U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-08-2017, 07:38 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,096 posts, read 35,044,432 times
Reputation: 15281

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward234 View Post
Old Ballard definitely has a downtown-y feel to it and it's within Seattle city limits.
Interesting that Ballard was very much its' own city and actually larger in population than Seattle when it was annexed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-08-2017, 10:19 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,386,421 times
Reputation: 18522
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Same here. Sometimes I see people using the metro populations to describe how big a city is, but it's really the city proper populations that matter.
It depends on the context. Personally, I find metro areas/urbanized areas to be much more relevant metrics since they use a consistent criteria across all places whereas municipal boundaries are quite arbitrary. But I do understand how municipal population makes sense for cities like NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2017, 10:25 AM
 
31 posts, read 18,759 times
Reputation: 28
Atlantam then Buckhead it seems to me
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2017, 10:29 AM
 
31 posts, read 18,759 times
Reputation: 28
DT Memphis (e.g. Main, Union, Riverside, Madison, etc), and East Memphis (Perkins, including Clark Tower Area all the way on Poplar maybe to edge of Germantown/International Paper plaza)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2017, 11:32 AM
 
308 posts, read 186,846 times
Reputation: 279
In threads like these I think it's better to look at the whole metro area instead of just the main city proper. The land area sizes of the major city propers around the U.S. are considerately different. When you look at the metropolitan area you can see what other downtown areas are close by no matter what the main city proper land area size is.

Last edited by pinytr; 05-08-2017 at 11:36 AM.. Reason: .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2017, 11:52 AM
 
7,707 posts, read 4,569,470 times
Reputation: 8423
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinytr View Post
In threads like these I think it's better to look at the whole metro area instead of just the main city proper. The land area sizes of the major city propers around the U.S. are considerately different. When you look at the metropolitan area you can see what other downtown areas are close by no matter what the main city proper land area size is.
Actually, threads like this are when city limits are MOST important. Literally no one is surprised or impressed then a multi-nodal metro had multiple downtowns.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2017, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,427 posts, read 11,929,235 times
Reputation: 10539
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinytr View Post
In threads like these I think it's better to look at the whole metro area instead of just the main city proper. The land area sizes of the major city propers around the U.S. are considerately different. When you look at the metropolitan area you can see what other downtown areas are close by no matter what the main city proper land area size is.
The thing is, provided the multiple cities are actually historic cities that grew together, and not jumped up suburbs (like Arlington, VA or Bellvue, WA) of course they will each have a downtown, because every city built out before 1900 (and most built out before say 1930) are going to have their own downtown commercial area.

Having two "downtowns" inside one city is more unique though, because it suggests at some point the powers that be decided that the first downtown didn't have enough capacity, and they needed to get a second one rolling.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2017, 12:05 PM
 
56,637 posts, read 80,930,134 times
Reputation: 12509
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The thing is, provided the multiple cities are actually historic cities that grew together, and not jumped up suburbs (like Arlington, VA or Bellvue, WA) of course they will each have a downtown, because every city built out before 1900 (and most built out before say 1930) are going to have their own downtown commercial area.

Having two "downtowns" inside one city is more unique though, because it suggests at some point the powers that be decided that the first downtown didn't have enough capacity, and they needed to get a second one rolling.
Or it may have been a previously independent community that was later annexed into a city.

There may also be the case of another part of the city having a substantial concentration of people via an institution or institutions like colleges(i.e.-Oakland in Pittsburgh, University Hill in Syracuse, Collegetown in Ithaca, etc.).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2017, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,729 posts, read 7,686,254 times
Reputation: 7650
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalentedDrinker View Post
University City, Philadelphia.

Cambridge for Boston, if it were actually part of Boston technically.

I tend to think of places as metros or urban areas, not cities, because that is kind of meticulous.
Cambridge is an entire city over 100k people. And a lot of it is really quiet and suburban. I don't think the central parts of Cambridge come anything close to a "downtown" vibe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2017, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,427 posts, read 11,929,235 times
Reputation: 10539
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
There may also be the case of another part of the city having a substantial concentration of people via an institution or institutions like colleges(i.e.-Oakland in Pittsburgh, University Hill in Syracuse, Collegetown in Ithaca, etc.).
Oakland was actually purpose-built to be a "second downtown" for Pittsburgh around 1900. The civic leaders at the time didn't like how grimy downtown had gotten, and decided to build up Oakland as a new "civic center" with the museums and cultural venues of the city. During the same time period the Carnegie Institute (a forerunner of CMU) was founded (1900) and University of Pittsburgh moved from Downtown (1909), but these were only bit parts in the original plan, which was much more ambitious. Later, as college enrollment ballooned, of course their prominence helped the neighborhood become more built out, but that was an affect of those early decisions, not the cause.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top