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Old 06-04-2017, 09:41 AM
 
483 posts, read 422,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
The minority I was referring to was Anglo-American and the language I was referring to is English. So I am confused as to what you are referring to with "them".
True for Hawaii too!
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Old 06-04-2017, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
The urbanization of the towns immediately surrounding the traditional cities is what I'm getting at.
That's not urbanization, that's suburbanization. Urbanization implies things like satellite CBDs (like Bellvue, WA, or the ones in Northern Virginia) with office towers, new apartment buildings built flush with the sidewalk, walkable infrastructure, etc. Connecticut mostly just builds detached single-family houses, strip malls, and industrial and office parks.
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Old 06-07-2017, 10:42 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,136,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
california without a doubt. In 1967 it was still very white and conservative. Ronald reagan had just been elected governor.
+1
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Old 06-07-2017, 01:00 PM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,333,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
That's not urbanization, that's suburbanization. Urbanization implies things like satellite CBDs (like Bellvue, WA, or the ones in Northern Virginia) with office towers, new apartment buildings built flush with the sidewalk, walkable infrastructure, etc. Connecticut mostly just builds detached single-family houses, strip malls, and industrial and office parks.
I think he means "urbanization" in a general sense, i.e. more people and more development, and not in a specialized sense where "urban" is contrasted with "suburban."
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Old 06-08-2017, 06:38 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,948,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You can't be serious. You're obviously very unfamiliar with the Southeast outside of the core of the larger metro areas.
In the last year and a half, I've driven many of the secondary roads across Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama, and even a few in Florida, North Carolina and Tennessee as well. Southern culture is alive and well outside the major metropolitan areas.

Two months ago, I drove the entire length of SC 72 from Lake Hartwell to its eastern terminus in Rock Hill. I stopped at a gas station in Calhoun Falls to get some gas, and ended up buying myself lunch there: giant spicy chicken wings with potato wedges, turnip greens, and homemade macaroni and cheese. Heaven. After that, I passed through Greenwood and stopped at Lake Greenwood, which had plenty of boats and jet skis out and about on the first warm weekend of the year, and then I stopped in Clinton to take a look at the campus of Presbyterian University. Then I was off through Sumter National Forest, over the Tyger River and past Chester to Rock Hill, which has become a big suburb of Charlotte with a quaint central business district. I bought a Moon Pie and a can of Cheerwine at a convenience store there. Along the 128-mile route, I counted 13 Confederate flags, and those were just the ones I saw from the one road I traveled. You won't find many Confederate flags in the urban cores of Atlanta or Charlotte, but they're still everywhere in the rural areas, and even the exurban fringes of those major cities. (Last month I drove the entire length of the Appalachian Foothills Scenic Byway in South Carolina, and I counted 11 more Confederate flags from the road.)

So yeah, anybody who thinks that there's no Southern culture left in the Carolinas or Georgia isn't even looking, really. Same with the majority of Florida, for that matter.
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Old 06-08-2017, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,535,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
Ever heard of a little subculture called the hippies? Sure, in the hindsight of a half century, it seems quaint, but what they did over at Berkeley, Haight-Asbury, Monterrey, and other "hip" spots really was quite a shift compared to the more classically glamorous 1950s/early '60s. Sure, its a lot more Hispanic/Asian and a little less black/white, but California is still California, just with a fresh look for each wave of youth, and was basically a purple state leaning blue back then. Now if you compared 1917 to 1967, then California would probably be the winner thanks to Hollywood, the aerospace boom, the popularization of car culture, and the WWII support for the Pacific Theater.

I'd say Texas, Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, the eastern half of Tennessee, the Pac NW, Arizona, Nevada, and DC/Virginia win this, with NYC not far behind as is expected for a juggernaut. These were just starting to be seen as future hotspots, and is a prime example of how technology made the country/world smaller. The south was barely out of the Jim Crow era 50 years ago for goodness sakes, and much of it resembles what the rest of America outside most of the Midwest was about a generation ago, with more neutral accents.

The Midwest (outside of the largest cities), Alaska, and rural deep south loses.
East TN hasn't changed that much. I'm only 31, but my hometown in east TN hasn't really changed culturally in 20+ years. We're still 95%+ white. Not a lot of new growth or development.

I grew up watching and playing baseball in the summer at my grandparents, playing outside a lot. My barber is 90, grew up in eastern KY, and has many of the same childhood memories. The younger generation has been greatly influenced by technology, but that's everywhere.
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