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Old 05-21-2017, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
3,255 posts, read 1,633,014 times
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I don't have hay fever myself. But it seems like many people in dryer, less humid areas have more allergies then wet and lush environments with lots of trees, plants and dense forestry.

I have been in the Omaha area for almost month and it smells lush and rains constantly it seems but for some reason I can count the amount of sneezes I have heard on one hand and no one seems to be blowing their nose.

Forests, Rain, Trees, Flowers and yards that are overgrown from all the humidity and rain yet people seem to have clearer sinuses and sniffle and sneeze less then Las Vegas which is like Mars.

Same thing in Florida a few years ago I noticed that people were clean as a whistle on sinuses in public despite the dense, lush smell of the area.

In Las Vegas, Phoenix and Inland parts of California seems like allergies are a way of life for many.

Oddly, the closer to the coast in California the less sneezing and sniffling there is despite the humid lushness.

People seemed very congested in Riverside Inland compared to Orange County where virtually sounded congested.

I always thought that those who have allergies were advised to go Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico but so many seem so congested, sniffly, sneezey compared to very wet, lush areas.
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Old 05-21-2017, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Well I'm more inclined to sneeze in a dry dusty environment than a more moist one. Maybe its dust in the air?
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Old 05-21-2017, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Sale Creek, TN
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Rain will knock the pollen out of the air. Takes it to the ground with it as it falls. Look at puddles of water after a rain, that yellow stuff floating on the surface, pollen.
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Old 05-21-2017, 09:01 PM
 
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Uh, dry air allows the pollens to blow around more easily.

And on the flip side, wet climates bring on plenty of mold allergies, which you don't see in arid climates unless someone has a poorly-ventilated room or a leak that went undetected for a long time.
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Old 05-22-2017, 06:11 AM
 
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It's the moisture (humidity) in the air. Air with more moisture is heavier than dry air which helps keep airborne allergens down and have always argued the premise of moving to the desert areas was bad advice for people with sinus/allergy issues. I do better with my allergies and sinusitis here in Florida though where I'm located (Central Florida) still sees chilly/dry air in the winter and would be much better off further south (SE or SW Florida on the coast) where it never really gets cold, or overly dry.
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Old 05-22-2017, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
It's the moisture (humidity) in the air. Air with more moisture is heavier than dry air which helps keep airborne allergens down and have always argued the premise of moving to the desert areas was bad advice for people with sinus/allergy issues.
This is incorrect. Moist air is less dense (lighter) than dry air


WHY IS MOIST AIR LESS DENSE THAN DRY AIR AT SAME TEMPERATURE

Quote:
Water vapor (H2O) is composed of one Oxygen atom and two Hydrogen atoms. Hydrogen is the lightest element at 1 atomic unit while Oxygen is 16 atomic units. Thus the water vapor atom has an atomic mass of 1 + 1 + 16 = 18 atomic units. At 18 atomic units, water vapor is lighter than diatomic Oxygen (32 units) and diatomic Nitrogen (28 units). Thus at a constant temperature, the more water vapor that displaces the other gases, the less dense that air will become.
....

You may be familiar with the concept that moist air is less dense than dry air. This is true when both have the same temperature or when the moist air is warmer. Said in another way, air with a greater percentage of water vapor will be less dense than air with a lesser percentage of water vapor at the same temperature. Often people erroneously believe that moist air is denser than dry air because very moist air is more difficult to breathe than dry air.
A possible explanation for more allergies in dry and warm climate is that the warmer temperature promotes plant growth thus producing more pollen.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4829390/

Quote:
When exposed to warmer temperatures and higher levels of CO2, plants grow more vigorously and produce more pollen than they otherwise would.
Rains also help to wash down pollen grains whereas winds will stir them up and blow them around.

This article explain the 4 factors influencing the severity of allergy season (pollen counts)

http://acaai.org/news/what-four-fact...allergy-season

Quote:
The presence of the common causes of spring allergies pollen and mold can fluctuate depending on a number of weather-related factors. Here are some of the conditions that can affect pollen counts, according tothe experts at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

* Length of the growing season. Longer growing seasons might be a good thing for famers and gardeners, but it can mean increased misery for allergy sufferers, as it increases the time pollen and mold are present as well.

* Erratic weather. A warmer than usual winter season, as experienced this year, makes trees pollinate earlier. If spring weather fluctuates greatly between warm and cold spells, it can result in more intense periods of pollen release during the warm spells, when plants take the cue to grow and release pollen.

* Rainfall. Rain can be either a good thing or a bad thing for allergy sufferers, depending on when it happens. The worst allergy seasons are often preceded by a wet spring, which promotes rapid plant growth later on. But rain can also provide a much-needed respite for those with allergies, as a heavy rainfall can help clear the air of pollen.

* Wind. Dry and windy weather is not kind to people with allergies, as the wind spreads pollen and mold.

Allergies vary from people to people. I live in NY and suffer from hay fever in the spring with May being the worst month. I must be allergic to from certain tree pollen in the Northeast. I just came back from a trip to Washington and Idaho. My allergy started just before my trip, completely stopped during the 2 weeks hiking in mostly evergreen forest. I started sneezing the moment I walked out of Bradley airport in CT!

At this time of the year, WA and ID's temperatures are about the same as in NY but the air is much dryer. I did see quite a bit of pollen in these states (mostly from grasses, plants and deciduous trees in the valley) but it appeared that I was not allergic to those types of pollen.

Last edited by BellaDL; 05-22-2017 at 06:44 AM..
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Old 05-22-2017, 07:27 AM
 
21,188 posts, read 30,372,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
This is incorrect. Moist air is less dense (lighter) than dry air
You might question that on a day where the temperature is 90 degrees with humidity and dewpoint levels at around 70%. It certainly makes more sense and feels that way.
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Old 05-22-2017, 03:38 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 19 days ago)
 
8,692 posts, read 10,839,690 times
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Less of a barrier if your mucosa and sinuses are drier. Allergens more apt to cause symptoms? Or, maybe certain people more susceptible to certain allergens wherever they live, drier or more humid. I have them everywhere--even in a cold climate in the winter I was sneezing a lot. Mold? Dust? Who knows?
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Old 05-22-2017, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,560 posts, read 10,268,098 times
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My allergies have never been worse than they were when we lived in Dallas - and Dallas is freakin' humid. I got 3-4 sinus infections per year and my hay fever was nearly constant from February 'til November. It SUCKED. Here in Denver I have 2 or 3 weeks tops where my allergies are noticeably bad.
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