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View Poll Results: The average Midwesterner fits better in
The Northeast 56 40.58%
The South 82 59.42%
Voters: 138. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-08-2017, 11:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I've never heard anybody use the term "Lower Northeast", whereas, I have heard the term "Lower Midwest" and "Upper South" since probably 1965 when I was in 5th grade and we learned about each state and region. There's millions of people from the Upper South that settled in the mid sized and small factory towns of the Lower Midwest. When I was in school, there was lots of kids whose families came from Tennessee and Kentucky. There were very few kids whose family came from the Northeast, and if they did come from the Northeast, they usually had something to do with Ball State. Seems like about 75% of the White people I ever came across in Muncie came from either East Central Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, and to some extent, Western Pennsylvania. Not too many from Illinois, the Northeast or anywhere on the East Coast, .
You bring up Southern settlers and you seem to forget that it was people from the Northeast who created the Midwest and its culture; NOT the South.

This is true of places like Cincinnati which have a very Mid Atlantic feel despite being 100% Midwestern and maybe marginally Southern in the burbs (Miami Valley area).

And it doesn't matter whether the Lower Northeast is a thing or not. The truth is that someone from South Jersey is vastly different than a New Yorker or even Northeast Jersey native the same way someone from Cincinnati is different than a Clevelander.

And can we not move goalposts please? Becsudr if we are starting to admit that Midwesterners can fit in the Western part of the Northeast (Inland North), then essentially this is proving that once again, the South isn't the welcoming "2nd Midwest" or "original Midwest" people here are trying to make it out to be.
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Old 06-08-2017, 02:39 PM
 
992 posts, read 940,735 times
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I think it's going to do more with political leanings than anything else
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Old 06-10-2017, 07:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I was raised in the upper Midwest, live in the south and have traveled extensively. I am convinced most Midwest people would adapt better to southern culture rather than northeast culture. Northeastern people are very fast paced, aggressive and down to business. The polite small talk you find a lot of in the south and a fair bit in the Midwest would be considered intrusive and unwanted in the northeast. Also social values lean to the right a bit in most Midwest places, even states that vote blue. The extreme progressive positions commonly held in New York would be alien states like Wisconsin or Ohio. It's a much smaller gap between the values of the Midwest and those of the northeast. Even urban Midwest people from Chicago or Detroit are not really like thier counterparts in New York and Boston, they are STILL midwestern. I'm going with the south on this one.
The average Southerner (esp. Outside DFW/Atlanta/Miami) is likely to say about the urban Midwest what you're saying about the Northeast. Contrary to popular belief, FAR more Midwesterners live in places that resemble and feel like Uptown Chicago than places that look and feel like rural Iowa. Urbanity is the norm in the Midwest, NOT the exception.

The urban Midwest, while hardly NYC/Philly/DC/Boston is still more fast paced and aggressive compared to much of the south, urban or rural. Even the big metros down South don't feel particularly fast paced or aggressive compared to the urban midwest. Despite the population differences, I don't find that Dallas, Fort Worth, Atlanta, or, especially, Houston to be more fast paced than KC, STL, Detroit, or MSP. The South still moves slow compared to the NE and Midwest.

I'll say the South gets to hear MUCH cooler non commercial/underground music before much of the rest of the country, however. The South, and their radio stations, in particular, is/are better with promoting local talent
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Old 06-10-2017, 08:47 AM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,144 posts, read 1,524,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2000_Watts View Post
The average Southerner (esp. Outside DFW/Atlanta/Miami) is likely to say about the urban Midwest what you're saying about the Northeast. Contrary to popular belief, FAR more Midwesterners live in places that resemble and feel like Uptown Chicago than places that look and feel like rural Iowa. Urbanity is the norm in the Midwest, NOT the exception.

The urban Midwest, while hardly NYC/Philly/DC/Boston is still more fast paced and aggressive compared to much of the south, urban or rural. Even the big metros down South don't feel particularly fast paced or aggressive compared to the urban midwest. Despite the population differences, I don't find that Dallas, Fort Worth, Atlanta, or, especially, Houston to be more fast paced than KC, STL, Detroit, or MSP. The South still moves slow compared to the NE and Midwest.
I disagree, have you actually been to Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Miami, and etc? The Broad Southern Metro Areas make those Southern cities feel way more vibrant and faster paced than KC, STL, Detroit, Cleveland and etc. having a lot of Commercial Growth, Housing, Activities, Venues, etc. Metro Miami is extensive beyond just Miami; you have Miami Beach, Boca Raton, Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Sunrise, Coconut Creek, and etc. that's always pumping and flowing. Same for Atlanta and Decatur, Sandy Springs, and Marietta, Dallas with Forth Worth, Arlington, and Irving, or Houston with Sugar Land, Galveston, The Woodlands and etc.

From the nightlife, to the activities, to the transportation, Southern Metros feel very busy compared to the stereotypes. And this is coming from a New Yorker...
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Old 06-10-2017, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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I think a lot of the Midwest has a lot more in common with the inter mountain west than it does with the south (culturally and socially). The western half of the Midwest is more like the west, the eastern half of the Midwest is more like the northeast. Southern Missouri, southern Illinois and southern Indiana are more like the south. For the most part though, the Midwest is the Midwest and is too heterogeneous to be lumped in with any one thing.

People in this forum try to frame threads and their arguments as sweeping generalizations but reality is more nuanced.
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Old 06-10-2017, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,629,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
I disagree, have you actually been to Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Miami, and etc? The Broad Southern Metro Areas make those Southern cities feel way more vibrant and faster paced than KC, STL, Detroit, Cleveland and etc. having a lot of Commercial Growth, Housing, Activities, Venues, etc. Metro Miami is extensive beyond just Miami; you have Miami Beach, Boca Raton, Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Sunrise, Coconut Creek, and etc. that's always pumping and flowing. Same for Atlanta and Decatur, Sandy Springs, and Marietta, Dallas with Forth Worth, Arlington, and Irving, or Houston with Sugar Land, Galveston, The Woodlands and etc.

From the nightlife, to the activities, to the transportation, Southern Metros feel very busy compared to the stereotypes. And this is coming from a New Yorker...
I agree, the Southern metros feel more vibrant than the Midwest metros. I live in Tampa and I'm from St. Louis. The metros are similar in size, but Tampa feels way more busy. Even though St. Louis has way more traditional urbanism, Tampa is constantly building and growing. People are not scared to go to other parts of town and on an average day you just see more general activity.
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Old 06-16-2017, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,299 posts, read 3,517,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newengland17 View Post
Don't know how the south got ANY votes in this poll, it's just pure delusion.
You've got the delusional part backwards, look in the mirror.

Quote:
Especially when the East side of the Midwest is basically an extension of the East coast anyway.
LOL!! Okay.

Quote:
Southern culture and cities are totally different. Without a doubt, most Midwesterners would feel much more at home in the Northeast.
I guess that's why literally millions of Midwesterners have moved to the South over the last couple of decades, and continue to do so. They aren't moving to the Northeast.
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Old 06-17-2017, 08:36 AM
 
Location: DFW
6,800 posts, read 11,782,480 times
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West Coast

First impressions are everything, and if you talk like the locals, you have a better chance of blending in.
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Old 06-17-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,825 posts, read 12,338,063 times
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People in the Upper Midwest would fit in better in the Northeast and people from the Lower Midwest would fit in better in the South. Its my contention that someone from rural Missouri or rural Kansas would fit in better in a Southern city compared to a rural Northeast area. I find the Northeast to be less easygoing and friendly than the South even in the rural areas. While its true Southern hospitality has declined significantly in the major cities, they are still friendlier and less rude than the Northeast.

Michigan and Ohio have a Rust Belt feel very similar to much of Pennsylvania and Upstate New York. The Upper Midwest cities like Detroit, Chicago, Cleveland, Toledo, etc all feel like Northeastern industrial cities like Newark, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, etc. The only Midwest city I've been to that stands out would be Columbus as that area's density and developmental patterns and physical layout has a somewhat Sunbelt feel to it. I found Columbus to be a more "suburban" city kind of like Charlotte or Raleigh.
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Old 06-17-2017, 09:51 AM
 
Location: mo county md
568 posts, read 330,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post


I guess that's why literally millions of Midwesterners have moved to the South over the last couple of decades, and continue to do so. They aren't moving to the Northeast.
This. People leaving Chicago definitely aren't going to the Northeast, at least not the ones constantly complaining about how expensive this area is.
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