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View Poll Results: The average Midwesterner fits better in
The Northeast 56 40.58%
The South 82 59.42%
Voters: 138. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-24-2017, 01:16 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,749 posts, read 6,160,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
That was a point I made earlier. It's a big thing in both Midwestern and Southern cultures to be nice/polite. That doesn't exist in the Northeast, especially the bigger cities. I spent my early life in the Midwest and people I met from both NYC and Philly really rubbed me the wrong way. They were rude and pushy.
I never understood why people allow themselves to be pushed around by someone from NYC. They're harmless.
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Old 05-24-2017, 02:49 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,856,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TTG2020 View Post
There should've been a third option. Some parts of the Midwest are more like the Northeast and other parts are more like the South. I voted Northeast because Pennsylvania has more ties with the Midwest than anywhere in the South.
Yes, I agree with this. I think places like

Ohio
Michigan
Wisconsin
Minnesota

Are probably more like the Northeast whereas places like:

Indiana
Missouri
Some of Illinois
Kansas

Probably have more Southern carryover.

Middle America states like Iowa or Nebraska seem to be so uniquely Midwestern that I think their residents might think either place is too different from their home.

I think that these places

Pennsylvania
New York
Connecticut
Rhode Island
Vermont
New Hampshire
And even Maine

Won't seem very different to what most people in the Midwest are used to.

Heck, put your average Ohioan anywhere in the Northeast and I think they wouldn't feel very out of place at all. Now someone from Kansas...different story
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Old 05-24-2017, 03:03 PM
 
2,024 posts, read 1,027,397 times
Reputation: 2682
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Yes, I agree with this. I think places like

Ohio
Michigan
Wisconsin
Minnesota

Are probably more like the Northeast whereas places like:

Indiana
Missouri
Some of Illinois
Kansas

Probably have more Southern carryover.

Middle America states like Iowa or Nebraska seem to be so uniquely Midwestern that I think their residents might think either place is too different from their home.

I think that these places

Pennsylvania
New York
Connecticut
Rhode Island
Vermont
New Hampshire
And even Maine

Won't seem very different to what most people in the Midwest are used to.

Heck, put your average Ohioan anywhere in the Northeast and I think they wouldn't feel very out of place at all. Now someone from Kansas...different story
Not sure where you're from, OP, but you definitely seem to buy in to stereotypes of certain states. Have you ever been to Des Moines, Kansas City, or Omaha? They're like any city the same size, anywhere in the US. These aren't cities that languish in the past, don't have skyscrapers, lofts; don't have access to the Internet, or the same clothing that everyone in the COUNTRY has access to. Most people don't go down to the local mall to buy their clothing, they order it online. Trends are the same everywhere. Lifestyles may not be as hectic, but you can be sure there is "hectic" in those cities. Rural areas are rural areas...no matter where they are. The middle of Kansas might be like this place in NY state that I just dropped down into from Google Maps...totally randomly. Please don't try to have us think that all of NY, PA, etc., are just like their major cities. Every state has rural. You really need to know your stuff, if you're going to assume all you're assuming. People farm in NY and PA, just like they do in Kansas and Iowa. You might assume (as do many) that Omaha is a quiet, fairly well-to-do city with no racial issues. You would be WRONG. Omaha has a history of racial divide, past rioting, etc. Not sure if that fits in with your stereotype of Nebraska. Just don't buy into stereotypes, based on...pretty much nothing.

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.7863...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 05-24-2017, 03:04 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,856,134 times
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Now I am gonna go ahead and answer for myself here now. I voted Northeast BUT for my own situation I can see why the South would win. I personally never felt out of place in the South BUT I can rightfully say that my native home (Chicago) felt more like an outside place to me no matter how long I lived there. As I got older I realized a good place for me is either the South or the Lower Midwest.

So as a personal anecdote I would vote the South, and lots of people I grew up with would agree but many others also chose the Northeast.

I feel like I could fit in the Northeast. But not to as great of an extent as the South. Plus, I don't particularly like the attitudes of the area and the ethnic pride gets annoying sometimes. However my liberal politics and my general disdain for heavy conservative areas means that if I do go South, a bigger city will be the ideal. Not to say I can't live amongst conservatives. I have. I just tend to not enjoy it as much especially as a single male who prefers liberal women. This is why I felt like I fit in quite well in Louisville when I lived there.

My current home of Cincinnati is of course Midwestern BUT it has elements of both Pennsylvania and Kentucky. So, with someone like me who prefers the South to a slight degree but doesn't like it overly in your face, the lower Midwest seems a happy middle. The metro is little c conservative but the city is typically liberal and artistically up and coming.

For people, I prefer the South (especially the women in terms of looks haha). For culture and intellect (as a whole), the Northeast. I would give the South like maybe a 55/45 win over the NE. But I will end this but saying I don't consider myself a typical Chicagoan and I don't feel super representative of Northern Illinois. Southern Ohio seems to have more people like me and in a few weeks I feel like I fit in better here than back home and it was the same when I lived in the South. I guess the Great Lakes is certainly not for me.

That said New England to me would win out over the South or would be tied because the general New England feel just seems to take everything I like and combine it in one. In terms of climate, politics, topography, history, food, and culture New England would be the subregion I choose. I also have an affinity for women of Western European descent and both New England and the South have heavy concentrations of this.
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Old 05-24-2017, 03:11 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,856,134 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Not sure where you're from, OP, but you definitely seem to buy in to stereotypes of certain states. Have you ever been to Des Moines, Kansas City, or Omaha? They're like any city the same size, anywhere in the US. These aren't cities that languish in the past, don't have skyscrapers, lofts; don't have access to the Internet, or the same clothing that everyone in the COUNTRY has access to. Most people don't go down to the local mall to buy their clothing, they order it online. Trends are the same everywhere. Lifestyles may not be as hectic, but you can be sure there is "hectic" in those cities. Rural areas are rural areas...no matter where they are. The middle of Kansas might be like this place in NY state that I just dropped down into from Google Maps...totally randomly. Please don't try to have us think that all of NY, PA, etc., are just like their major cities. Every state has rural. You really need to know your stuff, if you're going to assume all you're assuming. People farm in NY and PA, just like they do in Kansas and Iowa. You might assume (as do many) that Omaha is a quiet, fairly well-to-do city with no racial issues. You would be WRONG. Omaha has a history of racial divide, past rioting, etc. Not sure if that fits in with your stereotype of Nebraska. Just don't buy into stereotypes, based on...pretty much nothing.

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.7863...7i13312!8i6656
Please don't assume anything about my opinions. You have me all wrong. You essentially argued against points I never made. Congrats
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Old 05-24-2017, 03:14 PM
 
2,024 posts, read 1,027,397 times
Reputation: 2682
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Please don't assume anything about my opinions. You have me all wrong. You essentially argued against points I never made. Congrats
I guess I read between the lines....that their (NE, IA, KS) places are so "unique."
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Old 05-24-2017, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,406,762 times
Reputation: 2093
I'm originally from the NYC metro, currently living in Ohio.

The Midwest is such an expansive and surprisingly diverse region. Second generation Arab-Americans living in Dearborn, Applachians in coal communities in Southern Ohio, African-Americans from the east side of Cleveland, the 1%-ers living on Chicago's north shore, farmers in Iowa etc.

I'll stick to Ohio since that's what I know.

Most people in the cities of Cleveland and Columbus and their close in suburbs would fit in better in the northeast or larger urban centers in the south, such as Atlanta. Cincinnati and its inner suburbs fall into this category as well but probably to a lesser degree. You can throw in Toledo, Youngstown, Dayton, Akron and the rest of Ohio's second tier urban centers.

The exurbs, further out suburbs and many rural communities of the state would fit in better in the south.
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Old 05-24-2017, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
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I do not like the Northeast at all and I went to graduate school in NYC. The answer to the question is obvious it depends on the personality of the Midwestern native.
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Old 05-24-2017, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 1,167,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I'm originally from the NYC metro, currently living in Ohio.

The Midwest is such an expansive and surprisingly diverse region. Second generation Arab-Americans living in Dearborn, Applachians in coal communities in Southern Ohio, African-Americans from the east side of Cleveland, the 1%-ers living on Chicago's north shore, farmers in Iowa etc.

I'll stick to Ohio since that's what I know.

Most people in the cities of Cleveland and Columbus and their close in suburbs would fit in better in the northeast or larger urban centers in the south, such as Atlanta. Cincinnati and its inner suburbs fall into this category as well but probably to a lesser degree. You can throw in Toledo, Youngstown, Dayton, Akron and the rest of Ohio's second tier urban centers.

The exurbs, further out suburbs and many rural communities of the state would fit in better in the south.
All the people in my family from Ohio moved to the South Georgia and Florida. Ohio natives love the South for some reason especially South Carolina and TN. Never heard any Ohio native any they love the Northeast except for visiting but I take it everyone's experience is different.
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Old 05-24-2017, 04:54 PM
 
4,407 posts, read 4,615,859 times
Reputation: 3849
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I never understood why people allow themselves to be pushed around by someone from NYC. They're harmless.
I discovered that later. Many come across as mean but it isn't their intention. They are usually nicer than they appear on the surface.
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