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View Poll Results: The average Midwesterner fits better in
The Northeast 56 40.58%
The South 82 59.42%
Voters: 138. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-29-2017, 09:04 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,146 posts, read 1,528,087 times
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What is this thing about, where people bring up the South and automatically think of the rural areas? lol.
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Old 05-30-2017, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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I was raised in the upper Midwest, live in the south and have traveled extensively. I am convinced most Midwest people would adapt better to southern culture rather than northeast culture. Northeastern people are very fast paced, aggressive and down to business. The polite small talk you find a lot of in the south and a fair bit in the Midwest would be considered intrusive and unwanted in the northeast. Also social values lean to the right a bit in most Midwest places, even states that vote blue. The extreme progressive positions commonly held in New York would be alien states like Wisconsin or Ohio. It's a much smaller gap between the values of the Midwest and those of the northeast. Even urban Midwest people from Chicago or Detroit are not really like thier counterparts in New York and Boston, they are STILL midwestern. I'm going with the south on this one.
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Old 05-30-2017, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Boston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Wait, what?

Ohio used to be part of Connecticut?
yea it was the estern reserve, not technically a part of Connecticut but very closely tied to it. There still is some weird vague connecticon between ohio and connecticut, i've noticed.
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Old 05-30-2017, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Overall, what I get out of this thread is that a lot of people from outside of the Northeast have extreme stereotypes about the region. They seem to believe that everyone there is hyper-liberal, everyone lives in a big congested city, only BosWash counts as the Northeast, etc. This is a fallacy. Vermont and Maine, for example, are the two most rural states in the country.

I still maintain that Midwesterners fit in better in the Northeast, because no matter what part of the Midwest you're from, there is a culturally similar area of the Northeast. Even someone with a bit of a southern twang from in the Ohio Valley would fit in well in Central PA or (if you consider them parts of the Northeast) the rural parts of Maryland and Delaware. Sure, they'd fit in better in the South, but they could still find places in the Northeast to fit in. In contrast, there are a lot of Midwesterners - city dwellers, people from the Upper Midwest, and to a lesser extent generic suburbanites - who would probably feel more at home in the Northeast - unless they were moving to transplant-heavy areas of the South, which have lost most traces of southern culture anyway.
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Old 05-30-2017, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio all voted for Trump though. Plus there's also Iowa, the Dakotas, Indiana, Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska. Illinois and Minnesota were in the minority. I think that does imply that the average Midwesterner would fit in better in The South.

But someone from Chicagoland for example would probably much more easily fit in the Northeast. Of course it varies by cities & regions but you put a lot of emphasis on the world "average" so that was my reasoning.
I know I'm running the risk of introducing a controversial topic, but the results of the 2016 election specifically demonstrate that there was a very clear trend in BOTH the rural Northeast AND rural Midwest to shift pretty significantly overall to voting Republican that actually was not as prevalent in the South (since most areas vote very Republican already), so I would surmise that, for whatever reason that can be speculated, there's at least a common political resonance in both regions that at least Donald Trump was able to tap into: Donald Trump: See a Map That Shows How He Won | Time.com
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Old 06-02-2017, 07:25 AM
 
15,489 posts, read 7,908,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meemur View Post
I hate to generalize. I've lived full-time in Michigan, Ohio, and Iowa and spent some time (less than 3 months) in Tampa, Raleigh, and Atlanta.

I made myself fit in to some extent because I was on my best behavior in terms of manners, patience, and not saying, "Back in ___, we did it that way." I took everything in stride, especially the S-L-O-W pace.

At the back of my mind, I knew that I was an outsider, so I tried my best to be a really good guest. In turn, people were nice to me, and I got a lot of dinner invitations.

On the other hand, they thought I was too slow and friendly in New York. I stuck out, country-bumpkin style: my dress-up clothes were their "at home" wear. I was "too nice" when I used normal manners.

All and all, I was glad to get home. I whine about the winters here, but each time I spend time out of the area, I'm always glad to get back.
My experience has been similar.

I've lived in the south but am from the Great Lakes region (NW OH and SE MI).

I personally think Midwestern hospitality is "better" than southern hospitality in that we are more honest and forthright than southerners. I always say that southern hospitality is lying is a nice way to your face. I prefer the truth and if it is a disappointing truth to just have someone say sorry or offer an alternative solution - this is what normally happens in Ohio where I currently live.

On the northeast, I don't think they are as friendly as people in the Midwest. I do think that southerners are friendly but I just learned from living in the south that it is sometimes a mask from them so I am likely to not take them and their friendliness as seriously. I've stayed for long visits in the NE and I enjoyed my time in various states there (CT and NY in particular). But I felt that people in the NE just aren't as openly friendly. It takes them a while to open up. I have a cousin in CT and she is looking into moving back to the Midwest because she said its hard to make friends there. I lived in GA for over a decade and felt the same thing about metro Atlanta - that it is hard to make friends.

So I don't think that either the south or northeast is better for fitting in for a Midwesterner. I think we Midwesterners (especially those from the Great Lakes) we can get along with practically anyone and can adapt to either locale. But all of the people I knew from the Great Lakes who lived in the south or the northeast, they prefer the culture of their home states/cities for the most part.

I moved back to Ohio after being away for 20 years. I love being back. People are friendly and down to earth and I don't get lied to as much. I also get into conversations with random strangers and we hit it off and become friendly associates easier.
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Old 06-02-2017, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
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This fully depends on where in the Midwest you're talking about.

The Upper Midwest is vastly different from the Lower Midwest. States like Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota were settled by Puritan New Englanders. They were culturally distinct from the settlers from Greater Appalachia, who settled most of the Lower Midwest and had more culturally in common with settlers in the South. They held different values, different governments. While most of the Midwest is quite conservative, the Upper Midwestern states are, at their hearts, liberal states - (this recent election was an anomaly if you look back at the last 30 years. There are reasons for this, but this is not the place to derail down that road.) The typically liberal leanings of the Upper Midwest is due to its New England influence/settlement, which has only been moderated by an influx of Southern and Appalachian immigration over the course of the last century, but overall the three Upper Midwestern states are still very much extensions of the "Yankeedom" region of the Northeast, which is a stark contrast to the rest of the Midwest. That is its roots. There's a great book about this called "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America", if you're interested in this and the cultural differences between regions of the United States.

All of this is a big reason why Michigan and Ohio hate each other. Despite similar economies and similar challenges, they are very much at odds when it comes to the core ethics and values of their residents. Also, football, but that's really just an extension of the already existing rivalry that extended back to before the Toledo War.

So does a Midwesterner fit bitter in the Northeast or the South? Well, that depends. Are they from the Upper Midwest or the Lower Midwest?
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Old 06-02-2017, 09:39 AM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,146 posts, read 1,528,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post
I have a cousin in CT and she is looking into moving back to the Midwest because she said its hard to make friends there. I lived in GA for over a decade and felt the same thing about metro Atlanta - that it is hard to make friends.
Woah, it's hard to make friends in Atlanta? Seems pretty easy to me.
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Old 06-02-2017, 09:44 AM
 
29,955 posts, read 27,459,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
Woah, it's hard to make friends in Atlanta? Seems pretty easy to me.
It was easy for me as well but I think it depends on a lot of things: where you live in "Atlanta," your networks and how much you tap into them (e.g., alumni associations, civic organizations, religious organizations, BGLO's, etc.), the type of job you have and where you work, your age, etc. I think this is pretty much the case for most cities really.
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Old 06-02-2017, 11:44 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
This fully depends on where in the Midwest you're talking about.

The Upper Midwest is vastly different from the Lower Midwest. States like Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota were settled by Puritan New Englanders. They were culturally distinct from the settlers from Greater Appalachia, who settled most of the Lower Midwest and had more culturally in common with settlers in the South. They held different values, different governments. While most of the Midwest is quite conservative, the Upper Midwestern states are, at their hearts, liberal states - (this recent election was an anomaly if you look back at the last 30 years. There are reasons for this, but this is not the place to derail down that road.) The typically liberal leanings of the Upper Midwest is due to its New England influence/settlement, which has only been moderated by an influx of Southern and Appalachian immigration over the course of the last century, but overall the three Upper Midwestern states are still very much extensions of the "Yankeedom" region of the Northeast, which is a stark contrast to the rest of the Midwest. That is its roots. There's a great book about this called "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America", if you're interested in this and the cultural differences between regions of the United States.

All of this is a big reason why Michigan and Ohio hate each other. Despite similar economies and similar challenges, they are very much at odds when it comes to the core ethics and values of their residents. Also, football, but that's really just an extension of the already existing rivalry that extended back to before the Toledo War.

So does a Midwesterner fit bitter in the Northeast or the South? Well, that depends. Are they from the Upper Midwest or the Lower Midwest?
Ok, everything you say is true, but the Lower Northeast also extends culturally into the Midwest with the Midlands culture created by Quaker types of the Mid Atlantic.

I think Ohio people can be just fine in Pennsylvania. When you get to Missouri however the South begins to extend upward much more than East of the Mississippi. So they would fit more in the South.

I have met people from Missouri who still Kentucky a culture shock however.
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