U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-13-2017, 05:04 PM
 
5,612 posts, read 6,093,359 times
Reputation: 4184

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
Yes, limiting. I've been multiple times, and I've used their Metro system. I wouldn't anymore live there without a car than I would in St. Louis.

Mind you, I'm not saying that it's not possible or that people don't do it, I'm just saying that it's limiting in comparison to cities with more extensive systems. Hence why I'd personally have a car if I lived there.
Very interesting. I was thinking that most midsized cities are about the same in terms of accessibility to rail and bus transit. Most cities dont have the density nor the money to build expensive HRT and LRT to make cities less car dependent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-13-2017, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
552 posts, read 314,482 times
Reputation: 838
Cleveland has heavy rail (red line) between the airport, downtown, University Circle and Little Italy. That gets you the lion's share of job centers in Cleveland proper including the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, CWRU. You also get Ohio City and the West Side Market as well as several west side and east side stations. The green line (light rail) goes into Shaker Heights for suburban housing and apartments as well as shopping and restaurants. The blue line (light rail) goes further south towards Beachwood and Warrensville. The blue line also gets you to the Van Aken shopping center and employment centers along Chagrin and Warrensville. You can also take the Waterfront line (light rail) around the outskirts of downtown along the river, mainly the flats entertainment district, browns stadium, and E. 9th St. pier. There are also BRTs that operate between downtown and University Circle and between downtown and Lakewood, this would get you more apartments and job opportunities. Downtown Cleveland is also served by 3 free trolley lines (buses that look like trolleys) that circulate regularly. This is all augmented by an extensive county wide bus system. So you can live car free, many do. But many don't, which is why we struggle in this country with supporting our public transportation systems. Use it or lose it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2017, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
992 posts, read 578,368 times
Reputation: 601
Of the list, all except Columbus and Milwaukee would work. Is there a reason you're limiting yourself to those six cities specifically?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2017, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,029 posts, read 23,924,861 times
Reputation: 30917
Quote:
Originally Posted by CA-CHI-CO View Post
Why not Chicago? Diverse - check. Walkable - check. Good transit - check. Obviously weather isn't an issue for you given your other choices.
Why not Philadelphia? It checks all of the same boxes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2017, 07:44 AM
PDF
 
11,386 posts, read 10,521,282 times
Reputation: 6606
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtinmemphis View Post
Very interesting. I was thinking that most midsized cities are about the same in terms of accessibility to rail and bus transit. Most cities dont have the density nor the money to build expensive HRT and LRT to make cities less car dependent.
I agree. IMO there's a gap between Minneapolis and these other cities. Not limiting at all. Perhaps for someone coming from NYC, or someone who will be working in the suburbs. Minneapolis is one of the top cities to live car free...outside of the usual suspects of course.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2017, 07:51 AM
 
2,167 posts, read 1,464,246 times
Reputation: 2176
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
I agree. IMO there's a gap between Minneapolis and these other cities. Not limiting at all. Perhaps for someone coming from NYC, or someone who will be working in the suburbs. Minneapolis is one of the top cities to live car free...outside of the usual suspects of course.
Maybe for people very used to the cold, but most people moving from elsewhere aren't going to want to go car free in Minneapolis during the winter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2017, 08:13 AM
PDF
 
11,386 posts, read 10,521,282 times
Reputation: 6606
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
Maybe for people very used to the cold, but most people moving from elsewhere aren't going to want to go car free in Minneapolis during the winter.
Maybe. You could say the same about the other cities too. At a certain point, cold is cold.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2017, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,316 posts, read 6,972,968 times
Reputation: 3504
Of course this depends on your work location, but I think you can definitely survive in any of those places with no car. Broadly speaking, I think it is most doable and enjoyable in Minneapolis, but ultimately the best choice would depend on where exactly you work in any of these 6 cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2017, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Kennedy Heights, Ohio. USA
1,823 posts, read 1,495,363 times
Reputation: 1424
The thing about Cincinnati is that most of the city gives a sleepy village type feel. You might not get the excitement you may be craving of an big urban center. Instead of feeling like a city it feels and function like a bunch of a small European like densely built towns or villages in close proximity next to one another with the same type of vibe. Even the architectural structures resemble European cities giving that they were built by the same immigrant people who learnt their trade by building the same types of structures in Germany in the mid 1800's thus giving the neighborhoods names like Over The Rhine, Mutter Gottes, and MainStrasse Village.

Last edited by Coseau; 05-14-2017 at 05:06 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2017, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,055,722 times
Reputation: 3925
I've lived car free in Minneapolis for a number of years, but I have also had a car off and on, and have had one for the last six years. I find the cold bothered me less when I didn't have a car than when I did. When you are car free you are out in the cold a lot more and become acclimated to it pretty quickly. As long as it wasn't -20 with wind it wasn't an issue after the first few cold days. Also, climate change has taken a toll on Minnesota winters - other than the flukish polar vortex winter of 2014 they haven't been what they once were.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top