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View Poll Results: The average Midwesterner fits better in
The Northeast 56 40.58%
The South 82 59.42%
Voters: 138. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-21-2017, 03:09 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
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I would say it depends on where in the Midwest. The region has some of the greatest urban/rural cultural divides in the country. I think people from the classic urban cities in the Midwest like Chicago, Milwaukee, Twin Cities, Cleveland, etc have more culturally in common with people from the Northeast. The rural Midwest would lean towards the South. The second-tier Midwestern cities like Indianapolis, Columbus, Kansas City, etc probably lean Northeast but not near as strong as the major cities.
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Old 05-21-2017, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Terramaria
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For most of their history, the Northeast, but since the 1970s, the gap has definitely been narrowing as the region gradually turns politically redder and parts of the South turn more progressive to the point that at the present its the Northeast by a VERY slight margin, mostly due to weather, urban layout, jobs, certain demographics, education, and arts/cultural life. The COL in the Midwest has gradually fallen relative to the rest of the US while in the Northeast it has risen while in the South it has risen to the point where it is similar to the Midwest in terms of affordability, and also that with the continued removal of most Confederate references, the region is starting to feel more "Typical American" than the more international-feeling Northeast. Let's not forget Dallas, Austin, Houston, the large Florida cities, and Raleigh for its growing cosmopolitan and sophisticated lifestyles. Religion in most large Southern cities is also not nearly as important as it was a generation ago, and let's not forget that the typical Southern accent is becoming less common in those aforementioned cities. You'll also find that much of American manufacturing has moved to the South as opposed to the NE/West, and that was the key driver of classic Midwestern industry as opposed to service-oriented economies, and both the Midwest and South are the most important agricultural regions. Let's also not forget that the "Auto belt" that begins in MI and IN extends down through KY, TN, and ends in MS/AL.
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Old 05-22-2017, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
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I've lived in the Northeast and South. In the Northeast, I felt right at home. In the South, I didn't fit in. The pace was way too slow for me and inefficient. I didn't understand the etiquette nuances or the religious fervor in the areas I lived in. I'm pretty straightforward and I guess liberal-minded compared to my southern neighbors, though feel conservative up north. I still own property in the south but do have a hard time relating to the neighbors. I relate far better to family/friends in Canada and the Northeast than to those in the South, which feels foreign to me.

Last edited by GoCUBS1; 05-22-2017 at 07:48 AM..
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Old 05-22-2017, 10:39 AM
 
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Depends where they're from. People from Chicago would likely feel more "at home" in the NE. Same is likely true for people from metro Detroit, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, and Cleveland. Everyone else would probably feel more at ease in the south.
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Old 05-22-2017, 02:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I feel the answer is the Northeast for one reason: No matter what part of the Midwest you're from - upper or lower, rural or urban, there's a culturally analogous part of the Northeast. The same can't be said for the South.
Yes exactly. Because even people from Cincinnati wouldn't feel terribly out of place in Pittsburgh or Philly, and neither would rural Southern Ohio types feel very out of place in rural PA or Jersey.

Southern Indiana people could be at home in some parts of Delaware even.
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Old 05-22-2017, 03:01 PM
 
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There are rural Northeast regions that have their Midwestern counterpart. There isn't an urban rural divide that should place rural Midwestern people in the South. New York state and Pennsylvania and even parts of New England have their similar feel to the rural Midwest.

For example rural Michigan is a lot more like rural Upstate New York than it is like rural Virginia or North Carolina. Heck, there is only one state separating Kentucky from Michigan and rural Kentucky has little to nothing in common with rural Michigan.

I still go Northeast. It's not as if when you're in the rural Midwest that you're in an equivalent to anything Southern. I challenge anyone to prove otherwise.
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Old 05-22-2017, 09:06 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
There are rural Northeast regions that have their Midwestern counterpart. There isn't an urban rural divide that should place rural Midwestern people in the South. New York state and Pennsylvania and even parts of New England have their similar feel to the rural Midwest.

For example rural Michigan is a lot more like rural Upstate New York than it is like rural Virginia or North Carolina. Heck, there is only one state separating Kentucky from Michigan and rural Kentucky has little to nothing in common with rural Michigan.

I still go Northeast. It's not as if when you're in the rural Midwest that you're in an equivalent to anything Southern. I challenge anyone to prove otherwise.
Again, you can't prove opinions. I'm from rural southwest MI and I fit in just fine in the south. Some parts are a better fit than others than others but other than trying to understand really thick Louisiana accents I've never felt like I landed in some foreign territory. Northeast TN actually reminds me a lot of where I grew up, with less sand and taller hills, it's one of the reasons I decided to move here.
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Old 05-22-2017, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I still go Northeast. It's not as if when you're in the rural Midwest that you're in an equivalent to anything Southern. I challenge anyone to prove otherwise.
Check out the population stats from the Census. Midwesterners are moving to the South in droves, and have been for years. They are not moving to the Northeast in any great numbers at all.

I'm one of them (via Florida), and you couldn't blast me out of here.

The poll results seem to reflect the reality on the ground much more than the majority of the posts in the thread so far as well.
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Old 05-22-2017, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Check out the population stats from the Census. Midwesterners are moving to the South in droves, and have been for years. They are not moving to the Northeast in any great numbers at all.

I'm one of them (via Florida), and you couldn't blast me out of here.

The poll results seem to reflect the reality on the ground much more than the majority of the posts in the thread so far as well.
Bad analogy -- everyone moves to Florida.
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Old 05-22-2017, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Bad analogy -- everyone moves to Florida.
No, it isn't.

What about the ton of 'halfbacks' like me? There are literally hundreds of thousands of us in Atlanta and North Georgia alone. There are even more in the Carolinas.
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