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Old 06-03-2017, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,832,710 times
Reputation: 2858

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
I found very different results.. haven't look into the differences in criteria. Both use Vocativ's results.
https://www.monster.com/career-advic...-live-and-work
Vocativ: Best Cities For People Under 35 - Business Insider
It's CNBC. That says it all. The second list is more accurate. Career opportunities and an active single lifestyle is what is going to be most desirable.
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Old 06-03-2017, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,595 posts, read 4,020,780 times
Reputation: 2932
CNBC didn't come up with the list. An outfit called Growella did.

I think all the cities on the list have job opportunities and are conducive for an active single lifestyle. Also, many people under 35 are married or in a long term relationship.
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Old 06-03-2017, 11:17 AM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,891,788 times
Reputation: 3491
All 3 of those lists fluctuate too much. One has Nashville as #3 and the other doesnt include it all, but includes Dallas suburbs. The other list has New York #1 then also doesnt include NY.

Whats best for millennials is obviously still subjective. NY is best for my field, by far, but it is majorly expensive, and not just in rent. Garland, TX is cheap, but does nothing for me career wise.

These lists give a good indicator and all the healthy places, but none of them can be taken as gospel, even if theyre using calculations and not "what looks cool on instagram."
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Old 06-03-2017, 11:21 AM
 
21,207 posts, read 30,427,905 times
Reputation: 19657
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg10556 View Post
This list is a terrible idea for an "average" person as far as cost of living goes. Anyone with a normal paying job couldn't make it in San Francisco,San Jose, Seattle, etc... unless they had 10 roommates. I understand the scenery & things to do factor, but it's just not accurate.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg10556 View Post
I wouldn't say overstated, the average price of a 1 bedroom in SF is $3500. I live in the "East Bay" around Walnut Creek (30 mins from SF) and pay $2200 for a 2 bedroom, which is obviously more affordable, but still not cheap by any means.

The average person, making $50K-$70K will not find it easy to manage everything here, without roommates.
Obviously a tad overstated utilizing ten as an example don't you think? Like anywhere else people adapt to what they can afford via either longer commutes or changing cities. The point is given population growth and market conditions it's clearly not a detriment to the majority.
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Old 06-03-2017, 11:25 AM
 
2,517 posts, read 2,280,503 times
Reputation: 1851
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
All 3 of those lists fluctuate too much. One has Nashville as #3 and the other doesnt include it all, but includes Dallas suburbs. The other list has New York #1 then also doesnt include NY.

Whats best for millennials is obviously still subjective. NY is best for my field, by far, but it is majorly expensive, and not just in rent. Garland, TX is cheap, but does nothing for me career wise.

These lists give a good indicator and all the healthy places, but none of them can be taken as gospel, even if theyre using calculations and not "what looks cool on instagram."
Yup... that was my point in providing other sources.... these lists are bit all over the place. The original list for me would be the worst from a career and earnings potential perspective.
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Old 06-03-2017, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,595 posts, read 4,020,780 times
Reputation: 2932
How does a person know what he will get paid at a company in a city if he's never applied to companies in that city and been made an offer. To generalize about salaries in a city, it seems like a person would at least need to get a handful of job offers. Companies in the same city don't all pay the same salary.

Generally, to maximize salary, a person should focus on employers, not living in a specific city.

I don't know why people feel the need to say these kind of lists are subjective. That seems obvious especially given they are arbitrarily weighting their criteria and arbitrarily selecting certain criteria. But some of the criteria the list is based on is based on data, such as cost of living. They weighted cost of living at 50 percent.

I would have included weather and proximity to mountains, lakes, and beaches as criteria.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 06-03-2017 at 11:56 AM..
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Old 06-03-2017, 11:47 AM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,530,071 times
Reputation: 2315
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Obviously a tad overstated utilizing ten as an example don't you think? Like anywhere else people adapt to what they can afford via either longer commutes or changing cities. The point is given population growth and market conditions it's clearly not a detriment to the majority.
Okay, 10 was probably overkill, but you get my point. And while longer commutes can cut down costs, in the Bay Area it doesn't make it worth it in my personal opinion.

Pay $3500 for a 1 bedroom in the city of SF, $3000 in Oakland. Then a little further inland (my area) you get to the $2000 range.

However if you go further away than that, and get lucky to pay $1500, you then deal with no public transit such as BART, and deal with 2hr-3hr commutes with traffic at times. To each their own I suppose

The main point I was making, that with normal average salaries, staying afloat in certain cities is a major challenge
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Old 06-03-2017, 12:08 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,891,788 times
Reputation: 3491
Whne it comes to San Fran, there are people who come straight out of college and can afford those rents because of the cushy tech salaries, but they are not the average millennial.

Same for NYC. Some guys are fortunate enough to step out of college then step into Wall Street, but they are not average.

I think the CNBC list does the best job represeting average and a broader scale of folk, though still not perfect. While the other lists do a good job showing cities for people who are more career-focused.

I have to say though one thing that bothers me about these lists is that Atlanta, GA is on none of them. You cannot tell me that Reno, Garland, and Lubbock are better places for millennials than Atlanta. In both jobs and activities. Atlanta punches above its weight in corporate presence alone, which is a reason NY and SF are valued so high.
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Old 06-03-2017, 12:11 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,241,502 times
Reputation: 2222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
Whne it comes to San Fran, there are people who come straight out of college and can afford those rents because of the cushy tech salaries, but they are not the average millennial.

Same for NYC. Some guys are fortunate enough to step out of college then step into Wall Street, but they are not average.

I think the CNBC list does the best job represeting average and a broader scale of folk, though still not perfect. While the other lists do a good job showing cities for people who are more career-focused.

I have to say though one thing that bothers me about these lists is that Atlanta, GA is on none of them. You cannot tell me that Reno, Garland, and Lubbock are better places for millennials than Atlanta. In both jobs and activities. Atlanta punches above its weight in corporate presence alone, which is a reason NY and SF are valued so high.
That whole list lost credibility when it included Lubbock, Garland, Reno, and Harrisburg PA. Actually, I didn't realize it had Garland, TX on there. I stopped reading it after I saw Harrisburg LOL.
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Old 06-03-2017, 12:40 PM
 
2,517 posts, read 2,280,503 times
Reputation: 1851
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
That whole list lost credibility when it included Lubbock, Garland, Reno, and Harrisburg PA. Actually, I didn't realize it had Garland, TX on there. I stopped reading it after I saw Harrisburg LOL.
Haha same here... ridiculous locations especially the original list.
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