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Old 05-09-2017, 09:18 AM
 
169 posts, read 137,046 times
Reputation: 90

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My family is currently living in the New York City suburbs and starting to feel a little burnt out with day-to-day living. We have a very good situation job-wise, but between commuting and the day-to-day hustle of living, there's not much time left for having much of a life. We really don't do much aside from working and then trying to get a little relaxation on weekends since we're so wiped out.

So my question is, who has moved away from a metropolitan area to escape the grind and how did it turn out for you? Any noticeable improvement to day-to-day living? Any challenges? What city were you in and where did you move to?
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Old 05-09-2017, 10:10 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,161 posts, read 654,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CT356 View Post
My family is currently living in the New York City suburbs and starting to feel a little burnt out with day-to-day living. We have a very good situation job-wise, but between commuting and the day-to-day hustle of living, there's not much time left for having much of a life. We really don't do much aside from working and then trying to get a little relaxation on weekends since we're so wiped out.

So my question is, who has moved away from a metropolitan area to escape the grind and how did it turn out for you? Any noticeable improvement to day-to-day living? Any challenges? What city were you in and where did you move to?
My uncle lived and worked in Manhattan for 15+ years and made good money, even by New York standards. Like you, he eventually got burnt out of 'living to work', the crowds, the expenses, and all the other hassles of Manhattan living. He took his New York money, moved to an exurb, and lives like a king because he is still making New York-level money (he works remotely most days) but has a much lower cost of living. He always tells me how nice it is to be able to easily drive everywhere, not have to worry about parking, and not have to fight with a million other people, and just as many tourists, to get everywhere. He says he occasionally misses the diversity of things to do that the city offers, but he much more now enjoys his life of peace and quiet and wealth. He still lives close enough to where he can drive or MetroNorth into the city if he wants to.
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Old 05-09-2017, 10:25 AM
 
169 posts, read 137,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
My uncle lived and worked in Manhattan for 15+ years and made good money, even by New York standards. Like you, he eventually got burnt out of 'living to work', the crowds, the expenses, and all the other hassles of Manhattan living. He took his New York money, moved to an exurb, and lives like a king because he is still making New York-level money (he works remotely most days) but has a much lower cost of living. He always tells me how nice it is to be able to easily drive everywhere, not have to worry about parking, and not have to fight with a million other people, and just as many tourists, to get everywhere. He says he occasionally misses the diversity of things to do that the city offers, but he much more now enjoys his life of peace and quiet and wealth. He still lives close enough to where he can drive or MetroNorth into the city if he wants to.
That's interesting that your uncle stayed in the general area, yet still found a much better situation. It sounds like he found exactly what I'm looking for. If you don't mind me asking, how far north did he have to go to find that balance? I think I could swing a few work-from-home days but I would probably still need to go into the office a few times a week.
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Old 05-09-2017, 10:50 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,161 posts, read 654,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CT356 View Post
That's interesting that your uncle stayed in the general area, yet still found a much better situation. It sounds like he found exactly what I'm looking for. If you don't mind me asking, how far north did he have to go to find that balance? I think I could swing a few work-from-home days but I would probably still need to go into the office a few times a week.
He lives in the upper reaches of Westchester County.
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Old 05-09-2017, 12:53 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,522,521 times
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I moved from Louisville, KY to San Francisco, CA. It did better my life in the aspect of career advancement & money with my current company.

However, the pace & style of life out here is much different than KY, and my wife and I do NOT like it here. While we enjoy the scenery, the overall lifestyle is not for us. We will be relocating in about a year, definitely back to East Coast or South.
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Old 05-09-2017, 01:02 PM
 
1,469 posts, read 1,298,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CT356 View Post
We have a very good situation job-wise, but between commuting and the day-to-day hustle of living, there's not much time left for having much of a life. We really don't do much aside from working and then trying to get a little relaxation on weekends since we're so wiped out.

So my question is, who has moved away from a metropolitan area to escape the grind and how did it turn out for you? Any noticeable improvement to day-to-day living? Any challenges? What city were you in and where did you move to?
The thing nobody tells you is the easiest way to improve your life is to:

1. Reduce your commute.
2. Reduce your desire for material things/live simply (it's easier to save money than it is to make more).
3. Reduce your suffering and do for others.

And 50% of your overall happiness is what you make it and 50% is the hand you were dealt (overall ability to be happy).

I'd say the quickest and easiest thing you can do that gives you the most return on quality of life is to cut your commute down. Or if you're like I am and enjoy walking live somewhere you can actually walk to work.

Pretty much you just have to ask yourself what you need and then make sure to pick a place to live that has the most of those things while at the same time doesn't have any deal breakers. Pretty much any city can be hell if you're in the wrong place and perfectly fine if you're in an area that works for you.
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Old 05-09-2017, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,138,052 times
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To answer the original question, no. I moved away from my hometown, which was a major metropolis. I traded it in for a 100K population city. There were a few nice changes, but overall, it was a huge mistake. All the big city stuff that I thought I was sick of brought lots of opportunities and possibilities along with it. The current town is sleepy, boring, and limited (including jobs and mindsets/opinions/diversity).

I recommend that people don't relocate to a vastly different area culturally, where people think and see things very differently. You can end up feeling in exile, like in a foreign country.

Beware also of stepping into a location where everything costs more. None of the costs may be worthwhile and/or justify the increases. Even "Best of" polls and ratings can be meaningless.

Last edited by Thoreau424; 05-09-2017 at 02:07 PM..
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Old 05-09-2017, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,059 posts, read 3,379,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
To answer the original question, no. I moved away from my hometown, which was a major metropolis. I traded it in for a 100K population city. There were a few nice changes, but overall, it was a huge mistake. All the big city stuff that I thought I was sick of brought lots of opportunities and possibilities along with it. The current town is sleepy, boring, and limited (including jobs and mindsets/opinions/diversity).

I recommend that people don't relocate to a vastly different area culturally, where people think and see things very differently.
You can end up feeling in exile, like in a foreign country.

Beware also of stepping into a location where everything costs more. None of the costs may be worthwhile and/or justify the increases. Even "Best of" polls and ratings can be meaningless.
I disagree, part of the problem with our society is so many people can't fathom how other people can think differently. They're all in their echo chambers and are afraid of other perspectives. I moved from a metro area of 5 million to a small town of 4,000 or so. While I would never move back to that town, I did meet a lot of new people and gained a new perspective on life that I'm grateful for. Also, the issue isn't "small towns' its more "THAT particular town, and towns similar to it." I could totally do a nice small town in the future when I'm older and have a family.
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Old 05-09-2017, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,059 posts, read 3,379,100 times
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Yes. I grew up in Miami and became to loathe it as I grew older. I became aware of the culture dissonance of Miami. A city where English is a second language, where rudeness and aggression are socially accepted and friendliness is seen as alien, a place where the weather is almost always oppressively hot and humid and where I just didn't feel I belong. Still my hometown, still where I grew up, still love the beach but... I needed to go somewhere else.

I moved to Texas after falling in love with a Texan and moving in with him. Tumbled all over west Texas before settling up here in north Texas. Texas was never somewhere I imagined living. But Texas is the kind of place that grows on you. Its a large and rich state with a lot of geographic and cultural diversity, but its still unified under a STRONG Texas pride. This is so different from Florida. Florida doesn't have this cultural unity or state pride. Not to even close of this level. Those of us from Florida either wanna stay or wanna move. There's not as much of "ehh yea its home but if I get a chance I'll move but I'm not seeking to right now.." like in other places. A lot of Floridians head north where its cooler and less flat, and a lot of northerners head to Florida and see it as nothing more than a warm place. They have no ties to the area and even care about the community for the most part. They still are more tied to their homestates. So Florida doesn't have that strong pride and identity that Texas does.

But as much as I like Texas, its also not where I feel I belong. My relationship is over and I have nothing holding me back. I'm planning on moving to Minnesota this summer, a place I love. Something about being up north, and being even more different from where I came from... its gravitating me there lol. I'll move this summer and I can tell its gonna be for the better. I enjoyed Texas even when I had no interest of being there prior to a relationship, now I'm moving where I've wanted to be for years, but by myself and for myself, and that makes a hell of a difference, honestly.
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Old 05-10-2017, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
4,948 posts, read 7,873,797 times
Reputation: 10420
I'm not a people person at all, so my moving to a low population area, while not a perfect life, simplifies things for me and for someone like me who abhors crowds and congestion, it is definitely a life quality improvement. Some people would probably be bored to death where I live.
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