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Old 05-07-2017, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,633 posts, read 2,781,093 times
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Sugar is what made so many people go XL in the last 25 years. One of the main drivers of our increased sugar consumption was/is drinks that are incredibly high in it. Soda is essentially liquid candy and some people became accustom to giving their children multiple cans a day.

It's a proven fact, at least in the city of Philadelphia, that there is an extreme correlation between soda consumption, poverty, and diabetes.

We took the extreme measure of slapping a consumption tax on.

Of course, the corporate powers that be have cried wolf the entire time. My gf and I get phone calls weekly from "surveyors" who have a clear objective to explain how "terrible" the tax is.

In reality, it has funded a new pre-k program for toddlers in the city and has cut consumption down by about 33%. 40 soda truck drivers lost their job, but 250 early care teachers and staff were hired for the program. So no, the world didn't end and the poor haven't died of thirst. And maybe the next generation will grow up to become a little healthier and a little more intelligent.

Last edited by thedirtypirate; 05-07-2017 at 05:46 AM..
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Old 05-07-2017, 05:29 AM
 
Location: City of North Las Vegas, NV
11,290 posts, read 7,876,170 times
Reputation: 3018
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
It's more expensive to eat healthy. There are other cultural reasons too.
yes, for sure I know
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Old 05-07-2017, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,400,744 times
Reputation: 2089
In Columbus there is a clear divide between the lower income predominately black neighborhoods and higher income Caucasian areas. Central, North and Northwest Columbus are much less obese than the east and northeast sides.
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Old 05-08-2017, 07:14 AM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,124,311 times
Reputation: 2152
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
Sugar is what made so many people go XL in the last 25 years. One of the main drivers of our increased sugar consumption was/is drinks that are incredibly high in it. Soda is essentially liquid candy and some people became accustom to giving their children multiple cans a day.

It's a proven fact, at least in the city of Philadelphia, that there is an extreme correlation between soda consumption, poverty, and diabetes.

We took the extreme measure of slapping a consumption tax on.

Of course, the corporate powers that be have cried wolf the entire time. My gf and I get phone calls weekly from "surveyors" who have a clear objective to explain how "terrible" the tax is.

In reality, it has funded a new pre-k program for toddlers in the city and has cut consumption down by about 33%. 40 soda truck drivers lost their job, but 250 early care teachers and staff were hired for the program. So no, the world didn't end and the poor haven't died of thirst. And maybe the next generation will grow up to become a little healthier and a little more intelligent.
Bingo. It's almost entirely the sugar industry over the last 40 years (the low-fat craze of the 70s was influenced by science paid for by the sugar industry). Read labels and see just how much sugar is in nearly all processed foods. It's insane.
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Old 05-08-2017, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,853 posts, read 2,978,355 times
Reputation: 3399
Looking at Austin, yep, poverty = fat. Doesn't look like Austin has a lot of fats though.
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Old 05-08-2017, 08:48 AM
 
2,774 posts, read 1,134,080 times
Reputation: 2649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Looking at Austin, yep, poverty = fat. Doesn't look like Austin has a lot of fats though.
I was actually surprised how much blue Austin had for being largely car-dependent sunbelt city. San Antonio is looking much worse.
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Old 05-08-2017, 08:58 AM
 
5,419 posts, read 2,819,339 times
Reputation: 10134
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
Bingo. It's almost entirely the sugar industry over the last 40 years (the low-fat craze of the 70s was influenced by science paid for by the sugar industry). Read labels and see just how much sugar is in nearly all processed foods. It's insane.
This is true. When fat was villainized, processed foods amped up their sugar content, allegedly to make up for the flavor. It doesn't work for me because sugar does NOT taste or feel like fat!!!!! But apparently the majority just took it without noticing the upcreep in sugar content.

I switched products to avoid it. But consumers were duped by little tricks, such as separating "sugar" from other sweeteners, namely and notoriously high-fructose corn syrup. By separating different forms of sugar on the ingredient lists, a casual reader might not notice anything besides seeing "sugar" far down the list...while two or three other forms of sweeteners were near the top. If the weights of all forms of it were added together, the sugars would be Number One ingredient.

Sugar was CHEAP when I grew up. I don't think the scapegoating of fat was coincidental.

Similarly, the reason why cheese is built into so many food products today is that, after fat became the bad guy and low-fat or skim milk was glorified while butter was declared dangerous, dairy processors had too much fat leftover. So they made more cheese products, which became ever more intrusive. In some restaurants, there is no menu item for hamburger. To get a plain hamburger, you must order a cheeseburger and tell them No Cheese, which of course you still pay for. Want a sandwich made without cheese as a default ingredient? Forget about most premade sandwiches, and make sure you tell a make-to-order preparer No Cheese.
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Old 05-08-2017, 09:25 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,974 posts, read 3,453,869 times
Reputation: 2445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Oh DC metro.. Notably PG County.
Quit playing dude, you know where the phatty's live out here .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Look how the Potomac creates such a distinction between the VA side and MD side around Alexandria/PG. Woah!

It's actually the Anacostia and Eastward where the distinction lies.
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Old 05-08-2017, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,853 posts, read 2,978,355 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewjdeg View Post
I was actually surprised how much blue Austin had for being largely car-dependent sunbelt city. San Antonio is looking much worse.
Yeah, not sure how accurate they are, but Austin is usually ranked pretty high in those fittest US city polls.


SA has unbelievable Mexican food.
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Old 05-08-2017, 10:01 AM
 
2,507 posts, read 2,268,209 times
Reputation: 1829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewjdeg View Post
I was actually surprised how much blue Austin had for being largely car-dependent sunbelt city. San Antonio is looking much worse.
It's the influx of the type of people Austin has been attracting over the years.
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