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Old 05-12-2017, 12:58 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
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You're from the South? Have you ever lived in a heavy winter state? Walkable means freezing your tail off about half of the year. And it's no fun standing at a bus stop or on a train platform when the wind chill is -10 degrees.
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Old 05-12-2017, 04:31 PM
 
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St. Louis is doable without a car. LRT is extremely efficient and busses pretty much are on time if there is nothing going on like bad weather or accidents.

Major employment centers like Downtown, Central West End and Clayton are covered by LRT. Wash U, St Louis University and UM St. Louis are covered as well. Scott AFB and Lambert airport is served by Metrolink as well. 2 lines run trains every 20 minutes off peak. More frequently on peak. If your commute only involves using LRT between Fairview Heights and Forest Park, trains run every 10 minutes off peak. Total coverage is 48 miles with more in the planning stages.

Most suburban bus lines feed into Metrolink suburban stations making many commutes into St. Louis county ok but commuting suburb to suburb a nightmare if not impossible. Many of the suburban Bus lines run until 10 or 11 at night.

St. Louis has some of the lowest gas prices in the country and doesn't have major traffic problems thanks to an ok grid and excellent freeway system. It is much easier to have a car then use only public transportation.

These are my observations without living in or using transit in other cities listed. I did live in Chicago and they have the best bus system in the nation with the second best rail system between the El and Metra. Metro in St Louis doesn't compare by size and convenience but metro does do better with on time performance and cleanliness.
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Old 05-12-2017, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Kennedy Heights, Ohio. USA
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Cincinnati is doable without a car in the walkable urban neighborhoods such as Over the Rhine, Pendleton, Clifton, Clifton Heights, Corryville, Northside, Walnut Hills, East Walnut Hills, Mount Auburn, Mount Adams, O'Bryonville and Oakley. Across the river in the Covington Kentucky urban neighborhoods such as Mutter Gottes, Licking Riverside, Mainstrasse Village, Eastside, Downtown and Westside. All these urban neighborhoods on both sides of the Ohio River has access to good bus service.

Last edited by Coseau; 05-12-2017 at 06:24 PM..
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Old 05-13-2017, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,655,251 times
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I have lived in the Cleveland area for three years now without a car. As in most cities, you have to research which neighborhoods are served by the most convenient public transportation services because unless you are talking about cities like New York or Chicago, city neighborhoods will differ in this.
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Old 05-13-2017, 08:55 AM
 
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As far as Cleveland goes...I'd say Downtown and maybe University Circle.
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Old 05-13-2017, 10:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
You're from the South? Have you ever lived in a heavy winter state? Walkable means freezing your tail off about half of the year. And it's no fun standing at a bus stop or on a train platform when the wind chill is -10 degrees.
For some it's not a problem. I grew up in FL and absolutely love the cold. I dress lighter for winter than some who have lived in cold climates their whole lives. Depends how well you can adjust, which I'm guessing the OP can.
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Old 05-13-2017, 11:08 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Portuga View Post
I am a single person with a degree that allows me to find work easily anywhere. I am considering leaving the south but not sure where I want to go. I have narrowed the choices down to those cities.

My desire is to live in an ethnically diverse urban setting, whether it's studio or small house, the most important thing I want it's a city with good public transportation and walkable. I hate driving.

Which one would best fit me?
  1. Saint Louis MO
  2. Minneapolis MN
  3. Milwaukee WI
  4. Cleveland OH
  5. Cincinnati OH
  6. Pittsburgh PA


Thanks a lot!
You're going to find living car free in any of those cities to frankly be limiting. I currently live car free in Chicago, and I would almost certainly get a car if I was moving to any of these places.

Additionally, you might be disappointed about how diverse some of these cities are. I'm not certain where you're coming from in the South, so some of them might be more diverse than where you're coming from, but they're not exactly known as beacons of diversity. Most also have segregation issues, which is admittedly a huge issue here in Chicago as well, so I'm not knocking them. It's just something you should be ready for.
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Old 05-13-2017, 11:45 AM
 
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There are a lot of neighborhoods in Pittsburgh that you could go carless, and its done quite frequently. Probably moreso than the other cities on your list. The larger ones are

North Side
Lawrenceville
Strip District
Downtown
South Side
Oakland
Bloomfield
Shadyside
East Liberty
Squirrel Hill

There are also some dense streetcar suburbs, such as Dormont and Mt. Lebanon, to the south of the city that offer some aspects of city-like living but also a selection of single family homes, if you'd prefer that to the apts or rowhouses you would likely get in the city. They also have access to light rail.

Minneapolis I think also has quite a few, although personally the winters would terrify me, I imagine going carless there in the winter there would take a really rugged person.
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Old 05-13-2017, 11:49 AM
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11,386 posts, read 10,513,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
You're going to find living car free in any of those cities to frankly be limiting. I currently live car free in Chicago, and I would almost certainly get a car if I was moving to any of these places.

Additionally, you might be disappointed about how diverse some of these cities are. I'm not certain where you're coming from in the South, so some of them might be more diverse than where you're coming from, but they're not exactly known as beacons of diversity. Most also have segregation issues, which is admittedly a huge issue here in Chicago as well, so I'm not knocking them. It's just something you should be ready for.
Limiting? Have you been to Minneapolis? It's no different than living car free somewhere like Seattle. In any case, it's about choosing the right neighborhood...especially for some of those other cities.
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Old 05-13-2017, 02:11 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,483 posts, read 2,223,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Limiting? Have you been to Minneapolis? It's no different than living car free somewhere like Seattle. In any case, it's about choosing the right neighborhood...especially for some of those other cities.
Yes, limiting. I've been multiple times, and I've used their Metro system. I wouldn't anymore live there without a car than I would in St. Louis.

Mind you, I'm not saying that it's not possible or that people don't do it, I'm just saying that it's limiting in comparison to cities with more extensive systems. Hence why I'd personally have a car if I lived there.
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