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Old 05-18-2017, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,565 posts, read 745,388 times
Reputation: 1668

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Quote:
Originally Posted by floridaboy92 View Post
The nostalgia I hear about the older Florida before the rapid development came saddens me and I wish that I could have seen it back then.
I would think some of the less populous counties in the central peninsula like Hardee, DeSoto, Highlands and Okeechobee reflect the older Florida even today. Not all of the state is so bustling and heavily developed.
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Old 05-18-2017, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,383,155 times
Reputation: 7710
Quote:
Originally Posted by floridaboy92 View Post
The nostalgia I hear about the older Florida before the rapid development came saddens me and I wish that I could have seen it back then.

I feel like coastal Florida back in the day was more similar to coastal South Carolina, now. Lotta laid back beach towns, plenty of places to party, still lots of tourists but not the congested mess it is now. I hope the Panhandle doesn't because as condo-ified and as built up as much of the rest of the state. I love the vibe in the southern Alabama/northwest Florida area.
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Old 05-18-2017, 05:55 PM
 
Location: No Man's Land
153 posts, read 148,052 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by jas75 View Post
I would think some of the less populous counties in the central peninsula like Hardee, DeSoto, Highlands and Okeechobee reflect the older Florida even today. Not all of the state is so bustling and heavily developed.
This is true. When I lived down there for school, I did discover some places that had a lot of tranquility left still.
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Old 05-30-2017, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,205 posts, read 1,299,411 times
Reputation: 2050
Southern New England. MA CT RI

They're more dominated by their urban character now than in 1967 and muuuuuch more racially diverse. IN 1967 all of those states were 95+ whit now theyre on average about 70% white and much larger populations. The 'urban' feel has really expanded throughout the region and these states have lost most of their New England hype regional department stores and restaurant These states feel more like NJ now than NH.
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Old 05-30-2017, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
Reputation: 10536
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
They're more dominated by their urban character now than in 1967 and muuuuuch more racially diverse. IN 1967 all of those states were 95+ whit now theyre on average about 70% white and much larger populations. The 'urban' feel has really expanded throughout the region and these states have lost most of their New England hype regional department stores and restaurant These states feel more like NJ now than NH.
I grew up in Connecticut, and I really disagree with the bolded point. With the exception of the infill in downtown Stamford, I don't think any city in Connecticut has urbanized over the last 50 years to a significant extent. In general, the cities are less urban, with a lot more of their traditional built fabric lost to parking lots or simple urban decay.
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Old 05-30-2017, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,826,606 times
Reputation: 2858
NC might as well be a northern state or the East Coast's Arizona. I don't even consider the Southeast part of the true South. The Delta region is the only area left with southern charm.

Last edited by bluecarebear; 05-30-2017 at 09:26 PM..
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Old 05-31-2017, 12:15 PM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,137,928 times
Reputation: 1850
Salt Lake City has changed dramatically since I lived there in the '60s. Since then you have real "bars" that serve "liquor-by-the drink", no more private clubs. Although the metro is still quite conservative, the city itself has been listed as an LTGBQ "top places to live". The mayor is a Democrat woman, Catholic, married, with children. If somebody had said that was possible in 1969, you'd be institutionalized.
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Old 05-31-2017, 01:30 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 11,434,710 times
Reputation: 12307
Detroit.
Fifty years ago the Detroit race riots erupted when the city was 28% Black. Now it is somewhere around 83%.
Fifty years ago the Detroit auto manufacturing plants dominated the city and US auto sales. Now most of the plants have shut down and foreign cars dominate.
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Old 05-31-2017, 04:45 PM
 
Location: IN
20,847 posts, read 35,942,861 times
Reputation: 13287
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
NC might as well be a northern state or the East Coast's Arizona. I don't even consider the Southeast part of the true South. The Delta region is the only area left with southern charm.
It is the least representative of the South because fewer people live there in percentage terms with each passing year. It continues to see strong out-migration and population declines among most of the counties in the region.
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Old 05-31-2017, 04:59 PM
sub
 
783 posts, read 407,911 times
Reputation: 1356
Culturally, the Delta is the most traditionally southern place left.
The rest of the south, even North Carolina, has plenty of southern traits left in the rural areas.
I didn't used to like the south because I didn't fit in. Now I don't like it because it's just so bland and bad at growth, planning, and infrustructure. A lot of wierd, endless sprawl even in small towns, with house trailers and metal buildings galore. aside from jobs and cheap living, I do not understand the appeal.

Last edited by sub; 05-31-2017 at 05:09 PM..
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