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Old 05-18-2017, 10:14 AM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
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Isn't New York itself one of Boston's "weekend getaway" locations and vice versa?
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Old 05-18-2017, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,310,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
Isn't New York itself one of Boston's "weekend getaway" locations and vice versa?
Yeah and on top of that they share many other "weekend getaway" destinations.
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Old 05-18-2017, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,860 posts, read 7,806,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
Isn't New York itself one of Boston's "weekend getaway" locations and vice versa?
Maybe for some. I tend to keep my weekend getaways to 2-1/2 hours or less.
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Old 05-18-2017, 11:18 AM
 
1,229 posts, read 975,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post
I spend many summer weekends in Maine and you are greatly exaggerating the traffic. On a Friday afternoon it's bad in the Boston area, which is not surprising. After that, it is generally clear sailing all the way up. It also gets annoying coming home from roughly York to the Piscataqua Bridge (5-8 miles of stop and go) and even then it only adds another half hour onto drive time. I have never experienced "dead stop".

Btw, Boston to Kittery is about an hour and 15 to an hour and a half depending on traffic.
It depends on the time you travel. There's been nights in the summer my neighbor didn't arrive home until almost 8 commuting from Wakefield. The 128 does cause some of it though.

It gets bad up to the river and gets bad up to the NH toll booth too. There can be a break in between the two but it can still get backed up for miles at both.

But it's really not that pleasant in general in coastal southern Maine in the summer. The traffic gets to be stop and go in the towns, on the beaches, on Route 1. It's overcrowded and not properly designed imo (no middle lane near the Kittery Outlets for example causing lane stoppages). And the traffic often gets backed up from the Outlets and well into York. The NH seacoast gets bad too.

It's not much of an "escape." It feels like you're living in suburban Boston during the summer.

Last edited by joeyg2014; 05-18-2017 at 11:39 AM..
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Old 05-18-2017, 11:29 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,911,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post
The timber companies like Plum Creek and Weyerhaeuser allow full public access to their lands. I camp, fish, and jeep up there and have never seen a "no trespassing" sign in the backwoods.
Yes, but are their lands in Maine the size the of Indiana? Do you see the point?

On a off topic but serious note, we cannot take private lands being accessible for granted much longer. American corporations have increasingly been thinking short term profits versus long term growth (one of the reasons the US has been falling behind economically) and it would only take a change of corporate leadership or a buyout for a timber company to cut their forests or to sell it outright. I also have read that foreign companies have been looking as our timber lands as "undeveloped".

https://www.nwf.org/Wildlife/Wild-Pl...rn-Forest.aspx

The Northern Forest is under threat due to increasing pressure from development in the areas closest to large population centers like Boston and Portland and along the Connecticut River.
Throughout most of the 1900's,*much of the land in the Northern Forest region was owned by timber companies.**Although the timber companies were not always the best stewards of the land, they did maintain their property in a forested manner that continued to provide wildlife habitat and ecosystem services.*
In the mid-1990's, the region began to change as the large timber companies sold their rights to forest lands they had owned for decades.* They fragmented larger parcels and sold them off piece by piece to private owners.* Each landowner makes separate decisions about the management of their land, sometimes without thinking about the larger needs of the surrounding forest habitat.* More than 80 percent of the Northern Forest is now privately owned, and may not have legal protection.
While much of the Northern Forest remains intact, increasing pressure for the money that development brings, along with increasing demand for housing in areas with growing populations, encourages private owners to sell, subdivide or develop their land.
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Old 05-18-2017, 11:37 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,911,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
It depends on the time you travel. There's been nights in the summer my neighbor didn't arrive home until almost 8 commuting from Wakefield. The 128 does cause some of it though.

It gets bad up to the river and gets bad up to the NH toll booth too. There can be a break in between the two but it can still get backed up for miles at both.

But it's really not that pleasant in general in coastal southern Maine in the summer. The traffic gets to be stop and go in the towns, on the beaches, on Route 1. It's overcrowded and not properly designed imo (no middle lane near the Kittery Outlets for example causing lane stoppages). The NH seacoast gets bad too. And now the Route 1 bridge connecting ME and NH is closed, which will probably cause extra problems this summer.

It's not much of an "escape." It feels like you're living in suburban Boston during the summer.
Yes, this is right, timing is key. If that means you cannot leave for your lake house on Friday at rush hour and instead you leave a few hours later, say at 8pm so be it. It can make a huge difference.

However, unfortunately it is harder to time coming home on Sunday!

Anyway from central Long Island I have been to Boston in about 4 hours and that includes a quick stop for lunch. I have also been to Saratoga Springs in 4 hours, beating the other two cars I was with by a considerable amount of time (I did not take the Tappan Zee Bridge). We wanted to get ahead of everyone else so we could open up the house.

Having said that, my last trip to Virginia was a disaster because of the traffic around DC. I imagine going from Boston to Virginia would even be worse because they to travel through NYC AND DC!
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Old 05-18-2017, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,391,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
All good points. For me, 7 hours of driving gets out of "weekend" territory, but I know that's not a deal breaker for some. My threshold is about 4-5 hours or so (preferably 3) - about a tank of gas. At that rate, I can can sneak out of work an hour or two early on Friday and be at my destination in time for dinner (or relatively early drinks). 7 hours (again, for me) means multiple stops (gas/bathroom/food) and probably not arriving until midnight or later on a Friday. When you're talking two nights away, arriving at midnight after a long drive is just not worth it anymore for my old self. But for others (and even myself as recently as 5 or so years ago), it's doable.

Philadelphia is definitely closer to Toronto. But when I go to Toronto (my girlfriend has family there), there's no way I'm driving regardless. I always fly. Porter Airlines makes it a no-brainer from Boston. I jump on the Blue Line and am going through security 1/2 hour later. The flight is just over an hour, and I land at Billy Bishop (Not Pearson) and literally walk from the airport to downtown Toronto. There are few better downtown to downtown air connections in the world. And Porter is usually pretty cheap. I give you credit for taking the bus. I take Megabus (or one of the others) to NYC sometimes, but I really don't like it. I couldn't do it for that type of distance (though I know people who take it to DC from Boston).

You're right about the Jersey Shore. There's much better access to the ocean. No contest. I'd add that for anyone looking for a more than just quiet beach time, the Jersey Shore offers more as well. Each region is different, and each is appealing for different reasons.
Yeah, it was an experience haha, probably wouldn't do it again. It was about a 10 hour trip with 1.5-2 hours of that at the border. The price of MegaBus of course was unbeatable though.
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Old 05-18-2017, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,048 posts, read 23,942,176 times
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Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
I'm not saying that people elsewhere do not have places up in mountains, on Rivers/lakes but from my experience people from particularly Eastern New England tend to have a stronger "cottage culture" while people from other parts of the country tend to go on vacation to a variety of places.
I would say the Northeast, though I've known people in North Carolina who did that. There's got to be people in the upper Midwest who did or do that. There's a lot of water up there.
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Old 05-18-2017, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,310,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Yeah, it was an experience haha, probably wouldn't do it again. It was about a 10 hour trip with 1.5-2 hours of that at the border. The price of MegaBus of course was unbeatable though.
lol I took the Megabus from NYC to Toronto before too. ^^^^^ this is exactly what I said about the experience almost word-for-word
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Old 05-18-2017, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,048 posts, read 23,942,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post
Boston is as close to the Adirondacks as NYC is.

I think Boston wins because of its proximity to Maine. People who haven't been there don't realize how incredible Maine is.
I don't think either one wins or loses. They're both beautiful areas with an endless number of things to visit, see, do. You can get lost in the woods, swim in the ocean, visit quaint small towns and world class museums. How can any of that be wrong?
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