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Old 03-20-2010, 12:08 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,331,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
IVe spent lots of time on the backroads, and your right I do see some farmland in some places. If you compare it to Michigan or any other midwest state however you will notice a difference. Almost everything is cultivated here. (unless your in the northern half of the state). I see lots of wooded areas, southern pine in the Carolinas, with some agriculture mixed in.
Yeah we do have a lot of wooded areas also. I remember driving through Ohio on the way to Detroit from down here. The open land for farming I saw driving through Ohio was nothing like what you'd see down here. There was a stretch in particular where the farmland seemed to stretch on forever.
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Old 03-20-2010, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,465,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Yeah we do have a lot of wooded areas also. I remember driving through Ohio on the way to Detroit from down here. The open land for farming I saw driving through Ohio was nothing like what you'd see down here. There was a stretch in particular where the farmland seemed to stretch on forever.
That stretch of I-75 is really boring, even up here in Michigan we dont like having to driving it. Unfortunately if your going down south, esp if your going to the Carolinas you have to go that way. We have a few dull roads in Mi, but that stretch of 75 in Ohio is mind numbing. I think all sterotypes of the boring midwest are confirmed in travelers minds as they drive through that part of western Ohio. In all fairness to Ohio, it is not as bad if you get off that ribbon of concrete. Lots of farms for sure, but they have some really nice small towns in western Ohio.
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Old 03-21-2010, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,954,392 times
Reputation: 2129
You will not see in Kentucky Censusdata anything like you see in Indiana or Illinios... miles and miles and miles of nothing but farmland. The drive to St Louis through Illinios was awful... city when you get in and city when you get out and nothing in between. Indiana and tons and tons of corn even in towns. We do have alot of forest here in kentucky too. Census are you sure you have been to many places here in your home state of Kentucky?
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Old 03-29-2010, 10:52 PM
 
Location: South South Jersey
1,652 posts, read 3,409,845 times
Reputation: 734
In other news, the Midwest is one big farm, the "East Coast" is one big city, and the West Coast is one big beach. (Oh, and also - don't confuse me by insisting that those are at best fuzzy/ill-defined, by necessity overlapping [in many cases], and terribly unofficial labels, or remind me that rural vs. urban is often a way more significant distinction than any region vs. region one - you will do nothing but confuse me, I'm afraid. )

City-Data: thousands of people who know absolutely nothing about geography typing hundreds of thousands of posts about it (often - and incredibly - arrogantly, too, I might add).

There are so many things wrong with so many of the posts in this thread that I don't even know where to begin picking apart their millions of ridiculous claims.

Thank you, that is all.
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Old 04-01-2010, 07:20 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,868,107 times
Reputation: 1668
Alicia -

No kidding. Being from the Midwest, but from a large urban area, and having family from the northeast, in a rural area, I'm utterly perplexed by the geographic ignorance so gleefully splayed across these boards. I also completely agree with you that the urban/rural divide in the US is the largest US cultural divide I've encountered in my travels around the country.
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Old 04-01-2010, 07:37 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,987,604 times
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I've lived in Michigan and in Tennessee. I found TN friendlier and more outgoing. The big difference is religion. Most people I met in TN assumed everyone was christian and went to church and seemed to think other people's religious beliefs/non-beliefs was their business.
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:04 PM
 
871 posts, read 1,957,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missymomof3 View Post
You will not see in Kentucky Censusdata anything like you see in Indiana or Illinios... miles and miles and miles of nothing but farmland. The drive to St Louis through Illinios was awful... city when you get in and city when you get out and nothing in between. Indiana and tons and tons of corn even in towns. We do have alot of forest here in kentucky too. Census are you sure you have been to many places here in your home state of Kentucky?
lets settle this with a map from the forest service

pretty much all southern states are mostly covered in forest. as for the central midwest, not. also, the mississippi delta region of the south is extremeley flat and is almost all farmland.

but yes, kentucky has quite a bit of forest land. indiana does not. probably has to do with how flat indiana is

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Old 04-02-2010, 02:12 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,208,158 times
Reputation: 2078
Quote:
Originally Posted by missymomof3 View Post
You will not see in Kentucky Censusdata anything like you see in Indiana or Illinios... miles and miles and miles of nothing but farmland.
A great deal of the land in these states is forest. You've got the Great Lakes region confused with the Great Plains.
Quote:
Indiana and tons and tons of corn even in towns.
Right. Hell, we even grow it in our yards, parks, on top of buildings--everywhere we can!
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:15 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,208,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyJohnWilson View Post
but yes, kentucky has quite a bit of forest land. indiana does not. probably has to do with how flat indiana is
Uh, no. Pretty much all of Indiana was deciduous forest before White settlement. Upon discovering how productive the soils were, the settlers cleared them en masse.
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:18 PM
 
871 posts, read 1,957,625 times
Reputation: 596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
Uh, no. Pretty much all of Indiana was deciduous forest before White settlement. Upon discovering how productive the soils were, the settlers cleared them en masse.
my point exactly. flat land=great for farming. as a result, cut down all the trees for farming.
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