U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-17-2017, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,061 posts, read 16,104,972 times
Reputation: 9402

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TalentedDrinker View Post
If suburban Philadelphia is dull, I don't wanna know what 95% of the other city suburbs in America are. The PA countryside is extremely lush, with rolling hills and historic with loads of charm. Oldest suburbs in the nation along with New York and Boston.

If that's dull, I don't wanna know what you think of Denver, Dallas or Phoenix suburbs. Woof.

Sorry I'll also take Mid-Atlantic beach options over New England. The climate alone is enough to do so.

Philadelphia is closer to New York and Washington. The only thing in my opinion Boston may have an edge is mountains, but when Philadelphia is 2-4 hours to the Adirondacks, Catskills, Poconos, and the Appalachians (countless PA state forests and Washington/Jefferson National Forest), its more options. Philadelphia has something within 2-4 hours of any direction. Boston does not.

They both can use the Catskills and Adirondacks.

Boston does have a subregion mostly to itself, but with that comes isolation and limited options. The immediate Philadelphia metro area has more rolling hills than immediate metro Boston does. Negligible probably, but it's there.

So yes, Philadelphia indeed.
I love suburban Philadelphia. But the constant droning on about the "rolling hills" equals rolling eyes over here. Suburban Philadelphia is gorgeous. And apart from some of Boston's more charming seaside communities, I'd definitely argue that suburban Philadelphia has more suburbs that are destinations in their own right. Boston has beautiful, charming, leafy suburbs among the rolling hills, but they're far more residential. You also can't argue with the fact that Philadelphia has much better access to the major Bos-Wash cities (DC, NYC, etc.).

All that being said, I think Boston offers a much more well-rounded variety of "weekend getaways" than Philadelphia. For all of the charm of the rolling hills of suburban Philadelphia, Boston's location on the ocean gives it an edge for the immediate area. The water in Cape Cod & Islands may not be as warm as the Jersey Shore, but it's not exactly a stark contrast (we're not talking Key West vs. Maine here) and the Cape & Islands are infinitely more charming/beautiful (yes, subjective, but let's be honest). As I mentioned in the first paragraph, it's not as if Boston is lacking in the lush suburbs and rolling hills department either. Boston's more well rounded.

Beyond the immediate metro area, Boston wins as well- largely (but not only) because of the sea. Philadelphia has very little nearby that resembles Newport RI, Salem MA, Portsmouth NH, Portland ME, etc. It doesn't have anything close to the White Mountains (I'm a skier and I cringe every time someone tries to argue that the Poconos are comparable for skiing or hiking). The Catskills are equidistant from Philly/Boston and the Adirondacks are actually closer to Boston than Philadelphia. For truly rugged and isolated, there's nothing close to Philadelphia that matches the Maine Wilderness- it's truly unrivaled on the East Coast. There's nothing close to Philadelphia on par with Maine's coast either.

And while Philadelphia is closer to DC and NY, Boston's still plenty close (and well connected) to New York. An overnight or weekend in NYC is easy for anyone in Boston. It's also easy to do a weekend in Montreal (under 5 hours driving through really scenic country) from Boston. No weekend trip from Philadelphia offers a comparable cultural experience to a weekend in Montreal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-17-2017, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,888 posts, read 10,413,795 times
Reputation: 8055
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
I love suburban Philadelphia. But the constant droning on about the "rolling hills" equals rolling eyes over here. Suburban Philadelphia is gorgeous. And apart from some of Boston's more charming seaside communities, I'd definitely argue that suburban Philadelphia has more suburbs that are destinations in their own right. Boston has beautiful, charming, leafy suburbs among the rolling hills, but they're far more residential. You also can't argue with the fact that Philadelphia has much better access to the major Bos-Wash cities (DC, NYC, etc.).

All that being said, I think Boston offers a much more well-rounded variety of "weekend getaways" than Philadelphia. For all of the charm of the rolling hills of suburban Philadelphia, Boston's location on the ocean gives it an edge for the immediate area. The water in Cape Cod & Islands may not be as warm as the Jersey Shore, but it's not exactly a stark contrast (we're not talking Key West vs. Maine here) and the Cape & Islands are infinitely more charming/beautiful (yes, subjective, but let's be honest). As I mentioned in the first paragraph, it's not as if Boston is lacking in the lush suburbs and rolling hills department either. Boston's more well rounded.

Beyond the immediate metro area, Boston wins as well- largely (but not only) because of the sea. Philadelphia has very little nearby that resembles Newport RI, Salem MA, Portsmouth NH, Portland ME, etc. It doesn't have anything close to the White Mountains (I'm a skier and I cringe every time someone tries to argue that the Poconos are comparable for skiing or hiking). The Catskills are equidistant from Philly/Boston and the Adirondacks are actually closer to Boston than Philadelphia. For truly rugged and isolated, there's nothing close to Philadelphia that matches the Maine Wilderness- it's truly unrivaled on the East Coast. There's nothing close to Philadelphia on par with Maine's coast either.

And while Philadelphia is closer to DC and NY, Boston's still plenty close (and well connected) to New York. An overnight or weekend in NYC is easy for anyone in Boston. It's also easy to do a weekend in Montreal (under 5 hours driving through really scenic country) from Boston. No weekend trip from Philadelphia offers a comparable cultural experience to a weekend in Montreal.
Good points-some I personally disagree with but doesn't mean either of us are wrong.

One thing though-Philadelphia is only 7 hours from Montreal and is closer to Toronto than Boston is. I have done weekend trips to both, including MegaBus to Toronto. I mean, this is all a relatively small area of the country so it is almost splitting hairs.

Also, one pro for the Jersey Shore over Cape Cod is the accessibility of the ocean. The barrier islands in NJ are often
only a couple blocks wide from ocean to bay, and the beach is so much more accessible than in Cape Cod where my visits often consisted of driving-or long bike rides-to the beach from the house. It is just a very different experience than my family home in Sea Isle-which is 1.5 block walk to both the ocean and the bay.

Last edited by 2e1m5a; 05-17-2017 at 09:23 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,678 posts, read 8,230,420 times
Reputation: 2898
but what about Connecticut lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2017, 09:54 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,455 posts, read 18,381,877 times
Reputation: 11928
Quote:
Originally Posted by BPt111 View Post
but what about Connecticut lol
If there were only a quicker way to drive through it to get to NY.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2017, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,678 posts, read 8,230,420 times
Reputation: 2898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
If there were only a quicker way to drive through it to get to NY.
No love for CT it not that bad
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2017, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,061 posts, read 16,104,972 times
Reputation: 9402
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Good points-some I personally disagree with but doesn't mean either of us are wrong.

One thing though-Philadelphia is only 7 hours from Montreal and is closer to Toronto than Boston is. I have done weekend trips to both, including MegaBus to Toronto. I mean, this is all a relatively small area of the country so it is almost splitting hairs.

Also, one pro for the Jersey Shore over Cape Cod is the accessibility of the ocean. The barrier islands in NJ are often
only a couple blocks wide from ocean to bay, and the beach is so much more accessible than in Cape Cod where my visits often consisted of driving-or long bike rides-to the beach from the house. It is just a very different experience than my family home in Sea Isle-which is 1.5 block walk to both the ocean and the bay.
All good points. For me, 7 hours of driving gets out of "weekend" territory, but I know that's not a deal breaker for some. My threshold is about 4-5 hours or so (preferably 3) - about a tank of gas. At that rate, I can can sneak out of work an hour or two early on Friday and be at my destination in time for dinner (or relatively early drinks). 7 hours (again, for me) means multiple stops (gas/bathroom/food) and probably not arriving until midnight or later on a Friday. When you're talking two nights awayweekend, arriving at midnight after a long drive is just not worth it anymore for my old self. But for others (and even myself as recently as 5 or so years ago), it's doable.

Philadelphia is definitely closer to Toronto. But when I go to Toronto (my girlfriend has family there), there's no way I'm driving regardless. I always fly. Porter Airlines makes it a no-brainer from Boston. I jump on the Blue Line and am going through security 1/2 hour later. The flight is just over an hour, and I land at Billy Bishop (Not Pearson) and literally walk from the airport to downtown Toronto. There are few better downtown to downtown air connections in the world. And Porter is usually pretty cheap. I give you credit for taking the bus. I take Megabus (or one of the others) to NYC sometimes, but I really don't like it. I couldn't do it for that type of distance (though I know people who take it to DC from Boston).

You're right about the Jersey Shore. There's much better access to the ocean. No contest. I'd add that for anyone looking for a more than just quiet beach time, the Jersey Shore offers more as well. Each region is different, and each is appealing for different reasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2017, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,061 posts, read 16,104,972 times
Reputation: 9402
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Good points-some I personally disagree with but doesn't mean either of us are wrong.

One thing though-Philadelphia is only 7 hours from Montreal and is closer to Toronto than Boston is. I have done weekend trips to both, including MegaBus to Toronto. I mean, this is all a relatively small area of the country so it is almost splitting hairs.

Also, one pro for the Jersey Shore over Cape Cod is the accessibility of the ocean. The barrier islands in NJ are often
only a couple blocks wide from ocean to bay, and the beach is so much more accessible than in Cape Cod where my visits often consisted of driving-or long bike rides-to the beach from the house. It is just a very different experience than my family home in Sea Isle-which is 1.5 block walk to both the ocean and the bay.
All good points. For me, 7 hours of driving gets out of "weekend" territory, but I know that's not a deal breaker for some. My threshold is about 4-5 hours or so (preferably 3) - about a tank of gas. At that rate, I can can sneak out of work an hour or two early on Friday and be at my destination in time for dinner (or relatively early drinks). 7 hours (again, for me) means multiple stops (gas/bathroom/food) and probably not arriving until midnight or later on a Friday. When you're talking two nights away, arriving at midnight after a long drive is just not worth it anymore for my old self. But for others (and even myself as recently as 5 or so years ago), it's doable.

Philadelphia is definitely closer to Toronto. But when I go to Toronto (my girlfriend has family there), there's no way I'm driving regardless. I always fly. Porter Airlines makes it a no-brainer from Boston. I jump on the Blue Line and am going through security 1/2 hour later. The flight is just over an hour, and I land at Billy Bishop (Not Pearson) and literally walk from the airport to downtown Toronto. There are few better downtown to downtown air connections in the world. And Porter is usually pretty cheap. I give you credit for taking the bus. I take Megabus (or one of the others) to NYC sometimes, but I really don't like it. I couldn't do it for that type of distance (though I know people who take it to DC from Boston).

You're right about the Jersey Shore. There's much better access to the ocean. No contest. I'd add that for anyone looking for a more than just quiet beach time, the Jersey Shore offers more as well. Each region is different, and each is appealing for different reasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2017, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,144 posts, read 24,023,180 times
Reputation: 31060
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
People in New England tend to stay in New England for most vacation. I think there is much more of a "cottage culture" in general. I didn't live in a particularly wealthy area but generally people either owned a lake/mountain/beach house or rented the same one each year. So practically every year they would vacation to the same place. That was it that was their vacation spot.
Most people of similar economic status from other parts of the country I gather went on vacations all over the place, but did not have their own place.
That was very popular with my parents generation and the older Boomers in PA. My older brother rents a place on a lake every year and keeps a pontoon boat there. A guy I know from high school owns property on a small lake in Northern PA. There's no cottage, but a small pavilion--concrete floor and a roof--and a well with a pump. He camps there every summer.

I think there are people in other states who experienced the same thing. People are drawn to water. Wherever there's a spring, stream, creek, river, pond or lake, there'll be some cottages or year 'round residents.

I love the whole region. I'm happy that I got to grow up in a small city in PA. There were plenty of things in the area to see and do. Best of all, we could be out of town in 15 minutes and walking along a creek. The dogs loved it.

This whole "my **** is bigger than yours" nonsense is trying.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2017, 10:46 AM
 
9,412 posts, read 9,575,655 times
Reputation: 5837
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
That was very popular with my parents generation and the older Boomers in PA. My older brother rents a place on a lake every year and keeps a pontoon boat there. A guy I know from high school owns property on a small lake in Northern PA. There's no cottage, but a small pavilion--concrete floor and a roof--and a well with a pump. He camps there every summer.

I think there are people in other states who experienced the same thing. People are drawn to water. Wherever there's a spring, stream, creek, river, pond or lake, there'll be some cottages or year 'round residents.

I love the whole region. I'm happy that I got to grow up in a small city in PA. There were plenty of things in the area to see and do. Best of all, we could be out of town in 15 minutes and walking along a creek. The dogs loved it.

This whole "my **** is bigger than yours" nonsense is trying.
I'm not saying that people elsewhere do not have places up in mountains, on Rivers/lakes but from my experience people from particularly Eastern New England tend to have a stronger "cottage culture" while people from other parts of the country tend to go on vacation to a variety of places.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2017, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
11,766 posts, read 8,331,681 times
Reputation: 5825
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalentedDrinker View Post
Is this a joke?

You ever heard of the Adirondacks? They're larger than anything on the East Coast. You can fit New Hampshire in the Adirondacks.

Honestly, it's so annoying how underrated they are on here. It almost pisses me off how oblivious people are.

New Yorkers and Jerseyans go to the Catskills and Adirondacks. I would know. I rent my cabin to them constantly.
Boston is as close to the Adirondacks as NYC is.

I think Boston wins because of its proximity to Maine. People who haven't been there don't realize how incredible Maine is.

Last edited by Mr. Joshua; 05-17-2017 at 11:25 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top