2010, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,515 posts, read 7,459,650 times
Reputation: 10918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Well, driving along the interstates, you're not likely to run across farms and such in the South, or at least my part of the South (Carolinas). Get along some of the back roads or major highways and you're bound to see lots of farmland.
IVe spent lots of time on the backroads, and your right I do see some farmland in some places. If you compare it to Michigan or any other midwest state however you will notice a difference. Almost everything is cultivated here. (unless your in the northern half of the state). I see lots of wooded areas, southern pine in the Carolinas, with some agriculture mixed in.
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