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Old 05-08-2017, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Florida and New England
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Kansas City has its historic Downtown and five miles to the South, the Plaza -- both areas have significant workforces and are separated by several neighborhoods.
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Old 05-08-2017, 12:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Oakland was actually purpose-built to be a "second downtown" for Pittsburgh around 1900. The civic leaders at the time didn't like how grimy downtown had gotten, and decided to build up Oakland as a new "civic center" with the museums and cultural venues of the city. During the same time period the Carnegie Institute (a forerunner of CMU) was founded (1900) and University of Pittsburgh moved from Downtown (1909), but these were only bit parts in the original plan, which was much more ambitious. Later, as college enrollment ballooned, of course their prominence helped the neighborhood become more built out, but that was an affect of those early decisions, not the cause.
So, what else was a part of the original plan?

It looks like Oakland was annexed into Pittsburgh around 1868.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 05-08-2017 at 12:49 PM..
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Old 05-08-2017, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
So, what else was a part of the original plan?
Basically an entirely new CBD. At that time, as I mentioned, Downtown as very dirty, and still had a lot of industrial activity. Oakland had really only one mill down by the river, but otherwise no industrial employers and a very "pastoral" setting. The thought was to move all of the white-collar activity into a new "City Beautiful" downtown in Oakland which would be a "showcase" district that the world would find impressive. The attempt to do this floundered by 1910, but the museums, main Carnegie library, and placement of the universities are a legacy of this era.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
It looks like Oakland was annexed into Pittsburgh around 1868.
Yeah, pretty much the entire East End was. Oakland was largely farmland at the time of annexation, and only began being built out into something urban around 1890 or so.
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Old 05-08-2017, 01:33 PM
 
1,787 posts, read 2,144,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuit_head View Post
Yeah, I'll um just say Buckhead to compromise...Midtown is still pretty distinctive enough from Downtown Atlanta. A better question would be which area has more employers and a larger daytime population, Buckhead or Midtown?

University City in San Diego.

New Center in Detroit was arguably one of the first ones of these "second" downtowns.
Correct, if you walk southward down 2nd Avenue toward New Center, it feels you are walking into a real BIG CITY downtown. See below:

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3713...8i6656!6m1!1e1

A lot of these "downtowns" being proposed are charming, dense, vibrant places. But, with the exception of Midtown & Buckhead Atlanta and downtown Brooklyn and Oakland, they mostly consist of 1- to 3-story buildings and don't look like a BIG CITY central business district like New Center does from certain vantage points.

Last edited by usroute10; 05-08-2017 at 01:47 PM..
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Old 05-08-2017, 02:01 PM
 
7,694 posts, read 4,551,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
Correct, if you walk southward down 2nd Avenue toward New Center, it feels you are walking into a real BIG CITY downtown. See below:

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3713...8i6656!6m1!1e1

A lot of these "downtowns" being proposed are charming, dense, vibrant places. But, with the exception of Midtown & Buckhead Atlanta and downtown Brooklyn and Oakland, they mostly consist of 1- to 3-story buildings and don't look like a BIG CITY central business district like New Center does from certain vantage points.
This is a great example, but I disagree with your assessment of Oakland:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4405...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4427...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 05-08-2017, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I considered Long Island city, but decided against it because it doesn't functionally represent "Downtown Queens", if that makes sense.
Imo Queens has multiple CBDs similar to how LA area is, but on a smaller scale, with LIC, downtown Jamaica, and downtown Flushing. They are downtowns, but they are not anchoring a whole borough, just part of the borough.


In broader context, the core that is anchoring the 20 million metro NYC is roughly the "skyscraper area" from Journal Square to the West, Long Island City to the East, 125th St. to the North, and Barclays Center to the South. I'd add the tip of Staten Island once the wheel is constructed too.

Last edited by Gantz; 05-08-2017 at 02:42 PM..
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Old 05-08-2017, 02:53 PM
 
7,694 posts, read 4,551,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Imo Queens has multiple CBDs similar to how LA area is, but on a smaller scale, with LIC, downtown Jamaica, and downtown Flushing. They are downtowns, but they are not anchoring a whole borough, just part of the borough.


In broader context, the core that is anchoring the 20 million metro NYC is roughly the "skyscraper area" from Journal Square to the West, Long Island City to the East, 125th St. to the North, and Barclays Center to the South. I'd add the tip of Staten Island once the wheel is constructed too.
I've always thought of Jamaica as downtown Queens. I've always thought of Jamaica as "downtown queens" . That's probably due to the presence of the courthouse.
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Old 05-08-2017, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I've always thought of Jamaica as downtown Queens. I've always thought of Jamaica as "downtown queens" . That's probably due to the presence of the courthouse.
It depends on the criteria.


Jamaica - government/administrative
LIC - skyscrapers, jobs
Flushing - busiest, most commercial
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Old 05-08-2017, 04:37 PM
 
37 posts, read 46,434 times
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LA has many multiple urban cores throughout the basin that only a real native can list/know them all. Burbank, Long Beach, Santa Monica, Century City, Koreatown, Riverside, Santa Ana, and even Glendale all have their skylines and walkable plazas.

Then there's the small town vibe downtowns that are untouched by new development such as Oldtown Pasadena, Claremont, San Juan Capistrano..
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Old 05-08-2017, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,110 posts, read 1,303,876 times
Reputation: 1825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Imo Queens has multiple CBDs similar to how LA area is, but on a smaller scale, with LIC, downtown Jamaica, and downtown Flushing. They are downtowns, but they are not anchoring a whole borough, just part of the borough.


In broader context, the core that is anchoring the 20 million metro NYC is roughly the "skyscraper area" from Journal Square to the West, Long Island City to the East, 125th St. to the North, and Barclays Center to the South. I'd add the tip of Staten Island once the wheel is constructed too.
Queens to me always felt like less unified than the other boroughs. For example Manhattan, Brooklyn, & The Bronx have more uniform similarities through all or most neighborhoods. But Queens has more variety throughout neighborhoods in layout, urban environment, housing stock, etc.

Maybe it has to do with the history of Queens how it was developed as a county made up of independent smaller towns/cities where Brooklyn grew/developed as one unified independent city, and Manhattan + The Bronx together as NYC.
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