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View Poll Results: The average Midwesterner fits better in
The Northeast 56 40.58%
The South 82 59.42%
Voters: 138. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-17-2017, 10:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA All Day View Post
This. People leaving Chicago definitely aren't going to the Northeast, at least not the ones constantly complaining about how expensive this area is.
Ok. People from the Northeast tend to be moving to the South more than the Midwest as well so I am jot really sure if that has anything to do with culture or opportunity. The Sunbelt is on the up and up. People from Chicago leave the Midwest for the South to get better jobs, not to fit in better amongst locals.
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Old 06-17-2017, 10:50 AM
 
Location: mo county md
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Ok. People from the Northeast tend to be moving to the South more than the Midwest as well so I am jot really sure if that has anything to do with culture or opportunity. The Sunbelt is on the up and up. People from Chicago leave the Midwest for the South to get better jobs, not to fit in better amongst locals.
To that end...what's the response in the Chicago forum (or virtually any online comments section for a Chi publication) anytime NY is even mentioned? Doesn't suggest to me that people leaving here would even want to "fit in" in the Northeast.
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Old 06-17-2017, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,421 posts, read 11,926,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA All Day View Post
To that end...what's the response in the Chicago forum (or virtually any online comments section for a Chi publication) anytime NY is even mentioned? Doesn't suggest to me that people leaving here would even want to "fit in" in the Northeast.
Why?

If you move to another part of the country, it's likely because you don't like some aspect of where you're from, whether it be high taxes, cold winters, or a cruddy job market. So of course you'd be more apt to move somewhere different than somewhere which was very similar.
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Old 06-17-2017, 11:04 AM
 
Location: mo county md
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Why?

If you move to another part of the country, it's likely because you don't like some aspect of where you're from, whether it be high taxes, cold winters, or a cruddy job market. So of course you'd be more apt to move somewhere different than somewhere which was very similar.
Except Chi and NY aren't all that similar, aside from both being large, older American cities.
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Old 06-17-2017, 11:57 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,845,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA All Day View Post
To that end...what's the response in the Chicago forum (or virtually any online comments section for a Chi publication) anytime NY is even mentioned? Doesn't suggest to me that people leaving here would even want to "fit in" in the Northeast.
And NY is representative of all the Northeast now?
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Old 06-17-2017, 12:31 PM
 
Location: mo county md
567 posts, read 329,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
And NY is representative of all the Northeast now?
Fair point, but when I think about factors people generally associate with the Northeast, the types of people that are leaving here generally don't want a place like that. Jobs aren't the only reason they're going south or southwest.
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Old 06-17-2017, 03:22 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,845,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA All Day View Post
Fair point, but when I think about factors people generally associate with the Northeast, the types of people that are leaving here generally don't want a place like that. Jobs aren't the only reason they're going south or southwest.
But if people from the Northeast are doing the same, then I think the sunbelt just attracts people from everywhere especially since opportunity trumps culture in most moving decisions. And generally, the type of Northerner who moves South anyway is the type to not like where they live for multiple reasons. The South and Southwest seem to just attract more people than the North and that isn't really factoring anything that this thread means to discuss because all types of Northerners are going there not just Midwesterners. So it doesn't really address the main question and just seeks to change the topic.
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Old 06-17-2017, 03:33 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,480 posts, read 2,225,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA All Day View Post
This. People leaving Chicago definitely aren't going to the Northeast, at least not the ones constantly complaining about how expensive this area is.
Crain's did a piece a couple of years back looking at Census data from 2009 to 2013 to figure out where metro Chicagoans were going.

1. Champaign-Urbana (7,355)
2. Phoenix (7,251)
3. New York (6,435)
4. Milwaukee (6,410)
5. Los Angeles (5,554)
6. Atlanta (5,275)
7. Indianapolis (5,260)
8. Houston (5,252)
9. Bloomington, Illinois (5,092)
10. St. Louis (5,029)

I'd bet money that most people going to Champaign and Bloomington are students, but still an interesting list. Here's a link to the NBC 5 article on it since the Crain's article is behind a paywall.
Where Chicagoans Are Most Likely to Move When They Leave the Windy City | NBC Chicago

The report also looked at transplants to Chicagoland from 2009 to 2013. This was the breakdown:

1. New York (7,385)
2. Atlanta (4,582)
3. Los Angeles (4,316)
4. St. Louis (3,925)
5. Phoenix (3,890)
6. Minneapolis (3,738)
7. Detroit (3,648)
8. Champaign-Urbana (3,635)
9. Indianapolis (3,600)
10. Milwaukee (3,533)

Last edited by PerseusVeil; 06-17-2017 at 03:49 PM..
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Old 06-19-2017, 04:39 PM
 
212 posts, read 172,610 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
I disagree, have you actually been to Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Miami, and etc? The Broad Southern Metro Areas make those Southern cities feel way more vibrant and faster paced than KC, STL, Detroit, Cleveland and etc. having a lot of Commercial Growth, Housing, Activities, Venues, etc. Metro Miami is extensive beyond just Miami; you have Miami Beach, Boca Raton, Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Sunrise, Coconut Creek, and etc. that's always pumping and flowing. Same for Atlanta and Decatur, Sandy Springs, and Marietta, Dallas with Forth Worth, Arlington, and Irving, or Houston with Sugar Land, Galveston, The Woodlands and etc.

From the nightlife, to the activities, to the transportation, Southern Metros feel very busy compared to the stereotypes. And this is coming from a New Yorker...

I've Been to Atlanta, Dallas, and Houston multiple times and have close friends who were born and raised in all three. Bigger doesn't mean faster paced. Do those cities feel bigger and busier? Yes. I didn't notice, however, any significant change of pace when going to either city despite their respective sizes. People from ATL/DFW/HOU definitely don't speak or conduct business any faster or more aggressively than those from KC/STL/DET/MSP.
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Old 06-19-2017, 04:41 PM
 
212 posts, read 172,610 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
I disagree, have you actually been to Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Miami, and etc? The Broad Southern Metro Areas make those Southern cities feel way more vibrant and faster paced than KC, STL, Detroit, Cleveland and etc. having a lot of Commercial Growth, Housing, Activities, Venues, etc. Metro Miami is extensive beyond just Miami; you have Miami Beach, Boca Raton, Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Sunrise, Coconut Creek, and etc. that's always pumping and flowing. Same for Atlanta and Decatur, Sandy Springs, and Marietta, Dallas with Forth Worth, Arlington, and Irving, or Houston with Sugar Land, Galveston, The Woodlands and etc.

From the nightlife, to the activities, to the transportation, Southern Metros feel very busy compared to the stereotypes. And this is coming from a New Yorker...
Most of metropolitan DFW/Atlanta/Houston feel like never-ending versions of Johnson County, KS/Du Page/NW Cook County, IL suburbia. Not what I would equate with fast-paced
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