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View Poll Results: The average Midwesterner fits better in
The Northeast 56 40.58%
The South 82 59.42%
Voters: 138. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-06-2017, 01:29 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
St. Louis isn't a Southern city...

Also, what about the lower Northeast? Why do people conveniently forget that part of the country? Very convenient!
I've never heard anybody use the term "Lower Northeast", whereas, I have heard the term "Lower Midwest" and "Upper South" since probably 1965 when I was in 5th grade and we learned about each state and region. There's millions of people from the Upper South that settled in the mid sized and small factory towns of the Lower Midwest. When I was in school, there was lots of kids whose families came from Tennessee and Kentucky. There were very few kids whose family came from the Northeast, and if they did come from the Northeast, they usually had something to do with Ball State. Seems like about 75% of the White people I ever came across in Muncie came from either East Central Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, and to some extent, Western Pennsylvania. Not too many from Illinois, the Northeast or anywhere on the East Coast, .
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Old 06-06-2017, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Seems like about 75% of the White people I ever came across in Muncie came from either East Central Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, and to some extent, Western Pennsylvania. Not too many from Illinois, the Northeast or anywhere on the East Coast, .
Uhh...this is part of the Northeast dude.
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Old 06-06-2017, 02:48 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Uhh...this is part of the Northeast dude.
Technically it is, I suppose, but I don't know what the point is you're trying to make. The reality is that a good chunk of Western Pennsylvania is merely an extension of West Virginia. It's more like the Upper South or the Lower Midwest than it is the Northeast. I think it's fair statement to say that Pittsburgh is more of a big version of Charleston, WV than it is a Little Philadelphia. I never ran across anybody from Philadelphia in Muncie, but I knew a few who came from Western Pennsylvania. Not many, but they were there.
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Old 06-06-2017, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Uhh...this is part of the Northeast dude.
Western Pennsylvania is Midwestern more than Northeastern. I used to spend a lot of time in Erie, Warren, Cranberry, Meadville and even most of the locals consider themselves more akin to the Midwest. But yes, technically it is in the Northeast, like Delaware is technically in the South but really isn't Southern.

Western PA is one area where a Midwesterner may actually fit in within the "Northeast".
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Old 06-06-2017, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
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I actually agree with the poll's direction at the moment. Midwestern cities seem to be a bit more similar to southeastern ones than northeastern ones.

New York skews this pretty heavily. Living in New York City is like living on a different planet compared to any other city in the country--including Chicago.
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Old 06-06-2017, 04:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vatnos View Post
I actually agree with the poll's direction at the moment. Midwestern cities seem to be a bit more similar to southeastern ones than northeastern ones.

New York skews this pretty heavily. Living in New York City is like living on a different planet compared to any other city in the country--including Chicago.
By your reasoning, this would, then, hold true for all parts of the country...not just those from the Midwest.
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Old 06-06-2017, 08:50 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Indianapolis, Dayton, and Cincinatti are more like Louisville, St Louis, Nashville, Baltimore than Boston, Hartford, Ct, Newark, NJ, New York City.
Just a heads up, but St. Louisans aren't going to feel a cultural kinship with any of those Southern cities or Baltimore. Chicago is the city that's most frequently mentioned. Maybe it's because St. Louis lost its most important city in the Midwest crown to Chicago way back in day or due to the Cards/Cubs rivalry, but Chicago remains the city St. Louisans both love and love to hate. Interestingly enough, St. Louis is also the only city outside of the Great Lakes region going through the Northern Cities Vowel Shift in regards to its accent, and it's chalked up to its connection to Chicago. That being said, St. Louis is also an island. Accents and culture change pretty quickly once you get away from the core of metro St. Louis in any direction though.
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Old 06-07-2017, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Technically it is, I suppose, but I don't know what the point is you're trying to make. The reality is that a good chunk of Western Pennsylvania is merely an extension of West Virginia. It's more like the Upper South or the Lower Midwest than it is the Northeast. I think it's fair statement to say that Pittsburgh is more of a big version of Charleston, WV than it is a Little Philadelphia. I never ran across anybody from Philadelphia in Muncie, but I knew a few who came from Western Pennsylvania. Not many, but they were there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by KY_Transplant View Post
Western Pennsylvania is Midwestern more than Northeastern. I used to spend a lot of time in Erie, Warren, Cranberry, Meadville and even most of the locals consider themselves more akin to the Midwest. But yes, technically it is in the Northeast, like Delaware is technically in the South but really isn't Southern.

Western PA is one area where a Midwesterner may actually fit in within the "Northeast".
I'll just say that as a transplant to here (Philly born, New England raised) locals get extremely upset if you tell them Pittsburgh is part of the Midwest.

Regardless, the point I was trying to make was the same one as upthread. A lot of the people arguing that the Northeast is culturally distinct from the Midwest (or part of it) are really only looking at certain subsections of the Northeast, and discounting other areas entirely. Both the Northeast and the Midwest are big diverse regions. Although the "average culture" in them differs a bit, the spectrum of culture is basically 100% overlap. New England culture blends into Upstate NY and the Great Lakes. Midland culture starts in Pennsylvania and spreads westward into the lower Midwest.

The rural Lower Midwest is absolutely southern influenced though. I grew up in New England, and to my ear, even people in rural counties north of Columbus have a bit of a twang. Still, the OP was asking about the average Midwesterner, and people who live in rural parts of the Lower Midwest are certainly not the majority of the Midwest's population.
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Old 06-07-2017, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
425 posts, read 294,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I'll just say that as a transplant to here (Philly born, New England raised) locals get extremely upset if you tell them Pittsburgh is part of the Midwest.

Regardless, the point I was trying to make was the same one as upthread. A lot of the people arguing that the Northeast is culturally distinct from the Midwest (or part of it) are really only looking at certain subsections of the Northeast, and discounting other areas entirely. Both the Northeast and the Midwest are big diverse regions. Although the "average culture" in them differs a bit, the spectrum of culture is basically 100% overlap. New England culture blends into Upstate NY and the Great Lakes. Midland culture starts in Pennsylvania and spreads westward into the lower Midwest.

The rural Lower Midwest is absolutely southern influenced though. I grew up in New England, and to my ear, even people in rural counties north of Columbus have a bit of a twang. Still, the OP was asking about the average Midwesterner, and people who live in rural parts of the Lower Midwest are certainly not the majority of the Midwest's population.
Yes, I agree with you about the Lower Midwest being Southern influenced. Going South on I-71 I can hear the twang pick up in people's voices right around Columbus, Ohio especially South of the city near Grove City, OH. I think that the average Lower Midwesterner would adjust well to the South, but the Midwest is diverse and that is only one sub-section of a large region. People from Michigan, Northern Indiana, Northern Ohio, most of Illinois, Wisconsin, and Iowa, would probably not adjust to the South well at all, broadly speaking.
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Old 06-07-2017, 04:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Are you saying that you can tell simply by looking at a white person if he or she is from the Midwest or the South? I'd like to see that.

The Southern 2/3rds of the lower Midwest looks, feels and sounds alot more like the Upper South than the Northeast and New England. Whenever I hear people from New England and Maine talking on television, I almost always have to turn on the closed caption to understand what they are saying. Especially Boston. I once worked with a girl from Boston and I couldnt understand alot of what she would be saying. I was always having to ask her to repeat her self.

Indianapolis, Dayton, and Cincinatti are more like Louisville, St Louis, Nashville, Baltimore than Boston, Hartford, Ct, Newark, NJ, New York City.

Smaller towns like Muncie, Ind and Anderson, Ind have more in common with Bowling Green, Kentucky and Huntington, West Virginia than Danbury, CT, Portland, Maine or Duluth Minnesota.
I'm originally from Indy and I don't identify with Louisville, St. Louis or Nashville. I have personally have nothing against the South but I feel at home living the Mid Atlantic region of the country.
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