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View Poll Results: The average Midwesterner fits better in
The Northeast 56 40.58%
The South 82 59.42%
Voters: 138. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-05-2017, 11:01 PM
 
305 posts, read 238,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post
The south since midwesterners are Donald Trump people.
The Donald Trump born and raised in Queens New York City. That Donald you mean.
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Old 06-05-2017, 11:47 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,995 posts, read 2,152,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Also it seems like people miss the fact that Midwesterners would immediately stand out as being not local in the South. No Northeastern native would honestly notice a Midwestern person as a non local unless they asked.

It's not as if Midwesterners act, think, or talk Southern as a whole.

Also, someone keeps bringing up Black people. But, even if we just use Whites as an example, Midwestern Whites are a lot more like Northeastern ones even down to their appearance. You don't see tons of European diversity in the South like you do up North. Some Illinois or Michigan Polish or Italian person wouldn't even *look* like most Southern Whites.
Are you saying that you can tell simply by looking at a white person if he or she is from the Midwest or the South? I'd like to see that.

The Southern 2/3rds of the lower Midwest looks, feels and sounds alot more like the Upper South than the Northeast and New England. Whenever I hear people from New England and Maine talking on television, I almost always have to turn on the closed caption to understand what they are saying. Especially Boston. I once worked with a girl from Boston and I couldnt understand alot of what she would be saying. I was always having to ask her to repeat her self.

Indianapolis, Dayton, and Cincinatti are more like Louisville, St Louis, Nashville, Baltimore than Boston, Hartford, Ct, Newark, NJ, New York City.

Smaller towns like Muncie, Ind and Anderson, Ind have more in common with Bowling Green, Kentucky and Huntington, West Virginia than Danbury, CT, Portland, Maine or Duluth Minnesota.

Last edited by Ivory Lee Spurlock; 06-05-2017 at 11:56 PM..
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Old 06-06-2017, 02:36 AM
 
305 posts, read 238,588 times
Reputation: 434
Looks like your poll isn't going so well for ya Eddie. Lets hope your next one goes a little better.
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Old 06-06-2017, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,448 posts, read 11,951,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Are you saying that you can tell simply by looking at a white person if he or she is from the Midwest or the South? I'd like to see that.

The Southern 2/3rds of the lower Midwest looks, feels and sounds alot more like the Upper South than the Northeast and New England. Whenever I hear people from New England and Maine talking on television, I almost always have to turn on the closed caption to understand what they are saying. Especially Boston. I once worked with a girl from Boston and I couldnt understand alot of what she would be saying. I was always having to ask her to repeat her self.

Indianapolis, Dayton, and Cincinatti are more like Louisville, St Louis, Nashville, Baltimore than Boston, Hartford, Ct, Newark, NJ, New York City.

Smaller towns like Muncie, Ind and Anderson, Ind have more in common with Bowling Green, Kentucky and Huntington, West Virginia than Danbury, CT, Portland, Maine or Duluth Minnesota.

While I agree with most of what you say here, the one issue I have with it is every example you give of a place in the Northeast is in New England, New York, or the northern half of New Jersey. Southern New Jersey and most of Pennsylvania (with the exception of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area and Erie) are culturally part of the same "Midland" zone where north and South blend together. I've met people in the outlying counties here in Western Pennsylvania who have a "twang" to their voice for example. And if you include Delaware and Maryland in the Northeast (as most do these days) they certainly have southern influence.
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Old 06-06-2017, 08:55 AM
 
774 posts, read 1,698,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
While I agree with most of what you say here, the one issue I have with it is every example you give of a place in the Northeast is in New England, New York, or the northern half of New Jersey. Southern New Jersey and most of Pennsylvania (with the exception of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area and Erie) are culturally part of the same "Midland" zone where north and South blend together. I've met people in the outlying counties here in Western Pennsylvania who have a "twang" to their voice for example. And if you include Delaware and Maryland in the Northeast (as most do these days) they certainly have southern influence.

Believe it or not, there's some Southern influence in NYC and surrounding areas.
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Old 06-06-2017, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,282 posts, read 2,531,490 times
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I would never speak for the people in an entire region but this Midwesterner would prefer New England. For a variety of reasons.
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Old 06-06-2017, 11:56 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,856,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Are you saying that you can tell simply by looking at a white person if he or she is from the Midwest or the South? I'd like to see that.

The Southern 2/3rds of the lower Midwest looks, feels and sounds alot more like the Upper South than the Northeast and New England. Whenever I hear people from New England and Maine talking on television, I almost always have to turn on the closed caption to understand what they are saying. Especially Boston. I once worked with a girl from Boston and I couldnt understand alot of what she would be saying. I was always having to ask her to repeat her self.

Indianapolis, Dayton, and Cincinatti are more like Louisville, St Louis, Nashville, Baltimore than Boston, Hartford, Ct, Newark, NJ, New York City.

Smaller towns like Muncie, Ind and Anderson, Ind have more in common with Bowling Green, Kentucky and Huntington, West Virginia than Danbury, CT, Portland, Maine or Duluth Minnesota.
St. Louis isn't a Southern city...

Also, what about the lower Northeast? Why do people conveniently forget that part of the country? Very convenient!

Last edited by EddieOlSkool; 06-06-2017 at 12:05 PM..
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Old 06-06-2017, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,448 posts, read 11,951,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
St. Louis isn't a Southern city...

Also, what about the lower Northeast? Why do people conveniently forget that part of the country? Very convenient!
I've noticed there's this weird trend now (I think related to the movement of the term "mid-Atlantic" to be centered around the DMV) to think if an area is Mid-Atlantic it's neither part of the Northeast or South. At its most extreme version, this results in people just calling New England and New York the Northeast, and not including PA/NJ in the Northeast at all. Maybe he was doing that?
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Old 06-06-2017, 12:52 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,749 posts, read 6,160,499 times
Reputation: 3601
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Pick someone who would demographically fit within the average of a person in their region and the point of it is that individual people aren't the discussion here.
What do you mean "demographically fit within the average of a person in their region?" I've given examples already.
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Old 06-06-2017, 12:57 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,749 posts, read 6,160,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I've noticed there's this weird trend now (I think related to the movement of the term "mid-Atlantic" to be centered around the DMV) to think if an area is Mid-Atlantic it's neither part of the Northeast or South. At its most extreme version, this results in people just calling New England and New York the Northeast, and not including PA/NJ in the Northeast at all. Maybe he was doing that?
I don't know about the DMV, but Baltimore is a Mid-Atlantic/southern. The DMV could better explain that
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