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Old 05-10-2017, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
1,461 posts, read 1,445,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityGuyForLife View Post
That's actually a clear argument against them becoming capitals. Only 17 capitals are actually the largest cities in their states--the rest are not. Besides the prohibitive financial cost of relocating a capital, there's the political one. Republicans would never stand for the capital moving to a large, Democratic stronghold, which nearly all of the largest cities in our states are.
Most capitals are Democratic strongholds anyway, but this paradigm where the parties are organized by urban vs rural is a temporary one. The coalitions that make up the parties shift over time. It wasn't long ago that Republicans frequently won New York and California, and that the most right wing state in the Union was Vermont, which never once voted for FDR (now it is probably the most left wing state).

100 years from now the electoral map will look totally different yet again.
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Old 05-10-2017, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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America is an oddity in the western world, in most western countries, the capital cities ARE the biggest cities (mainly talking Western Europe and Australia)
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Old 05-10-2017, 11:49 AM
 
Location: 352
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Why? I don't see why any capital would move. That'd be a pretty costly move all around. I can't see anything moving anytime soon. Only way I could see it was if the entire landscape of America changed.
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Old 05-10-2017, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,511 posts, read 2,970,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Well if you include capitals that are part of their state's largest metro area (like St. Paul and Nashville) or others that are among the major economic and cultural hubs of their states (Richmond, Raleigh, Baton Rouge, Austin, etc.), that gives you roughly half of all state capitals. But I completely agree with your overall point, especially the political one.
Very true and I overlooked that fact in my Google haste.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bitey View Post
The particulars of Chicago and New York are not just the fact that they are the largest city in their respective states, but that they, or at least their metro areas, house a huge majority of the state's population. Like I mentioned earlier, a great deal of the state's business is already conducted in those cities -- in fact I wouldn't be surprised of more state employees work in and around CHI and NYC than Springfield and Albany -- along with all the facilities where that work is done that it's almost redundant to have the capital elsewhere.

Meanwhile, I don't think Republicans in either state have enough clout to stop the Democrats from doing much of anything, at least not in the long term.
True, but America was founded on limiting governmental power. None of our current most populous capitals are city-states in the way Chicago or New York would effectively be. Furthermore, while NYC and Chicago have massive populations, there significant urban areas outside of their grasp (Metro East, Buffalo, Rochester, etc.). A capital outside of those cities makes sense, to keep NYC and Chicago from becoming too powerful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vatnos View Post
Most capitals are Democratic strongholds anyway, but this paradigm where the parties are organized by urban vs rural is a temporary one. The coalitions that make up the parties shift over time. It wasn't long ago that Republicans frequently won New York and California, and that the most right wing state in the Union was Vermont, which never once voted for FDR (now it is probably the most left wing state).

100 years from now the electoral map will look totally different yet again.
Very true. One can only imagine the divisions then (in the vein of sci-fi, the upper city vs the slums?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
America is an oddity in the western world, in most western countries, the capital cities ARE the biggest cities (mainly talking Western Europe and Australia)
Mainly true for Europe due to age, but not necessarily for the rest of the West. Australia's capital city of Canberra is far from being its most populous city/metro, while Wellington significantly trails Auckland in New Zealand. Ottawa is not Canada's largest city. At the state/territory/province level, your observation is true, but then again, none of those other countries even come close to America's overall population. If they had larger populations in their states/territories/provinces, then their might be calls for more separation of power.
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Old 05-10-2017, 12:16 PM
 
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I always thought State College, PA should be the capital of PA. Harrisburg is too far South and East, IMO.
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Old 05-10-2017, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityGuyForLife View Post
Very true and I overlooked that fact in my Google haste.



True, but America was founded on limiting governmental power. None of our current most populous capitals are city-states in the way Chicago or New York would effectively be. Furthermore, while NYC and Chicago have massive populations, there significant urban areas outside of their grasp (Metro East, Buffalo, Rochester, etc.). A capital outside of those cities makes sense, to keep NYC and Chicago from becoming too powerful.



Very true. One can only imagine the divisions then (in the vein of sci-fi, the upper city vs the slums?)



Mainly true for Europe due to age, but not necessarily for the rest of the West. Australia's capital city of Canberra is far from being its most populous city/metro, while Wellington significantly trails Auckland in New Zealand. Ottawa is not Canada's largest city. At the state/territory/province level, your observation is true, but then again, none of those other countries even come close to America's overall population. If they had larger populations in their states/territories/provinces, then their might be calls for more separation of power.
I was referring to state/province captials as well, not just national capitals. So in Australia, you have Perth (capital and biggest city of Western Australia), Darwin (capital and largest city of Northern Territory), Adelaide (capital and largest city of South Australia), Melbourne (capital and largest city of Victoria), Sydney (capital and largest city of New South Wales) and Brisbane (capital and largest city of Queensland). So in every Australian state, the capital is the largest city. That was my point.
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Old 05-10-2017, 12:41 PM
 
Location: 304
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With most state sponsored services going online, and state representatives only meeting a certain times each year, it makes no sense for a capitol to relocate. Before location played a larger role, but honestly now it doesn't.
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Old 05-10-2017, 12:57 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,796,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
I was referring to state/province captials as well, not just national capitals. So in Australia, you have Perth (capital and biggest city of Western Australia), Darwin (capital and largest city of Northern Territory), Adelaide (capital and largest city of South Australia), Melbourne (capital and largest city of Victoria), Sydney (capital and largest city of New South Wales) and Brisbane (capital and largest city of Queensland). So in every Australian state, the capital is the largest city. That was my point.
Comparing Australia, with a combined population of less than Texas, with the US and its states & capitals is an apples to oranges comparison. Many US states have multiple cities that are significant enough to be considered a capital city. In Texas alone, Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, Ft. Worth and Austin are all significant sized cities. California has a very similar situation with L.A, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento.

Many US Capital cities are located where they are based on geography relative to their state and/or relative to how they were accessed from the population of the state when established. Some of these cities took off as economic engines of their own (regardless of whether or not it's the largest city in the state), while others did not. The operation of government for a state neither has a dependency on it being in the state's largest economic engine nor does the largest city have the dependency on being the capital to assure its success. In a non-gerrymandered ideal, each city within each state will have state government representation commensurate with its population.
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Old 05-10-2017, 02:25 PM
 
17,662 posts, read 4,062,179 times
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I doubt that state capitals will ever be changed.
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Old 05-10-2017, 02:52 PM
 
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Besides Juneau Alaska......Tallahassee Florida would be a good candidate, it may have been centrally located in the 1880s, but now is very far from the center of population.
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